Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Shakespeare, William: Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Detail)

Shakespeare, William portréja

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Detail) (Angol)


ACT III.

SCENE I.

A room in the castle.

Enter KING CLAUDIUS, QUEEN GERTRUDE, POLONIUS, OPHELIA, ROSENCRANTZ, and GUILDENSTERN



KING CLAUDIUS

And can you, by no drift of circumstance,
Get from him why he puts on this confusion,
Grating so harshly all his days of quiet
With turbulent and dangerous lunacy?

ROSENCRANTZ

He does confess he feels himself distracted;
But from what cause he will by no means speak.

GUILDENSTERN

Nor do we find him forward to be sounded,
But, with a crafty madness, keeps aloof,
When we would bring him on to some confession
Of his true state.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Did he receive you well?

ROSENCRANTZ

Most like a gentleman.

GUILDENSTERN

But with much forcing of his disposition.

ROSENCRANTZ

Niggard of question; but, of our demands,
Most free in his reply.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Did you assay him?
To any pastime?

ROSENCRANTZ

Madam, it so fell out, that certain players
We o'er-raught on the way: of these we told him;
And there did seem in him a kind of joy
To hear of it: they are about the court,
And, as I think, they have already order
This night to play before him.

LORD POLONIUS

'Tis most true:
And he beseech'd me to entreat your majesties
To hear and see the matter.

KING CLAUDIUS

With all my heart; and it doth much content me
To hear him so inclined.
Good gentlemen, give him a further edge,
And drive his purpose on to these delights.

ROSENCRANTZ

We shall, my lord.

Exeunt ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN

KING CLAUDIUS

Sweet Gertrude, leave us too;
For we have closely sent for Hamlet hither,
That he, as 'twere by accident, may here
Affront Ophelia:
Her father and myself, lawful espials,
Will so bestow ourselves that, seeing, unseen,
We may of their encounter frankly judge,
And gather by him, as he is behaved,
If 't be the affliction of his love or no
That thus he suffers for.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

I shall obey you.
And for your part, Ophelia, I do wish
That your good beauties be the happy cause
Of Hamlet's wildness: so shall I hope your virtues
Will bring him to his wonted way again,
To both your honours.

OPHELIA

Madam, I wish it may.

Exit QUEEN GERTRUDE

LORD POLONIUS

Ophelia, walk you here. Gracious, so please you,
We will bestow ourselves.

To OPHELIA

Read on this book;
That show of such an exercise may colour
Your loneliness. We are oft to blame in this,--
'Tis too much proved--that with devotion's visage
And pious action we do sugar o'er
The devil himself.

KING CLAUDIUS

[Aside] O, 'tis too true!
How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience!
The harlot's cheek, beautied with plastering art,
Is not more ugly to the thing that helps it
Than is my deed to my most painted word:
O heavy burthen!

LORD POLONIUS

I hear him coming: let's withdraw, my lord.

Exeunt KING CLAUDIUS and POLONIUS

Enter HAMLET

HAMLET

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.--Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd.

OPHELIA

Good my lord,
How does your honour for this many a day?

HAMLET

I humbly thank you; well, well, well.

OPHELIA

My lord, I have remembrances of yours,
That I have longed long to re-deliver;
I pray you, now receive them.

HAMLET

No, not I;
I never gave you aught.

OPHELIA

My honour'd lord, you know right well you did;
And, with them, words of so sweet breath composed
As made the things more rich: their perfume lost,
Take these again; for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.
There, my lord.

HAMLET

Ha, ha! are you honest?

OPHELIA

My lord?

HAMLET

Are you fair?

OPHELIA

What means your lordship?

HAMLET

That if you be honest and fair, your honesty should
admit no discourse to your beauty.

OPHELIA

Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than
with honesty?

HAMLET

Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
transform honesty from what it is to a bawd than the
force of honesty can translate beauty into his
likeness: this was sometime a paradox, but now the
time gives it proof. I did love you once.

OPHELIA

Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.

HAMLET

You should not have believed me; for virtue cannot
so inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of
it: I loved you not.

OPHELIA

I was the more deceived.

