Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Shakespeare, William: Julius Caesar (Detail)

Shakespeare, William portréja

Julius Caesar (Detail) (Angol)


ACT I

SCENE I. Rome. A street.

Enter FLAVIUS, MARULLUS, and certain Commoners

FLAVIUS

Hence! home, you idle creatures get you home:
Is this a holiday? what! know you not,
Being mechanical, you ought not walk
Upon a labouring day without the sign
Of your profession? Speak, what trade art thou?

First Commoner

Why, sir, a carpenter.

MARULLUS

Where is thy leather apron and thy rule?
What dost thou with thy best apparel on?
You, sir, what trade are you?

Second Commoner

Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am but,
as you would say, a cobbler.

MARULLUS

But what trade art thou? answer me directly.

Second Commoner

A trade, sir, that, I hope, I may use with a safe
conscience; which is, indeed, sir, a mender of bad soles.

MARULLUS

What trade, thou knave? thou naughty knave, what trade?

Second Commoner

Nay, I beseech you, sir, be not out with me: yet,
if you be out, sir, I can mend you.

MARULLUS

What meanest thou by that? mend me, thou saucy fellow!

Second Commoner

Why, sir, cobble you.

FLAVIUS

Thou art a cobbler, art thou?

Second Commoner

Truly, sir, all that I live by is with the awl: I
meddle with no tradesman's matters, nor women's
matters, but with awl. I am, indeed, sir, a surgeon
to old shoes; when they are in great danger, I
recover them. As proper men as ever trod upon
neat's leather have gone upon my handiwork.

FLAVIUS

But wherefore art not in thy shop today?
Why dost thou lead these men about the streets?

Second Commoner

Truly, sir, to wear out their shoes, to get myself
into more work. But, indeed, sir, we make holiday,
to see Caesar and to rejoice in his triumph.

MARULLUS

Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings he home?
What tributaries follow him to Rome,
To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels?
You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!
O you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome,
Knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oft
Have you climb'd up to walls and battlements,
To towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops,
Your infants in your arms, and there have sat
The livelong day, with patient expectation,
To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome:
And when you saw his chariot but appear,
Have you not made an universal shout,
That Tiber trembled underneath her banks,
To hear the replication of your sounds
Made in her concave shores?
And do you now put on your best attire?
And do you now cull out a holiday?
And do you now strew flowers in his way
That comes in triumph over Pompey's blood? Be gone!
Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,
Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
That needs must light on this ingratitude.

FLAVIUS

Go, go, good countrymen, and, for this fault,
Assemble all the poor men of your sort;
Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears
Into the channel, till the lowest stream
Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.

Exeunt all the Commoners

See whether their basest metal be not moved;
They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
Go you down that way towards the Capitol;

This way will I

disrobe the images,
If you do find them deck'd with ceremonies.

MARULLUS

May we do so?
You know it is the feast of Lupercal.

FLAVIUS

It is no matter; let no images
Be hung with Caesar's trophies. I'll about,
And drive away the vulgar from the streets:
So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
These growing feathers pluck'd from Caesar's wing
Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,
Who else would soar above the view of men
And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

Exeunt

SCENE II. A public place.

Flourish. Enter CAESAR; ANTONY, for the course; CALPURNIA, PORTIA, DECIUS BRUTUS, CICERO, BRUTUS, CASSIUS, and CASCA; a great crowd following, among them a Soothsayer

CAESAR

Calpurnia!

CASCA

Peace, ho! Caesar speaks.

CAESAR

Calpurnia!

CALPURNIA

Here, my lord.

CAESAR

Stand you directly in Antonius' way,
When he doth run his course. Antonius!

ANTONY

Caesar, my lord?

CAESAR

Forget not, in your speed, Antonius,
To touch Calpurnia; for our elders say,
The barren, touched in this holy chase,
Shake off their sterile curse.

ANTONY

I shall remember:
When Caesar says 'do this,' it is perform'd.

CAESAR

Set on; and leave no ceremony out.

Flourish

Soothsayer

Caesar!

CAESAR

Ha! who calls?

CASCA

Bid every noise be still: peace yet again!

CAESAR

Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry 'Caesar!' Speak; Caesar is turn'd to hear.

Soothsayer

Beware the ides of March.

CAESAR

What man is that?

BRUTUS

A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.

CAESAR

Set him before me; let me see his face.

CASSIUS

Fellow, come from the throng; look upon Caesar.

CAESAR

What say'st thou to me now? speak once again.

Soothsayer

Beware the ides of March.

CAESAR

He is a dreamer; let us leave him: pass.

Sennet. Exeunt all except BRUTUS and CASSIUS

CASSIUS

Will you go see the order of the course?

BRUTUS

Not I.

