Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Browning, Robert: In a Gondola

Browning, Robert portréja

In a Gondola (Angol)


He sings.

I send my heart up to thee, all my heart
In this my singing.
For the stars help me, and the sea bears part;
The very night is clinging
Closer to Venice' streets to leave one space
Above me, whence thy face
May light my joyous heart to thee its dwelling-place.

She speaks.

Say after me, and try to say
My very words, as if each word
Came from you of your own accord,
In your own voice, in your own way:
``This woman's heart and soul and brain
``Are mine as much as this gold chain
``She bids me wear; which'' (say again)
``I choose to make by cherishing
``A precious thing, or choose to fling
``Over the boat-side, ring by ring.''
And yet once more say ... no word more!
Since words are only words. Give o'er!

Unless you call me, all the same,
Familiarly by my pet name,
Which if the Three should hear you call,
And me reply to, would proclaim
At once our secret to them all.
Ask of me, too, command me, blame---
Do, break down the partition-wall
'Twixt us, the daylight world beholds
Curtained in dusk and splendid folds!
What's left but---all of me to take?
I am the Three's: prevent them, slake
Your thirst! 'Tis said, the Arab sage,
In practising with gems, can loose
Their subtle spirit in his cruce
And leave but ashes: so, sweet mage,
Leave them my ashes when thy use
Sucks out my soul, thy heritage!

He sings.

I.

Past we glide, and past, and past!
What's that poor Agnese doing
Where they make the shutters fast?
Grey Zanobi's just a-wooing
To his couch the purchased bride:
Past we glide!

II.

Past we glide, and past, and past!
Why's the Pucci Palace flaring
Like a beacon to the blast?
Guests by hundreds, not one caring
If the dear host's neck were wried:
Past we glide!

She sings.

I.

The moth's kiss, first!
Kiss me as if you made believe
You were not sure, this eve,
How my face, your flower, had pursed
Its petals up; so, here and there
You brush it, till I grow aware
Who wants me, and wide ope I burst.

II.

The bee's kiss, now!
Kiss me as if you entered gay
My heart at some noonday,
A bud that dares not disallow
The claim, so all is rendered up,
And passively its shattered cup
Over your head to sleep I bow.

He sings.

I.

What are we two?
I am a Jew,
And carry thee, farther than friends can pursue,
To a feast of our tribe;
Where they need thee to bribe
The devil that blasts them unless he imbibe
Thy ... Scatter the vision for ever! And now,
As of old, I am I, thou art thou!

II.

Say again, what we are?
The sprite of a star,
I lure thee above where the destinies bar
My plumes their full play
Till a ruddier ray
Than my pale one announce there is withering away
Some ... Scatter the vision for ever! And now,
As of old, I am I, thou art thou!

He muses.

Oh, which were best, to roam or rest?
The land's lap or the water's breast?
To sleep on yellow millet-sheaves,
Or swim in lucid shallows just
Eluding water-lily leaves,
An inch from Death's black fingers, thrust
To lock you, whom release he must;
Which life were best on Summer eves?

He speaks, musing.

Lie back; could thought of mine improve you?
From this shoulder let there spring
A wing; from this, another wing;
Wings, not legs and feet, shall move you!
Snow-white must they spring, to blend
With your flesh, but I intend
They shall deepen to the end,
Broader, into burning gold,
Till both wings crescent-wise enfold
Your perfect self, from 'neath your feet
To o'er your head, where, lo, they meet
As if a million sword-blades hurled
Defiance from you to the world!

Rescue me thou, the only real!
And scare away this mad ideal
That came, nor motions to depart!
Thanks! Now, stay ever as thou art!

Still he muses.

I.

What if the Three should catch at last
Thy serenader? While there's cast
Paul's cloak about my head, and fast
Gian pinions me, himself has past
His stylet thro' my back; I reel;
And ... is it thou I feel?

II.

They trail me, these three godless knaves,
Past every church that saints and saves,
Nor stop till, where the cold sea raves
By Lido's wet accursed graves,
They scoop mine, roll me to its brink,
And ... on thy breast I sink

She replies, musing.

Dip your arm o'er the boat-side, elbow-deep,
As I do: thus: were death so unlike sleep,
Caught this way? Death's to fear from flame or steel,
Or poison doubtless; but from water---feel!

Go find the bottom! Would you stay me? There!
Now pluck a great blade of that ribbon-grass
To plait in where the foolish jewel was,
I flung away: since you have praised my hair,
'Tis proper to be choice in what I wear.