HAMLET

Get thee to a nunnery: why wouldst thou be a
breeder of sinners? I am myself indifferent honest;
but yet I could accuse me of such things that it
were better my mother had not borne me: I am very
proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at
my beck than I have thoughts to put them in,
imagination to give them shape, or time to act them
in. What should such fellows as I do crawling
between earth and heaven? We are arrant knaves,
all; believe none of us. Go thy ways to a nunnery.
Where's your father?

OPHELIA

At home, my lord.

HAMLET

Let the doors be shut upon him, that he may play the
fool no where but in's own house. Farewell.

OPHELIA

O, help him, you sweet heavens!

HAMLET

If thou dost marry, I'll give thee this plague for
thy dowry: be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as
snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. Get thee to a
nunnery, go: farewell. Or, if thou wilt needs
marry, marry a fool; for wise men know well enough
what monsters you make of them. To a nunnery, go,
and quickly too. Farewell.

OPHELIA

O heavenly powers, restore him!

HAMLET

I have heard of your paintings too, well enough; God
has given you one face, and you make yourselves
another: you jig, you amble, and you lisp, and
nick-name God's creatures, and make your wantonness
your ignorance. Go to, I'll no more on't; it hath
made me mad. I say, we will have no more marriages:
those that are married already, all but one, shall
live; the rest shall keep as they are. To a
nunnery, go.

Exit

OPHELIA

O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!
The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword;
The expectancy and rose of the fair state,
The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
The observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,
That suck'd the honey of his music vows,
Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,
Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;
That unmatch'd form and feature of blown youth
Blasted with ecstasy: O, woe is me,
To have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

Re-enter KING CLAUDIUS and POLONIUS

KING CLAUDIUS

Love! his affections do not that way tend;
Nor what he spake, though it lack'd form a little,
Was not like madness. There's something in his soul,
O'er which his melancholy sits on brood;
And I do doubt the hatch and the disclose
Will be some danger: which for to prevent,
I have in quick determination
Thus set it down: he shall with speed to England,
For the demand of our neglected tribute
Haply the seas and countries different
With variable objects shall expel
This something-settled matter in his heart,
Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus
From fashion of himself. What think you on't?

LORD POLONIUS

It shall do well: but yet do I believe
The origin and commencement of his grief
Sprung from neglected love. How now, Ophelia!
You need not tell us what Lord Hamlet said;
We heard it all. My lord, do as you please;
But, if you hold it fit, after the play
Let his queen mother all alone entreat him
To show his grief: let her be round with him;
And I'll be placed, so please you, in the ear
Of all their conference. If she find him not,
To England send him, or confine him where
Your wisdom best shall think.

KING CLAUDIUS

It shall be so:
Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go.

Exeunt





ACT III. SCENE II. A hall in the castle.

Enter HAMLET and Players

HAMLET

Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to
you, trippingly on the tongue: but if you mouth it,
as many of your players do, I had as lief the
town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air
too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently;
for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say,
the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget
a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it
offends me to the soul to hear a robustious
periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to
very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who
for the most part are capable of nothing but
inexplicable dumbshows and noise: I would have such
a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it
out-herods Herod: pray you, avoid it.

First Player

I warrant your honour.

HAMLET

Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion
be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the
word to the action; with this special o'erstep not
the modesty of nature: for any thing so overdone is
from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the
first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the
mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature,
scorn her own image, and the very age and body of
the time his form and pressure. Now this overdone,
or come tardy off, though it make the unskilful
laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve; the
censure of the which one must in your allowance
o'erweigh a whole theatre of others. O, there be
players that I have seen play, and heard others
praise, and that highly, not to speak it profanely,
that, neither having the accent of Christians nor
the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so
strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of
nature's journeymen had made men and not made them
well, they imitated humanity so abominably.

First Player

I hope we have reformed that indifferently with us,
sir.

HAMLET

O, reform it altogether. And let those that play
your clowns speak no more than is set down for them;
for there be of them that will themselves laugh, to
set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh
too; though, in the mean time, some necessary
question of the play be then to be considered:
that's villanous, and shows a most pitiful ambition
in the fool that uses it. Go, make you ready.