CASSIUS

I pray you, do.

BRUTUS

I am not gamesome: I do lack some part
Of that quick spirit that is in Antony.
Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires;
I'll leave you.

CASSIUS

Brutus, I do observe you now of late:
I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have:
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
Over your friend that loves you.

BRUTUS

Cassius,
Be not deceived: if I have veil'd my look,
I turn the trouble of my countenance
Merely upon myself. Vexed I am
Of late with passions of some difference,
Conceptions only proper to myself,
Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors;
But let not therefore my good friends be grieved--
Among which number, Cassius, be you one--
Nor construe any further my neglect,
Than that poor Brutus, with himself at war,
Forgets the shows of love to other men.

CASSIUS

Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion;
By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.
Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?

BRUTUS

No, Cassius; for the eye sees not itself,
But by reflection, by some other things.

CASSIUS

'Tis just:
And it is very much lamented, Brutus,
That you have no such mirrors as will turn
Your hidden worthiness into your eye,
That you might see your shadow. I have heard,
Where many of the best respect in Rome,
Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus
And groaning underneath this age's yoke,
Have wish'd that noble Brutus had his eyes.

BRUTUS

Into what dangers would you lead me, Cassius,
That you would have me seek into myself
For that which is not in me?

CASSIUS

Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear:
And since you know you cannot see yourself
So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.
And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus:
Were I a common laugher, or did use
To stale with ordinary oaths my love
To every new protester; if you know
That I do fawn on men and hug them hard
And after scandal them, or if you know
That I profess myself in banqueting
To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.

Flourish, and shout

BRUTUS

What means this shouting? I do fear, the people
Choose Caesar for their king.

CASSIUS

Ay, do you fear it?
Then must I think you would not have it so.

BRUTUS

I would not, Cassius; yet I love him well.
But wherefore do you hold me here so long?
What is it that you would impart to me?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honour in one eye and death i' the other,
And I will look on both indifferently,
For let the gods so speed me as I love
The name of honour more than I fear death.

CASSIUS

I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
As well as I do know your outward favour.
Well, honour is the subject of my story.
I cannot tell what you and other men
Think of this life; but, for my single self,
I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
I was born free as Caesar; so were you:
We both have fed as well, and we can both
Endure the winter's cold as well as he:
For once, upon a raw and gusty day,
The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
Caesar said to me 'Darest thou, Cassius, now
Leap in with me into this angry flood,
And swim to yonder point?' Upon the word,
Accoutred as I was, I plunged in
And bade him follow; so indeed he did.
The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it
With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
And stemming it with hearts of controversy;
But ere we could arrive the point proposed,
Caesar cried 'Help me, Cassius, or I sink!'
I, as Aeneas, our great ancestor,
Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder
The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber
Did I the tired Caesar. And this man
Is now become a god, and Cassius is
A wretched creature and must bend his body,
If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
He had a fever when he was in Spain,
And when the fit was on him, I did mark
How he did shake: 'tis true, this god did shake;
His coward lips did from their colour fly,
And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world
Did lose his lustre: I did hear him groan:
Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans
Mark him and write his speeches in their books,
Alas, it cried 'Give me some drink, Titinius,'
As a sick girl. Ye gods, it doth amaze me
A man of such a feeble temper should
So get the start of the majestic world
And bear the palm alone.

Shout. Flourish

BRUTUS

Another general shout!
I do believe that these applauses are
For some new honours that are heap'd on Caesar.

CASSIUS

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Men at some time are masters of their fates:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?
Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
Write them together, yours is as fair a name;
Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,
Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,
That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
When went there by an age, since the great flood,
But it was famed with more than with one man?
When could they say till now, that talk'd of Rome,
That her wide walls encompass'd but one man?
Now is it Rome indeed and room enough,
When there is in it but one only man.
O, you and I have heard our fathers say,
There was a Brutus once that would have brook'd
The eternal devil to keep his state in Rome
As easily as a king.

BRUTUS

That you do love me, I am nothing jealous;
What you would work me to, I have some aim:
How I have thought of this and of these times,
I shall recount hereafter; for this present,
I would not, so with love I might entreat you,
Be any further moved. What you have said
I will consider; what you have to say
I will with patience hear, and find a time
Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
Till then, my noble friend, chew upon this:
Brutus had rather be a villager
Than to repute himself a son of Rome
Under these hard conditions as this time
Is like to lay upon us.

CASSIUS

I am glad that my weak words
Have struck but thus much show of fire from Brutus.

BRUTUS

The games are done and Caesar is returning.

CASSIUS

As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve;
And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you
What hath proceeded worthy note to-day.