He speaks.

Row home? must we row home? Too surely
Know I where its front's demurely
Over the Giudecca piled;
Window just with window mating,
Door on door exactly waiting,
All's the set face of a child:
But behind it, where's a trace
Of the staidness and reserve,
And formal lines without a curve,
In the same child's playing-face?
No two windows look one way
O'er the small sea-water thread
Below them. Ah, the autumn day
I, passing, saw you overhead!
First, out a cloud of curtain blew,
Then a sweet cry, and last came you---
To catch your lory that must needs
Escape just then, of all times then,
To peck a tall plant's fleecy seeds,
And make me happiest of men.
I scarce could breathe to see you reach
So far back o'er the balcony
To catch him ere he climbed too high
Above you in the Smyrna peach
That quick the round smooth cord of gold,
This coiled hair on your head, unrolled,
Fell down you like a gorgeous snake
The Roman girls were wont, of old,
When Rome there was, for coolness' sake
To let lie curling o'er their bosoms.
Dear lory,*
may his beak retain
Ever its delicate rose stain
As if the wounded lotus-blossoms
Had marked their thief to know again!

Stay longer yet, for others' sake
Than mine! What should your chamber do?
---With all its rarities that ache
In silence while day lasts, but wake
At night-time and their life renew,
Suspended just to pleasure you
Who brought against their will together
These objects, and, while day lasts, weave
Around them such a magic tether
That dumb they look: your harp, believe,
With all the sensitive tight strings
Which dare not speak, now to itself
Breathes slumberously, as if some elf
Went in and out the chords, his wings
Make murmur wheresoe'er they graze,
As an angel may, between the maze
Of midnight palace-pillars, on
And on, to sow God's plagues, have gone
Through guilty glorious Babylon.
And while such murmurs flow, the nymph
Bends o'er the harp-top from her shell
As the dry limpet for the lymph
Come with a tune be knows so well.
And how your statues' hearts must swell!
And how your pictures must descend
To see each other, friend with friend!
Oh, could you take them by surprise,
You'd find Schidone's eager Duke
Doing the quaintest courtesies
To that prim saint by Haste-thee-Luke!
And, deeper into her rock den,
Bold Castelfranco's Magdalen
You'd find retreated from the ken
Of that robed counsel-keeping Ser---
As if the Tizian thinks of her,
And is not, rather, gravely bent
On seeing for himself what toys
Are these, his progeny invent,
What litter now the board employs
Whereon he signed a document
That got him murdered! Each enjoys
Its night so well, you cannot break
The sport up, so, indeed must make
More stay with me, for others' sake.

She speaks.

I.

To-morrow, if a harp-string, say,
Is used to tie the jasmine back
That overfloods my room with sweets,
Contrive your Zorzi somehow meets
My Zanze! If the ribbon's black,
The Three are watching: keep away!

II.

Your gondola---let Zorzi wreathe
A mesh of water-weeds about
its prow, as if he unaware
Had struck some quay or bridge-foot stair!
That I may throw a paper out
As you and he go underneath.

There's Zanze's vigilant taper; safe are we.
Only one minute more to-night with me?
Resume your past self of a month ago!
Be you the bashful gallant, I will be
The lady with the colder breast than snow.
Now bow you, as becomes, nor touch my hand
More than I touch yours when I step to land,
And say, ``All thanks, Siora!''---
Heart to heart
And lips to lips! Yet once more, ere we part,
Clasp me and make me thine, as mine thou art!
[He is surprised, and stabbed.
It was ordained to be so, sweet!---and best
Comes now, beneath thine eyes, upon thy breast.
Still kiss me! Care not for the cowards! Care
Only to put aside thy beauteous hair
My blood will hurt! The Three, I do not scorn
To death, because they never lived: but I
Have lived indeed, and so---(yet one more kiss)---can die!


Egy gondolában (Magyar)

(A nő, a velencei Hármak egyikének neje: a férfi, kalandor idegen)

A férfi énekel.

Felküldöm hozzád szívem, mindenem
ez énekemben.
S részt vesz a víz s az ég segít nekem,
az éjjel nemkülönben
közelb tapad utcáidhoz, Velence
hogy el ne öntse
szép arcod mely szívem otthona s messze kincse.

A nő szól.