Exeunt Players

Enter POLONIUS, ROSENCRANTZ, and GUILDENSTERN

How now, my lord! I will the king hear this piece of work?

LORD POLONIUS

And the queen too, and that presently.

HAMLET

Bid the players make haste.

Exit POLONIUS

Will you two help to hasten them?

ROSENCRANTZ GUILDENSTERN

We will, my lord.

Exeunt ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN

HAMLET

What ho! Horatio!

Enter HORATIO

HORATIO

Here, sweet lord, at your service.

HAMLET

Horatio, thou art e'en as just a man
As e'er my conversation coped withal.

HORATIO

O, my dear lord,--

HAMLET

Nay, do not think I flatter;
For what advancement may I hope from thee
That no revenue hast but thy good spirits,
To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd?
No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp,
And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee
Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear?
Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice
And could of men distinguish, her election
Hath seal'd thee for herself; for thou hast been
As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing,
A man that fortune's buffets and rewards
Hast ta'en with equal thanks: and blest are those
Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled,
That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger
To sound what stop she please. Give me that man
That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
As I do thee.--Something too much of this.--
There is a play to-night before the king;
One scene of it comes near the circumstance
Which I have told thee of my father's death:
I prithee, when thou seest that act afoot,
Even with the very comment of thy soul
Observe mine uncle: if his occulted guilt
Do not itself unkennel in one speech,
It is a damned ghost that we have seen,
And my imaginations are as foul
As Vulcan's stithy. Give him heedful note;
For I mine eyes will rivet to his face,
And after we will both our judgments join
In censure of his seeming.

HORATIO

Well, my lord:
If he steal aught the whilst this play is playing,
And 'scape detecting, I will pay the theft.

HAMLET

They are coming to the play; I must be idle:
Get you a place.

Danish march. A flourish. Enter KING CLAUDIUS, QUEEN GERTRUDE, POLONIUS, OPHELIA, ROSENCRANTZ, GUILDENSTERN, and others

KING CLAUDIUS

How fares our cousin Hamlet?

HAMLET

Excellent, i' faith; of the chameleon's dish: I eat
the air, promise-crammed: you cannot feed capons so.

KING CLAUDIUS

I have nothing with this answer, Hamlet; these words
are not mine.

HAMLET

No, nor mine now.

To POLONIUS

My lord, you played once i' the university, you say?

LORD POLONIUS

That did I, my lord; and was accounted a good actor.

HAMLET

What did you enact?

LORD POLONIUS

I did enact Julius Caesar: I was killed i' the
Capitol; Brutus killed me.

HAMLET

It was a brute part of him to kill so capital a calf
there. Be the players ready?

ROSENCRANTZ

Ay, my lord; they stay upon your patience.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Come hither, my dear Hamlet, sit by me.

HAMLET

No, good mother, here's metal more attractive.

LORD POLONIUS

[To KING CLAUDIUS] O, ho! do you mark that?

HAMLET

Lady, shall I lie in your lap?

Lying down at OPHELIA's feet

OPHELIA

No, my lord.

HAMLET

I mean, my head upon your lap?

OPHELIA

Ay, my lord.

HAMLET

Do you think I meant country matters?

OPHELIA

I think nothing, my lord.

HAMLET

That's a fair thought to lie between maids' legs.

OPHELIA

What is, my lord?

HAMLET

Nothing.

OPHELIA

You are merry, my lord.

HAMLET

Who, I?

OPHELIA

Ay, my lord.

HAMLET

O God, your only jig-maker. What should a man do
but be merry? for, look you, how cheerfully my
mother looks, and my father died within these two hours.

OPHELIA

Nay, 'tis twice two months, my lord.

HAMLET

So long? Nay then, let the devil wear black, for
I'll have a suit of sables. O heavens! die two
months ago, and not forgotten yet? Then there's
hope a great man's memory may outlive his life half
a year: but, by'r lady, he must build churches,
then; or else shall he suffer not thinking on, with
the hobby-horse, whose epitaph is 'For, O, for, O,
the hobby-horse is forgot.'