Re-enter CAESAR and his Train

BRUTUS

I will do so. But, look you, Cassius,
The angry spot doth glow on Caesar's brow,
And all the rest look like a chidden train:
Calpurnia's cheek is pale; and Cicero
Looks with such ferret and such fiery eyes
As we have seen him in the Capitol,
Being cross'd in conference by some senators.

CASSIUS

Casca will tell us what the matter is.

CAESAR

Antonius!

ANTONY

Caesar?

CAESAR

Let me have men about me that are fat;
Sleek-headed men and such as sleep o' nights:
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.

ANTONY

Fear him not, Caesar; he's not dangerous;
He is a noble Roman and well given.

CAESAR

Would he were fatter! But I fear him not:
Yet if my name were liable to fear,
I do not know the man I should avoid
So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much;
He is a great observer and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music;
Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit
That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Such men as he be never at heart's ease
Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,
And therefore are they very dangerous.
I rather tell thee what is to be fear'd
Than what I fear; for always I am Caesar.
Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf,
And tell me truly what thou think'st of him.

Sennet. Exeunt CAESAR and all his Train, but CASCA

CASCA

You pull'd me by the cloak; would you speak with me?

BRUTUS

Ay, Casca; tell us what hath chanced to-day,
That Caesar looks so sad.

CASCA

Why, you were with him, were you not?

BRUTUS

I should not then ask Casca what had chanced.

CASCA

Why, there was a crown offered him: and being
offered him, he put it by with the back of his hand,
thus; and then the people fell a-shouting.

BRUTUS

What was the second noise for?

CASCA

Why, for that too.

CASSIUS

They shouted thrice: what was the last cry for?

CASCA

Why, for that too.

BRUTUS

Was the crown offered him thrice?

CASCA

Ay, marry, was't, and he put it by thrice, every
time gentler than other, and at every putting-by
mine honest neighbours shouted.

CASSIUS

Who offered him the crown?

CASCA

Why, Antony.

BRUTUS

Tell us the manner of it, gentle Casca.

CASCA

I can as well be hanged as tell the manner of it:
it was mere foolery; I did not mark it. I saw Mark
Antony offer him a crown;--yet 'twas not a crown
neither, 'twas one of these coronets;--and, as I told
you, he put it by once: but, for all that, to my
thinking, he would fain have had it. Then he
offered it to him again; then he put it by again:
but, to my thinking, he was very loath to lay his
fingers off it. And then he offered it the third
time; he put it the third time by: and still as he
refused it, the rabblement hooted and clapped their
chapped hands and threw up their sweaty night-caps
and uttered such a deal of stinking breath because
Caesar refused the crown that it had almost choked
Caesar; for he swounded and fell down at it: and
for mine own part, I durst not laugh, for fear of
opening my lips and receiving the bad air.

CASSIUS

But, soft, I pray you: what, did Caesar swound?

CASCA

He fell down in the market-place, and foamed at
mouth, and was speechless.

BRUTUS

'Tis very like: he hath the failing sickness.

CASSIUS

No, Caesar hath it not; but you and I,
And honest Casca, we have the falling sickness.

CASCA

I know not what you mean by that; but, I am sure,
Caesar fell down. If the tag-rag people did not
clap him and hiss him, according as he pleased and
displeased them, as they use to do the players in
the theatre, I am no true man.

BRUTUS

What said he when he came unto himself?

CASCA

Marry, before he fell down, when he perceived the
common herd was glad he refused the crown, he
plucked me ope his doublet and offered them his
throat to cut. An I had been a man of any
occupation, if I would not have taken him at a word,
I would I might go to hell among the rogues. And so
he fell. When he came to himself again, he said,
If he had done or said any thing amiss, he desired
their worships to think it was his infirmity. Three
or four wenches, where I stood, cried 'Alas, good
soul!' and forgave him with all their hearts: but
there's no heed to be taken of them; if Caesar had
stabbed their mothers, they would have done no less.

BRUTUS

And after that, he came, thus sad, away?

CASCA

Ay.

CASSIUS

Did Cicero say any thing?

CASCA

Ay, he spoke Greek.

CASSIUS

To what effect?

CASCA

Nay, an I tell you that, Ill ne'er look you i' the
face again: but those that understood him smiled at
one another and shook their heads; but, for mine own
part, it was Greek to me. I could tell you more
news too: Marullus and Flavius, for pulling scarfs
off Caesar's images, are put to silence. Fare you
well. There was more foolery yet, if I could
remember it.

CASSIUS

Will you sup with me to-night, Casca?

CASCA

No, I am promised forth.

CASSIUS

Will you dine with me to-morrow?

CASCA

Ay, if I be alive and your mind hold and your dinner
worth the eating.

CASSIUS

Good: I will expect you.

CASCA

Do so. Farewell, both.

Exit

BRUTUS

What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!
He was quick mettle when he went to school.