Próbáld utánam mondani
saját hanglejtésed szerint
e szavaimat, mintha mind
saját szívedből szállna ki,
«Ez asszony szíve s szelleme
«Enyém, mint lánca száz szeme,
«melyet - mondd! - nékem ád íme:
«ha akarom becézgetem,
«ha akarom, hát elvetem
«Gyűrűnkint, itt a vizeken.»
És mondd tovább... ne mondd tovább:
mert szó csak szó! Egy szót se hát!

Vagy mégis... Szólíts édesem
családias keresztneven
mit ha a Három hallana
e kis szavad s feleletem
minden titkot kivallana.
Szidj, kérdezz, parancsolj nekem,
bontsd az osztály-falat le ma,
melyet köztünk a napvilág
oly gőgösen ragyogva lát.

Mit adjak? - mindenem! neked:
A Hármaké vagyok: de vedd
előbb ki részed! Az arab
bölcs tégelyében sok darab
becses gyöngyből hamu marad:
így szidd ki édes mágusom
a lelkemet az ajkamon -
nekik csak hamvamat hagyom!

A férfi énekel.

I.

Átcsuszunk és át meg át!
Mit csinál a szegény Ágnes
hogy bezárja ablakát?
A m ö g ö t t meg - pénz nagy mágnes -
vén Zanóbi csókolgatja
vásárolt menyasszonyát -
Át meg át!

II.

Átsikamlunk, át meg át!
A Palazzo Puzzi lángol
őrtűzként az éjen át,
benne száz vendég ficánkol
s egy se bánná ha a gazda
kitörné is a nyakát -
Át meg át!

A nő énekel.

I.

Előbb a lepke-csókot!
Csókolj mint aki azt hiszi,
az estelen
még nem nyíltam ki teljesen
és csókol addig míg virágja
szirmát lassan kitárja tágra
s a csókolót észreveszi.

II.

No már a méhe-csókot!
Csókolj, mint aki hirtelen
egy víg delen
bimbó keblébe száll, s midőn
beszállt: az, szűzi türelemmel,
mert néki ellenállni nem mer,
kelyhét rácsukja szenvedőn.

A férfi énekel.

I.

Mi vagyok én?
Zsidólegény
s messze röpítlek a hab szekerén
hol templomom áll:
a rabbi vár
táplálni az ördögöt oszlopinál
a te... Űzd el ez álmokat! Úgy kicsikém:
te megint te vagy, én pedig én!

II.

Megint mi vagyok?
Csillag, de halott:
aki ront egy frisstüzű csillagot:
még égni akar:
szegény fiatal
csillag! tüzet ád neki és belehal!
s te vagy... ązd el ez álmokat! Úgy kicsikém:
te megint te vagy, én pedig én.

Ábrándozik.
Mi boldogabb? A part? A hab?
Menni? maradni boldogabb?
Aludni sárga, dús köles
közt? Úszni sík nagy áramot
folyton kerülve az öles
hintázó vízi liliomot,
míg a halál jég-ujja les?...
Nyáresteken mi volna jobb?

Megszólal, ábrándozva.
Maradj, ábrándom mit segíthet?
Ez édes vállból nőne bár
egy szárny, és hozzá nőne pár!
téged nem láb, csak szárny röpíthet
Húsodból, mely hófehér,
nőjön szárny hát, hófehér,
s ne maradjon hófehér:
dús aranyba folyjon át,
ragyogó sarlós hold gyanánt
s folyjon fejed fölött haránt
eggyé, mint száz fény-élű kard,
elűzve tőled bármi bajt.

Jer, szabadíts meg, egy-valóság,
hogy tűnjön ez álom-bohóság,
mely oly makacs, és oly irigy -
Úgy! És maradj meg mindig - így!

Még egyre a férfi ábrándozik.

I.
Hátha kezük közé kerül
imádód? Míg fejem körül
Pál kingalléra hengerül,
Gian meg kötözget emberül:
ő nyárssal szúr át, szédülök,
és... és feléd dülök.

II.

Már nem segít se kép, se szent:
nézd a Három istentelent!
A partra von, hol messze lent
Lidó hulláma sírt jelent
Löknek - keresztjelet vetek -
s... kebledre süllyedek.

A nő felel ábrándozva.
Mártsd ujjad le, mint én csinálom - így.
Nem volna halni édes álom így?
Acéltól, lángtól borzad a haló,
Méregtől épen!... A víz puha, jó!

Menj, nézd meg, lenn is ily lágy, kellemes?
Ne még? - Fogj hát egy pálinkás füvet,
hajam mivel dicsérted, érdemes,
hogy új ékszer díszítse és nemes.