Hautboys play. The dumb-show enters

Enter a King and a Queen very lovingly; the Queen embracing him, and he her. She kneels, and makes show of protestation unto him. He takes her up, and declines his head upon her neck: lays him down upon a bank of flowers: she, seeing him asleep, leaves him. Anon comes in a fellow, takes off his crown, kisses it, and pours poison in the King's ears, and exit. The Queen returns; finds the King dead, and makes passionate action. The Poisoner, with some two or three Mutes, comes in again, seeming to lament with her. The dead body is carried away. The Poisoner wooes the Queen with gifts: she seems loath and unwilling awhile, but in the end accepts his love

Exeunt

OPHELIA

What means this, my lord?

HAMLET

Marry, this is miching mallecho; it means mischief.

OPHELIA

Belike this show imports the argument of the play.

Enter Prologue

HAMLET

We shall know by this fellow: the players cannot
keep counsel; they'll tell all.

OPHELIA

Will he tell us what this show meant?

HAMLET

Ay, or any show that you'll show him: be not you
ashamed to show, he'll not shame to tell you what it means.

OPHELIA

You are naught, you are naught: I'll mark the play.

Prologue

For us, and for our tragedy,
Here stooping to your clemency,
We beg your hearing patiently.

Exit

HAMLET

Is this a prologue, or the posy of a ring?

OPHELIA

'Tis brief, my lord.

HAMLET

As woman's love.

Enter two Players, King and Queen

Player King

Full thirty times hath Phoebus' cart gone round
Neptune's salt wash and Tellus' orbed ground,
And thirty dozen moons with borrow'd sheen
About the world have times twelve thirties been,
Since love our hearts and Hymen did our hands
Unite commutual in most sacred bands.

Player Queen

So many journeys may the sun and moon
Make us again count o'er ere love be done!
But, woe is me, you are so sick of late,
So far from cheer and from your former state,
That I distrust you. Yet, though I distrust,
Discomfort you, my lord, it nothing must:
For women's fear and love holds quantity;
In neither aught, or in extremity.
Now, what my love is, proof hath made you know;
And as my love is sized, my fear is so:
Where love is great, the littlest doubts are fear;
Where little fears grow great, great love grows there.

Player King

'Faith, I must leave thee, love, and shortly too;
My operant powers their functions leave to do:
And thou shalt live in this fair world behind,
Honour'd, beloved; and haply one as kind
For husband shalt thou--

Player Queen

O, confound the rest!
Such love must needs be treason in my breast:
In second husband let me be accurst!
None wed the second but who kill'd the first.

HAMLET

[Aside] Wormwood, wormwood.

Player Queen

The instances that second marriage move
Are base respects of thrift, but none of love:
A second time I kill my husband dead,
When second husband kisses me in bed.

Player King

I do believe you think what now you speak;
But what we do determine oft we break.
Purpose is but the slave to memory,
Of violent birth, but poor validity;
Which now, like fruit unripe, sticks on the tree;
But fall, unshaken, when they mellow be.
Most necessary 'tis that we forget
To pay ourselves what to ourselves is debt:
What to ourselves in passion we propose,
The passion ending, doth the purpose lose.
The violence of either grief or joy
Their own enactures with themselves destroy:
Where joy most revels, grief doth most lament;
Grief joys, joy grieves, on slender accident.
This world is not for aye, nor 'tis not strange
That even our loves should with our fortunes change;
For 'tis a question left us yet to prove,
Whether love lead fortune, or else fortune love.
The great man down, you mark his favourite flies;
The poor advanced makes friends of enemies.
And hitherto doth love on fortune tend;
For who not needs shall never lack a friend,
And who in want a hollow friend doth try,
Directly seasons him his enemy.
But, orderly to end where I begun,
Our wills and fates do so contrary run
That our devices still are overthrown;
Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own:
So think thou wilt no second husband wed;
But die thy thoughts when thy first lord is dead.

Player Queen

Nor earth to me give food, nor heaven light!
Sport and repose lock from me day and night!
To desperation turn my trust and hope!
An anchor's cheer in prison be my scope!
Each opposite that blanks the face of joy
Meet what I would have well and it destroy!
Both here and hence pursue me lasting strife,
If, once a widow, ever I be wife!

HAMLET

If she should break it now!