CASSIUS

So is he now in execution
Of any bold or noble enterprise,
However he puts on this tardy form.
This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
Which gives men stomach to digest his words
With better appetite.

BRUTUS

And so it is. For this time I will leave you:
To-morrow, if you please to speak with me,
I will come home to you; or, if you will,
Come home to me, and I will wait for you.

CASSIUS

I will do so: till then, think of the world.

Exit BRUTUS

Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see,
Thy honourable metal may be wrought
From that it is disposed: therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
For who so firm that cannot be seduced?
Caesar doth bear me hard; but he loves Brutus:
If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
He should not humour me. I will this night,
In several hands, in at his windows throw,
As if they came from several citizens,
Writings all tending to the great opinion
That Rome holds of his name; wherein obscurely
Caesar's ambition shall be glanced at:
And after this let Caesar seat him sure;
For we will shake him, or worse days endure.

Exit




Julius Caesar (Részlet) (Magyar)


A történet helye nagyrészt Róma, utóbb Sardis és Philippi környéke.



Első felvonás

1. szín

Róma. - Utca.
Flavius, Marullus s egy sereg polgár jőnek.

FLAVIUS

El, renyhe nép, lóduljatok haza.
Ünnepnap ez ma? Nem tudjátok-e,
Kézműves létetekre, hogy tilos
Hétköznap járni mesterségitek
Jelvénye nélkül? Neked mi a munkád?

ELSŐ POLGÁR

Hát, uram, én ács vagyok.

MARULLUS

Hol bőrkötényed és a mérvonal?
Mi dolgod itt most legjobbik ruhádban?
S te itt miféle műves vagy?

MÁSODIK POLGÁR

Biz’, uram, finom műveshez képest én úgyszólván csak kontár vagyok.

MARULLUS

De mi mesterséget űzöl? Ki vele!

MÁSODIK POLGÁR

Oly mű az, uram, melyet a legjobb lélekkel űzhetek, ami valóban nem egyéb, mint
a rossz viselet megjavítója.

FLAVIUS

De mi az, te semmirekellő, szólj, miféle mű?

MÁSODIK POLGÁR

Ne, kérlek, uram, ki ne kelj ellenem, de ha valamidből ki találnál kelni, én
helyrehozhatlak.

MARULLUS

Te helyrehozhatsz, szemtelen fiú?

MÁSODIK POLGÁR

Igen, uram, megfoldalak.

FLAVIUS

Te csizmafoltozó vagy, nemde?

MÁSODIK POLGÁR

Biz’, uram, én minden életszükségeim árát árral szerzem; én nem ártom magamat
sem a mesteremberek közé, sem az asszonyi dolgokba egyébbel, mint árral.
Igazán szólva, én az öreg lábbelik seborvosa vagyok: ha nagy veszélyben vannak,
kigyógyítom őket. Oly derék nép járdogál az én két kezem művein, amilyen csak
valaha marhabőrt tapodott.

FLAVIUS

De mért ma műhelyedben nem maradsz?
Mért hordod e népséget fel s alá?

MÁSODIK POLGÁR

Igazán, uram, csak hogy csizmáik kopjanak, s munkám szaporodjék. De
valósággal, uram, azért ünnepelünk ma, hogy Caesart láthassuk s örüljünk
diadalán.

MARULLUS

Örülni? mért? mi zsákmányt hoz haza?
Vagy mely adózók jőnek, szekerét
Rabláncaikban ékesíteni?
Ti fák, szirtek! gonoszbak mindazoknál!
Ó, rög szivek, Rómának vad fiai,
Nem ismerétek Pompejust? Mi sokszor
Mászkáltatok fel falra, várfokokra,
Ablak- s toronyra, sőt kéménytetőkre
Emőitekkel és ott ültetek
Reggeltől estig, békén várakozva,
Láthatni nagy Pompejus menetét
Rómának utcáin! S ha szekere
Csak feltünék is, nem kezdétek-e
Köz zendüléssel oly örömkiáltást,
Hogy pandalainak visszhangzásira,
Miket ujjongástok ébresztett fel ott,
Megreszketett ágyában Tiberis?
S ti most még jobb ruhákat öltetek?
S ti most még ünnepeltek, és ti most
Virágot szórtok annak útain,
Ki diadalmat ül Pompejusvér fölött?
El innen! Tüstént menjetek haza.
Az istenekhez térden esdjetek,
Hogy a villámot feltartsák, minek
Lecsapni kell e háladatlanságra.

FLAVIUS

El, el, jó földiek, s e vétekért
Gyűjtsétek össze sorstársaitokat
A Tiberishez; sírjátok vizébe
Könyűitek, mig a legaljasabb ár
A legfőbb partot csókolandja meg.