A férfi szól.

Haza kell menni? Haza - máris?
Tudom. Giudeccai kanális:
a ház félénken néz fölé.
Ajtók át ajtókra lelnek,
ablak ablaknak felel meg:
rendes arc, mint gyermeké.
De mögötte hol az ép
ép szabályos benyomás,
cifraságtalan vonás,
melytől a gyermek arca szép?
S merre zúg az utcahab,
nincs két ablak egy alak
lenézni. - Ah, a nyári nap,
mikor ott megláttalak!
Előbb a függöny fellege -
egy édes hang - és végre Te -
jöttél, megfogni madarad,
mely, épen akkor, magszemet
keresni az erkély alatt
szállt - s boldoggá tett engemet!
Elállt tüdőm belé, midőn
ott láttalak kihajlani
(elfogni őt, még mielőtt
nagyon távolra szállna ki)
s a bomlott sík tekercsű fürt
a smyrna szőnyegen kidűlt,
mint kígyó milyet római
hölgyek, míg Róma trónon ült
hűséért szoktak hordani,
hordani keblükön kígyózva.
Kedves madárka! tartsa meg
színét, mely csőrén fényeleg,
minthogyha sebzett lótusz rózsa-
szin vére fogta volna meg!

Maradj tovább, bár csak másokér,
s nem értem! Mit csinál szobád?
- hol nappal kedvtelen henyél
de újra él, ha jő az éj
s megébred a sok ritkaság,
mely kedvedért cserélt hazát
és kedve ellen csügg szobádban
s amelyeket, míg tart, a nap
bűvös kötelékekkel átfon,
hogy holt-némáknak látszanak.
Hidd, hárfád érző húrja, zajt
mely nem mert dallal ütni máskor,
most álmos nótát peng magától,
mintha tündérke szállna rajt
s szárnyával izgatná a húrt
(mint angyal hordta sok borult
éjféli pillércsarnokon
át Isten átkát szárnyakon
rád, fényes bűnü Babylon!)
S faragva hárfa lemezén,
hallván az édes hangokat,
mint tikkadt csiga víz neszén,
kinyújt a nimfa hónyakat,
s a szobrok szíve mint dagad!
S a képek lába mint kilép,
s üdvözli egymást mind a kép!
Meg kéne őket lepni most,
Schidone kéjenc hercegét,
amint sok bókot vet, csinost
a formás Luca-szent felé,

Castelframco Magdája meg
félőn húzódik és remeg
hogy szirtje közt ne lássa meg
a Tizian tanácsura, -
pedig hát rá se gondol a:
rátok néz csak figyelmesen,
drága csecsebecsék sora,
mit unokája, kedvesem,
az asztalon fölhamola,
hol az okmányt aláirá
ő, mely halált hozott reá.
Mind kéjre tölti most az éjt:
ne rontsd meg, kérlek, ezt a kéjt:
marad velem - a kedvükért?

A nő szól.

I.

Holnap ha kékkel kötözöm
jázminom az ablakközön
találd módját, hogy mint minap
Zorzid meglelje Zanzimat!
De ha szalagja színe gyász:
résen a Három: jól vigyázz!

II.

És fonjon Zorzi gondolád
orrára zsurlót, borbolyát,
mintha mi partok mentirül
véletlenségbül rákerül:
hogy míg elsiklik idelenn,
közé dobhassam levelem.

Fenn pislog Zanzi éber mécse, jó.
Bizton vagyunk. Egy percre még veled!
Szedd össze, vedd fel régi lényedet:
légy a szerény lovag, a hódoló,
és hölgyed én, hidegebb mint a hó.
Hajolj mint illik, érintsd meg kezem,
segélj a partra illedelmesen
s mondd: "Köszönöm Siora!" -
Szívre szív!
Ajak ajakra! Utoljára szívj!
Tégy magadévá, s légy örökre hív.

Meglepik őket és a férfi
halálos döfést kap.

Így kellett lenni édes! - S íme vár
pillád alatt életnél szebb halál.
Csókolj! a gyáva néppel mit törődsz?
Szép fürtödet simítsd tovább csupán:
véremmel meg ne nedvezd! - Azután -
A Három sosem élt. Csak én magam
éltem s így halhatok - (egy csókot még) - vígan!



Kiadóhttp://epa.oszk.hu
Az idézet forrásaNyugat, 1919/1. szám

minimap