Player King

'Tis deeply sworn. Sweet, leave me here awhile;
My spirits grow dull, and fain I would beguile
The tedious day with sleep.

Sleeps

Player Queen

Sleep rock thy brain,
And never come mischance between us twain!

Exit

HAMLET

Madam, how like you this play?

QUEEN GERTRUDE

The lady protests too much, methinks.

HAMLET

O, but she'll keep her word.

KING CLAUDIUS

Have you heard the argument? Is there no offence in 't?

HAMLET

No, no, they do but jest, poison in jest; no offence
i' the world.

KING CLAUDIUS

What do you call the play?

HAMLET

The Mouse-trap. Marry, how? Tropically. This play
is the image of a murder done in Vienna: Gonzago is
the duke's name; his wife, Baptista: you shall see
anon; 'tis a knavish piece of work: but what o'
that? your majesty and we that have free souls, it
touches us not: let the galled jade wince, our
withers are unwrung.

Enter LUCIANUS

This is one Lucianus, nephew to the king.

OPHELIA

You are as good as a chorus, my lord.

HAMLET

I could interpret between you and your love, if I
could see the puppets dallying.

OPHELIA

You are keen, my lord, you are keen.

HAMLET

It would cost you a groaning to take off my edge.

OPHELIA

Still better, and worse.

HAMLET

So you must take your husbands. Begin, murderer;
pox, leave thy damnable faces, and begin. Come:
'the croaking raven doth bellow for revenge.'

LUCIANUS

Thoughts black, hands apt, drugs fit, and time agreeing;
Confederate season, else no creature seeing;
Thou mixture rank, of midnight weeds collected,
With Hecate's ban thrice blasted, thrice infected,
Thy natural magic and dire property,
On wholesome life usurp immediately.

Pours the poison into the sleeper's ears

HAMLET

He poisons him i' the garden for's estate. His
name's Gonzago: the story is extant, and writ in
choice Italian: you shall see anon how the murderer
gets the love of Gonzago's wife.

OPHELIA

The king rises.

HAMLET

What, frighted with false fire!

QUEEN GERTRUDE

How fares my lord?

LORD POLONIUS

Give o'er the play.

KING CLAUDIUS

Give me some light: away!

All

Lights, lights, lights!

Exeunt all but HAMLET and HORATIO

HAMLET

Why, let the stricken deer go weep,
The hart ungalled play;
For some must watch, while some must sleep:
So runs the world away.
Would not this, sir, and a forest of feathers-- if
the rest of my fortunes turn Turk with me--with two
Provincial roses on my razed shoes, get me a
fellowship in a cry of players, sir?

HORATIO

Half a share.

HAMLET

A whole one, I.
For thou dost know, O Damon dear,
This realm dismantled was
Of Jove himself; and now reigns here
A very, very--pajock.

HORATIO

You might have rhymed.

HAMLET

O good Horatio, I'll take the ghost's word for a
thousand pound. Didst perceive?

HORATIO

Very well, my lord.

HAMLET

Upon the talk of the poisoning?

HORATIO

I did very well note him.

HAMLET

Ah, ha! Come, some music! come, the recorders!
For if the king like not the comedy,
Why then, belike, he likes it not, perdy.
Come, some music!

Re-enter ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN

GUILDENSTERN

Good my lord, vouchsafe me a word with you.

HAMLET

Sir, a whole history.

GUILDENSTERN

The king, sir,--

HAMLET

Ay, sir, what of him?

GUILDENSTERN

Is in his retirement marvellous distempered.

HAMLET

With drink, sir?

GUILDENSTERN

No, my lord, rather with choler.

HAMLET

Your wisdom should show itself more richer to
signify this to his doctor; for, for me to put him
to his purgation would perhaps plunge him into far
more choler.

GUILDENSTERN

Good my lord, put your discourse into some frame and
start not so wildly from my affair.

HAMLET

I am tame, sir: pronounce.

GUILDENSTERN

The queen, your mother, in most great affliction of
spirit, hath sent me to you.

HAMLET

You are welcome.

GUILDENSTERN

Nay, good my lord, this courtesy is not of the right
breed. If it shall please you to make me a
wholesome answer, I will do your mother's
commandment: if not, your pardon and my return
shall be the end of my business.