Nép el.

Nézd, hogy megolvadt bennök a salak;
Eltűntek, megnémulva bűneikben.
Eredj te most a Capitol felé.
Én erre tartok. Foszd a szobrokat,
Ha melyeket díszjellel fedve látsz.

MARULLUS

Tehetjük ezt?
Tudod, ma vannak a Lupercaliák.

FLAVIUS

Sebaj! Ne hagyd Caesarnak díszjelét
Semilyen szobrán. Én körülmegyek.
S elűzöm utcáról a pórokat.
Tedd ezt te is, hol tömve látod őket.
Alant repűlend Caesar, szárnyiból
E nőni kezdő toll ha tépve lesz:
Különben túlszáll ember látkörén,
S mindünket szolga félelembe fojt.

El.

2. Szín

Ugyanott. - Köztér.
Versenyre készülten jőnek díszjárattal s zenével
Caesar, Antonius, Calpurnia, Portia, Decius, Cicero, Brutus, Cassius, Casca;
utánok nagy csoport s köztük egy jós.

CAESAR

Calpurnia!

CASCA

Csendesen, hejh! Caesar szól.

A zene megszűn.

CAESAR

Calpurnia!

CALPURNIA

Itt vagyok, uram.

CAESAR

Antoniusnak álld egészen útját,
Ha majd pályát futand. Antonius!

ANTONIUS

Caesar, uram?

CAESAR

Megemlékezzél versenyed között
Calpurniát illetni. Őseink
Mondásaként a magtalan, ha íly
Szent pálya közben érintik, lerázza
A meddőségnek átkát.

ANTONIUS

Nem felejtem.

Ha Caesar mondja: tedd, az téve van.

CAESAR

Kezdjétek. S minden rend szerint legyen.

Zene.

JÓS

Caesar!

CAESAR

Hah! ki szólít?

CASCA

Csendet körül! Hallgasson el ki-ki.

Zene megszűn.

CAESAR

Ki az, ki hozzám szól a sokaságból?
Egy hang visítja Caesart, a zenén is
Túl hatva. Szólj, Caesar kész hallani.

JÓS

Őrizkedjél Martius idusától.

CAESAR

Mi ember ez?

BRUTUS

Egy jós tanácsolja ónod magadat Martius idusától.

CAESAR

Hadd lássam arcát, hozzátok közelb.

CASSIUS

Fickó! Jöjj ki a csoportból, tekints Caesarra.

CAESAR

Mit szólsz nekem most. Mondd még egyszer el.

JÓS

Őrizkedjél Martius idusától.

CAESAR

Ábrándozó, bocsássuk őt. - Eredj.

Harsonák. Mind el, Cassius és Brutuson kívül.

CASSIUS

Nem jössz megnézni a versenyt?

BRUTUS

Nem én.

CASSIUS

Jöjj, kérlek.

BRUTUS

Játék barátja nem vagyok. Kevés van
A fürgeségből bennem, mely jutott
Antoniusnak. Ám ez fel ne tartson
Kivánatodban; én magadra hagylak.

CASSIUS

Régóta, Brutus, szemmel tartalak.
Te nem tekintesz oly nyájas szemekkel,
Sem szívességet többé nem mutatsz,
Milyenhez szokva voltam; szigorún
Zord vagy barátodhoz, aki szeret.

BRUTUS

Csalatkozol. Ha arcom elsötétült,
Lelkem borúja csak magamra tér.
Sokféle szenvedély bánt egy kor óta
És ötletek, csupán nekem valók,
Mi tetteimre tán homályt borít;
De ez ne bántsa meg barátimat,
(Kiknek sorában egy vagy, Cassius),
Se másra múlasztásimat ne értsék,
Mint hogy magával Brutus lelke küzd
És nyájas lenni máshoz elfelejt.

CASSIUS

Így félreértém bomlott kedvedet,
Miért is e keblembe sok nyomós
Szándékot s méltó gondot eltemettem.
Mondd, láthatod-e, jó Brutus, arcodat?

BRUTUS

Nem, Cassius, mert a szem önmagát
Nem látja, csak más tárgyról visszavert
Sugárok által.

CASSIUS

Úgy vagyon.

S felette kár, Brutus, hogy nincsenek
Ily tükreid, honnan rejtett becsed
Szemedbe tűnnék, s látnád másodat.
Hallám, miképp sok fő-fő római
(A halhatatlan Caesaron kivűl)
Brutusról szólva s e kor járma súlyát
Nyögvén, ohajtá: vajha a nemes
Brutus szemekkel bírna.

BRUTUS

Mily veszélybe

Vezetsz te engem, azt kivánva, hogy
Olyat keressek bennem, ami nincs?