HAMLET

Sir, I cannot.

GUILDENSTERN

What, my lord?

HAMLET

Make you a wholesome answer; my wit's diseased: but,
sir, such answer as I can make, you shall command;
or, rather, as you say, my mother: therefore no
more, but to the matter: my mother, you say,--

ROSENCRANTZ

Then thus she says; your behavior hath struck her
into amazement and admiration.

HAMLET

O wonderful son, that can so astonish a mother! But
is there no sequel at the heels of this mother's
admiration? Impart.

ROSENCRANTZ

She desires to speak with you in her closet, ere you
go to bed.

HAMLET

We shall obey, were she ten times our mother. Have
you any further trade with us?

ROSENCRANTZ

My lord, you once did love me.

HAMLET

So I do still, by these pickers and stealers.

ROSENCRANTZ

Good my lord, what is your cause of distemper? you
do, surely, bar the door upon your own liberty, if
you deny your griefs to your friend.

HAMLET

Sir, I lack advancement.

ROSENCRANTZ

How can that be, when you have the voice of the king
himself for your succession in Denmark?

HAMLET

Ay, but sir, 'While the grass grows,'--the proverb
is something musty.

Re-enter Players with recorders

O, the recorders! let me see one. To withdraw with
you:--why do you go about to recover the wind of me,
as if you would drive me into a toil?

GUILDENSTERN

O, my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too
unmannerly.

HAMLET

I do not well understand that. Will you play upon
this pipe?

GUILDENSTERN

My lord, I cannot.

HAMLET

I pray you.

GUILDENSTERN

Believe me, I cannot.

HAMLET

I do beseech you.

GUILDENSTERN

I know no touch of it, my lord.

HAMLET

'Tis as easy as lying: govern these ventages with
your lingers and thumb, give it breath with your
mouth, and it will discourse most eloquent music.
Look you, these are the stops.

GUILDENSTERN

But these cannot I command to any utterance of
harmony; I have not the skill.

HAMLET

Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of
me! You would play upon me; you would seem to know
my stops; you would pluck out the heart of my
mystery; you would sound me from my lowest note to
the top of my compass: and there is much music,
excellent voice, in this little organ; yet cannot
you make it speak. 'Sblood, do you think I am
easier to be played on than a pipe? Call me what
instrument you will, though you can fret me, yet you
cannot play upon me.

Enter POLONIUS

God bless you, sir!

LORD POLONIUS

My lord, the queen would speak with you, and
presently.

HAMLET

Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?

LORD POLONIUS

By the mass, and 'tis like a camel, indeed.

HAMLET

Methinks it is like a weasel.

LORD POLONIUS

It is backed like a weasel.

HAMLET

Or like a whale?

LORD POLONIUS

Very like a whale.

HAMLET

Then I will come to my mother by and by. They fool
me to the top of my bent. I will come by and by.

LORD POLONIUS

I will say so.

HAMLET

By and by is easily said.

Exit POLONIUS

Leave me, friends.

Exeunt all but HAMLET

Tis now the very witching time of night,
When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out
Contagion to this world: now could I drink hot blood,
And do such bitter business as the day
Would quake to look on. Soft! now to my mother.
O heart, lose not thy nature; let not ever
The soul of Nero enter this firm bosom:
Let me be cruel, not unnatural:
I will speak daggers to her, but use none;
My tongue and soul in this be hypocrites;
How in my words soever she be shent,
To give them seals never, my soul, consent!

Exit



Hamlet, dán királyfi (Részlet) (Magyar)


III/1

Szoba a kastélyban.
Király, Királyné, Polonius, Ophelia,
Rosencrantz és Guildenstern jőnek.



KIRÁLY

Hát semmi úton nem birtok eléje
Kerülni, mért ölté fel e zavart,
Roncsolva durván csendes napjait
Bomlott s veszélyes dőresége által?

ROSENCRANTZ

Bevallja: érzi ő, hogy háborog;
De hogy miért, nem mondja semmi áron.

GUILDENSTERN

Nem is találtuk könnyűnek kilesni:
Őrűlt ravaszként résen áll, mihelyt
Valódi hogyléte felől akarnánk
Belőle csalni bármi vallomást.

KIRÁLYNÉ

Jól fogadott-e?

ROSENCRANTZ

Mint kész udvaronc.

GUILDENSTERN

De nagy erőtetéssel hajlamin.

ROSENCRANTZ

Szóban fukar volt; de ha kérdezénk,

Felelni bőkezű.

KIRÁLYNÉ

Élvekbe nem

Vonátok egy kicsit?

ROSENCRANTZ

Fenséges asszony,

Történt, hogy útban egy csapat szinészt
Értünk utól, s említők ezt neki;
Minek hallása némi látható
Örömre gyújtá. Itt vannak, az udvar
Körül, s parancsuk is van, gondolom,
Hogy még ma este játsszanak előtte.

POLONIUS

Való biz’ az; s fölkéri általam
Fölségteket, nézzék s hallják meg azt
A nem-tudom-mit.

KIRÁLY

Kész szivvel; s nagyon

Örvendek ily irányán.
Csak ösztönözni kell őt, jó urak,
S unszolni kedvét ily gyönyörre folyvást.

ROSENCRANTZ

Tesszük, királyom.

Rosencrantz és Guildenstern el.

KIRÁLY

Menj, Gertrud, te is;

Mert titkon érte küldénk Hamletért,
Hogy itt találja, csak mintegy esetleg,
Opheliát; az atyja és magam
Elrejtezünk, s igy látatlan, de látva,
Bizton bíráljuk e találkozást,
S magaviseletéből hozzávetünk:
Szerelmi bú-e vagy nem, amitől
Rájött e szenvedés.

KIRÁLYNÉ

Szót fogadok.

Ophelia, rád nézve azt óhajtom,
Szépséged lett legyen a boldog ok,
Hogy Hamlet ily zavart; remélem, így
Erényed a jó útba viheti,
Mindkettőtök becsűletére.

OPHELIA

Vajha

Úgy légyen, asszonyom!

Királyné el.

POLONIUS

Járkálj te, lyányom, itt. - Fölség; ha tetszik,

Elbúhatunk. -

Opheliához.

Te meg olvass e könyvből:

Leplezze a szinlett foglalkozás,
Mért vagy magadban. - Nem hiába mondják
Sok példa van rá - hogy ájtatos arccal,
Kegyes gyakorlattal, becúkorozzuk
Magát az ördögöt.

KIRÁLY

Félre.

Nagyon igaz:

Mint sebzi váddal lelkem e beszéd!
A festett rima-kép nem undokabb
Ahhoz képest, mivel kenik-fenik,
Mint szörnyü tettem szépitő szavamhoz.
Ó, mily nehéz kő!

POLONIUS

Hallom lépteit:

Vonuljunk hátra, felséges uram.

Király és Polonius el.
Hamlet jő.

HAMLET

Lenni vagy nem lenni: az itt a kérdés.
Akkor nemesb-e a lélek, ha tűri
Balsorsa minden nyűgét s nyilait;
Vagy ha kiszáll tenger fájdalma ellen,
S fegyvert ragadva véget vet neki?
Meghalni - elszunnyadni - semmi több;
S egy álom által elvégezni mind
A szív keservét, a test eredendő,
Természetes rázkódtatásait:
Oly cél, minőt óhajthat a kegyes.
Meghalni - elszunnyadni - és alunni!
Talán álmodni: ez a bökkenő;
Mert hogy mi álmok jőnek a halálban,
Ha majd leráztuk mind e földi bajt,
Ez visszadöbbent. E meggondolás az,
Mi a nyomort oly hosszan élteti:
Mert ki viselné a kor gúny-csapásit,
Zsarnok bosszúját, gőgös ember dölyfét,
Útált szerelme kínját, pör-halasztást,
A hivatalnak packázásait,
S mind a rugást, mellyel méltatlanok
Bántalmazzák a tűrő érdemet:
Ha nyúgalomba küldhetné magát
Egy puszta tőrrel? - Ki hordaná e terheket,
Izzadva, nyögve élte fáradalmin,
Ha rettegésünk egy halál utáni
Valamitől - a nem ismert tartomány,
Melyből nem tér meg utazó - le nem
Lohasztja kedvünk, inkább tűrni a
Jelen gonoszt, mint ismeretlenek
Felé sietni? - Ekképp az öntudat
Belőlünk mind gyávát csinál,
S az elszántság természetes szinét
A gondolat halványra betegíti;
Ily kétkedés által sok nagyszerű,
Fontos merény kifordul medriből
S elveszti »tett« nevét. - De csöndesen!
A szép Ophelia jő. - Szép hölgy, imádba
Legyenek foglalva minden bűneim.