CASSIUS

Készülj azért, jó Brutus, hallani.
És tudva, hogy nem láthatod magad
Oly jól, mint tükröződve, tükröd, én,
Szerényen felfödöm magadnak azt,
Mit még magadról nem tudsz. És ne légy
Ezért gyanúval, Brutus, ellenem.
Ha köznevetkező, s ha szokva volnék
Hálálkodókra szívességemet
Pór esküvéssel elpazarlani,
S ha észrevetted, hogy hizelkedém
Embernek, és forrón ölelgetém
S aztán gyaláztam, vagy hogy tor között
Egész csoportnak megnyilatkozom,
Ugy óvakozzál tőlem.

Harsonák és zaj.

BRUTUS

Mit jelent ez

Örömkiáltás? Tartok tőle, hogy
Caesart a nép királlyá emeli.

CASSIUS

Igen, te tartasz? Úgy azt kell gyanítnom,
Hogy nem szeretnéd.

BRUTUS

Azt nem, Cassius;

De őt én kedvelem. Hanem miért
Tartasz te engem ily sokáig itt?
Mi az, mit vágyásod van közleni?
Ha közjót illet, tégy becsűletet
Egyik s halált a másik szem elé,
S én mind a kettőt egy kedvvel tekintem.
Mert istenek úgy segítsenek, miként
Inkább imádom a becsűletet,
Mint félem a halált.

CASSIUS

Ismérem benned, Brutus, ez erényt,
Éppen miként külsődet ismerem.
Igen tehát, becsűlet tárgya szómnak.
Nem mondhatom, te s más mit tartotok
Az életről; nekem, magamra nézve,
Nem lenni éppen oly kivánatos,
Mint élni rémben olytól, mint magam.
Szabadul születtem, mint Caesar, s te is;
Mindketten szinte jól táplálkozánk
S kiálljuk, mint ő, a tél hidegét.
Mert egykor egy zord, szélveszes napon,
Tiber hulláma küzdvén partival,
Így szóla Caesar: „Mersz-e most velem
A bősz habokba szállni, Cassius,
S amott a pontig úszni?” E szavakra,
Fegyverben, mint valék, belészökém,
S intém, kövessen. És ő követett.
Dühödt az ár s mi vertük, gyors inakkal
Hadarva félre és dacos kebellel
Előrenyomván. Ám, még mielőtt
A feltett ponthoz érnénk: „Cassius!”
Kiált Caesar, „Segíts, vagy elbukom.”
Én, mint nagy ősünk, Aeneas, kihozta
Hátán az agg Anchisest láng közül,
Úgy hoztam a fáradt Caesart Tiberis
Hullámiból. S most istenné leve
Ez ember, s Cassius hitvány teremtmény,
Kinek fejét mélyen kell hajtani,
Ha Caesar csak ugy odaint feléje.
Hispániában egykor láz gyötörte,
Reszketni láttam őt, midőn
Rohamja jött; ez isten reszketett!
A gyáva ajkak színöket hagyák
S azon szem, melytől a világ remeg,
Fényét veszíté. Hallám nyögni őt;
Igen! s azon nyelv, mely Rómát köti,
Hogy rá figyeljen és beszédeit
Könyvébe rója, az most így nyögött:
„Adj innom, ah, Titinius”,
Mint egy beteg leány. Ó, istenek!
Bámulnom kell, hogy ily gyarló egy ember
Elébe vágott a dicső világnak
S a pálmát bírja egyedül.

Zaj. Harsonák.

BRUTUS

Köz-felkiáltás ismét; úgy hiszem,
E tapsok új tisztesség jelei,
Melyekkel Caesar elboríttatik.

CASSIUS

Ó, mint coloss lép ő a szűk világon,
S kis emberek, mi, roppant szárai
Alatt bolyongva, széttekingetünk,
Gyalázatos sirunkat keresők.
Sorsának ember néha mestere.
Nem csillaginkban, Brutus, a hiba,
Hanem magunkban, kik megbókolunk.
Caesar vagy Brutus! Caesarban mi van?
Mért volna hangzóbb e név, mint tiéd?
Írd össze s szintoly ékes lesz neved;
Mondd és a szájnak szintúgy jólesik
Mérd s szinte oly nehéz; idézz vele
S lelket hivand fel Brutus, mint amaz.

Zaj.

Egyszerre minden istenek nevében!
Ugyan miféle táppal él e Caesar,
Hogy ilyen nagyra nőtt? Ó, kor, gyalázva vagy,
Nemes fajodban, Róma, megfogyál!
A vízözöntől fogva múlt-e kor,
Csupán egy s nem több férfival jeles?
Ha mondhaták Rómáról mostanig,
Hogy tág terén egy ember fér csak el?
Valóban, Róma tágas, puszta rom,
Ha benne nincsen több egy férfinál.
Ó, én s te hallók őseink szavából:
Egy Brutus élt hajdan, ki Róma földén
A véghetetlen ördög udvarát
Szenvedte volna inkább, mint királyt.

BRUTUS

Hogy engem kedvelsz, nem kétlem: miket
Tennem kivánsz, gyaníthatom. Miként
Elmélkedém ezekről és korunkról,
Majd elbeszélem. Most, ha szívesen
Kérnem szabad, ne késztenél tovább.
Amit mondál, meggondolom; mi még
Van mondandód, békén kihallgatom
S időt lelendek, alkalmast reá,
Hogy megvitassunk ily fő dolgokat.
Addig, nemes barátom, tartsd eszedben,
Hogy Brutus inkább lenne pór falun,
Mint Róma gyermekeinek egyike
Ilyen kemény feltétekkel, minőket
Az idő ránk vetni készül.

CASSIUSS

S én örűlök,

Hogy gyenge szóm Brutusnak kebliből
Csak ennyi szikrát is kifejthetett.

Caesar és kísérete visszajő.

BRUTUS

Lefolyt a játék, s Caesar visszatér.

CASSIUS

Ha erre jőnek, rántsd meg Casca ujját
S fanyar szeszéllyel ő majd elbeszéli,
Mi történt, méltó megjegyzésre, ma.

BRUTUS

Azt megteszem; de nézzed, Cassius:
Haragfolt ég Caesarnak homlokán,
S a többi úgy néz, mint a vert cseléd.
Calpurnia arca sápadt s Cicero
Oly rőt s tüzes szemekkel néz körül,
Mint a Capitoliumban láttuk őt, midőn
Vitában állott a szenátorokkal.

CASSIUS

Elmondja Casca majd, mi történt.

CAESAR

Antonius!

ANTONIUS

Caesar!

CAESAR

Tedd, hogy kövér nép foglaljon körül,
És síkfejű s kik éjjel alszanak.
E Cassius ott sovány, éhes szinű;
Sokat tünődik s ily ember veszélyes.

ANTONIUS

Ne féljed, Caesar, nem veszélyes az.
Derék és jóérzelmü római.

CAESAR

Mért nem kövérebb? Bár nem félem őt,
S mégis, ha nevemhez férne félelem,
Nem ösmerek, kit inkább kellene
Kerülnöm, mint e fonnyadt Cassiust.
Szünetlen olvas; nagy figyelmező;
Átlát az embereknek tettein.
Játéknak nem barátja, mint te vagy,
Antonius; nem hallgat muzsikát.
Ritkán mosolyg s mintegy magát csufolva
S eszét gyalázva akkor is, hogy azt
Akármi tárgy mosolyra bírhatá.
Ily embereknek nyugta nincs soha,
Amíg nagyobbat látnak, mint magok,
Azért is ők igen veszélyesek.
Inkább beszélem, ami félhető,
Mint ami rettent: én Caesar vagyok.
Jöjj jobb felemre; bal fülem nagyot hall;
S mondd el valólag, mit tartasz felőle.

Caesar és kísérői el. Casca hátramarad.

CASCA

Palástomat megrántátok; beszédtek van velem?

BRUTUS

Mondd el nekünk, mi történt, Casca, most,
Hogy Caesar oly setét tekintetű?

CASCA

Hiszen ti is vele voltatok, vagy nem?

BRUTUS

Nem kérdeném úgy Cascától, mi történt.

CASCA

Hát koronával kínálták meg, s meg levén vele kínálva, ő azt keze fejével
félretolta, így, s a nép ujjongatott.

BRUTUS

Mért volt a második zaj?

CASCA

Hát megint ezért.

CASSIUS

Háromszor ujjongtak; miért a végkiáltás.

CASCA

Hát megint ezért.

BRUTUS

Háromszor ajánltatott neki a korona?

CASCA

Háromszor, ha mondom. S ő azt háromszor tolta vissza, mindig szelídebben, mint
előbb, s az én becsületes szomszédaim minden visszatoláskor sivalkodtak.

CASSIUS

Ki nyújtá neki a koronát?

CASCA

Hát Antonius.

BRUTUS

Jó Casca, mondd el rendét és sorát.

CASCA

Akasszanak fel, ha én nektek rendét, sorát megmondhatom: csupa bolondság
volt, nem vigyáztam reá. Láttam Marcus Antoniust, hogy koronát ajánlott neki:
tulajdonképpen nem is korona volt, hanem csak afféle párta. - S amint mondám,
ő azt először félretolá; mindamellett, úgy gondolom, igen örömest elvette volna.
Azután ismét odanyújtá neki, s ő ismét félretolá; de, úgy gondolom, igen nehezen
esett ujjait róla levennie. Azután harmadízben nyújtá neki, s ő harmadszor is
félretolá. S valahányszor lemondott róla, a gyülevész felsivalkodott, összeverte
kérges tenyereit, felhányta izzadságos hálósipkáit, s oly temérdek büdös lélegzetet
bocsátott ki, mivel Caesar megveté a koronát, hogy Caesar szinte megfúlt belé,
mert arra elájult és lerogyott. Részemről nem mertem nevetni, félvén, hogy ha
szájamat kinyitom, teleszívom magamat romlott levegővel.

CASSIUS

Kérlek, megállj; elájult volna Caesar?

CASCA

Lerogyott a vásártéren, habot túrt szája, s a szava is elállt.

BRUTUS

Az meglehet; nehézség gyötri őt.

CASSIUS

Nem, őt nem; minket, engem s tégedet
S téged, jó Casca, sujtol a nehézség.

CASCA

Nem tudom, hogy érted; annyi bizonyos, hogy Caesar lerogyott. De ha a gizgaz
nép meg nem tapsolta s pisszegette őt, amint tetszett vagy nem tetszett nekik,
miként az alakosokkal a színen szokott tenni, ne legyek becsületes ember.

BRUTUS

Mit szólt, hogy ismét eszméletre jött?

CASCA

Nos hát, mielőtt lerogyott, látván a közcsoportot örvendeni azon, hogy ő a koronát
visszavetette, megnyitá mellruháját, s odamutatá torkát, hogy messék el. És ha
én valamiféle kézmíves volnék, szálljak pokolra a gonoszokkal, ha szaván nem
fogtam volna. S így lerogyott. S mikor ismét magához tért, monda: ha szóval vagy
tettel valami hibát követett volna el, óhajtaná, hogy azt ő nagyságok e bajának
tulajdonítanák. Három vagy négy szajha, hol állék, kiáltá: „Ah, a jó lélek!”, s
teljes szívökből megbocsátának neki; de ez nem sok figyelmet érdemel: ha Caesar
anyjaikat döfte volna is le, nem tesznek vala kevesebbet.

BRUTUS

És erre ment ő oly sötéten el?

CASCA

Igen.

CASSIUS

Szólt Cicero is valamit?

CASCA

Igen, görögül beszélt.

BRUTUS

S hova vágott vele?

CASCA

Ha én azt nektek megmondom, soha ne nézzek többé szemetekbe. Azok, kik
értették, egymásra mosolyogtak, és csóválták fejöket; de, mi engem illet, nekem
az görögül volt. Több újságot is mondhatok nektek: Flavius és Marullus, Caesar
szobra díszjeleinek lerángatásáért, hűvösre tétettek. Éljetek boldogul. Több
bohóság is volt még, ha emlékezném reá.

CASSIUS

Eljössz ma hozzám estebédre, Casca?

CASCA

Nem, el vagyok ígérkezve.

CASSIUS

Eljössz ebédre holnap?

CASCA

Igen, ha élek, s te szándékod mellett maradsz, s étkeid méltók a megevésre.

CASSIUS

Jó! elvárlak.

CASCA

Azt tedd. Ég veletek!

Casca el.

BRUTUS

Mi lomha fickó vált ebből? Tüzes,
Fürgenc fiú volt iskolás korában.

CASSIUS

Az ő ma is, ha végrehajtani
Kell nagy s nemes merényeket, noha
E lomha képet öltözé magára;
E durvaság a mártás ép eszén,
Mely a gyomort késziti, hogy szavait
Jobb ízüen költhessük el.

BRUTUS

Úgy van. De most megyek; holnap ha tán
Beszélni vágysz velem, hozzád megyek;
Avagy ha tetszik, jöjj hozzám s bevárlak.

CASSIUS

Jövök s te addig töprengj a világon.

Brutus el.

Nemes szivű vagy, Brutus, ám, hiszem,
Természeted más útra fogható,
Mint melyre hajlik. Azért kivánatos,
Hogy a nemes nemessel frígyesüljön.
Ki oly erős, hogy nem csábítható?
Sújt Caesar engem, Brutust kedveli.
De volnék Brutus én s ő Cassius,
Nem tántorítna meg. Ma éjszaka
Többféle írást, mintha több külön
Polgártól jőne, hányok ablakába,
Mind arra célzót, mily nagy véleménnyel
Vagyon nevéhez Róma; benne titkon
Érintve lesz Caesar dicsvágya is.
S hadd üljön aztán Caesar biztosan:
Megrázzuk őt, vagy rosszabb kort türünk.

El.



KiadóEurópa, RTV
Az idézet forrásaWilliam Shakespeare: Julius Caesar

minimap