OPHELIA

Kegyelmes úr, hogy van, mióta nem

Láttam fönségedet?

HAMLET

Köszönöm alássan; jól, jól, jól.

OPHELIA

Uram, nehány emléke itt maradt,
Már rég óhajtám visszaküldeni,
Kérem, fogadja el.

HAMLET

Nem, nem. Nem adtam egyet is soha.

OPHELIA

Fönséges úr, hisz tudja, hogy adott;
S hozzá illatnak édes szavakat:
Vedd vissza, mert illatjok elapadt;
Nemes szívnek szegény a dús ajándék,
Ha az adóban nincs a régi szándék.
Itt van, fönséges úr.

HAMLET

Ha! ha! becsületes vagy?

OPHELIA

Uram!

HAMLET

Szép vagy?

OPHELIA

Hogyan, fenséges úr?

HAMLET

Mert ha becsületes vagy, szép is: nehogy szóba
álljon becsületed szépségeddel.

OPHELIA

Lehet-e a szépség, uram, jobb társaságban mint a
becsülettel?

HAMLET

Lehet bizony; mert a szépség ereje hamarább
elváltoztatja a becsületet abból ami, kerítővé,
mintsem a becsület hatalma a szépséget magához
hasonlóvá tehetné. Ez valaha paradox volt, de a
mai kor bebizonyítá. Én egykor szerettelek.

OPHELIA

Valóban, fenség, úgy hitette el velem.

HAMLET

Ne hittél volna nekem; mert hiába oltja be az erény
e mi vén törzsünket, megérzik rajtunk a vad íz. Én
nem szerettelek.

OPHELIA

Annál inkább csalódtam.

HAMLET

Eredj kolostorba; minek szaporítanál bűnősöket! Én
meglehetős becsületes vagyok: mégis oly dolgokkal
vádolhatnám magamat, hogy jobb lett volna, ha anyám
világra sem szül. Igen büszke vagyok, bosszúálló,
nagyravágyó; egy intésemre több vétek áll készen, mint
amennyi gondolatom van, hogy beleférjen, képzeletem,
hogy alakítsa, vagy időm, hogy elkövessem benne. Ily
fickók, mint én, mit is mászkáljanak ég s föld között!
Cinkos gazemberek vagyunk mindnyájan: egynek se higgy
közülünk. Menj Isten hírével, kolostorba. Hol az apád?

OPHELIA

Otthon, uram.

HAMLET

Rá kell csukni az ajtót, hogy ne játssza a bolondot
máshol, mint saját házában. Isten veled.

OPHELIA

Ó, könyörülj rajta, mennybéli jóság!

HAMLET

Ha férjhez mégy, ím, ez átkot adom jegyajándékul:
légy bár oly szűz, mint a jég, oly tiszta, mint a hó:
ne menekülhess a rágalom elől. Vonulj kolostorba menj;
Isten veled. Vagy, ha okvetlen férjhez kell menned,
menj bolondhoz, mert okos ember úgy is tudja bizony,
miféle csudát szoktatok csinálni belőle. Zárdába hát;
eredj, hamar pedig. Isten veled.

OPHELIA

Ó, ég hatalma, állítsd helyre őt!

HAMLET

Hallottam hírét, festjük is magunkat, no bizony.
Isten megáldott egy arccal, csináltok egy másikat;
lebegtek, tipegtek, selypegtek; Isten teremtéseinek
gúnyneveket adtok, s kacérságból tudatlannak mutatkoztok.
Eredj! jóllaktam már vele; az őrített meg. Nem kell több
házasság, mondom; aki már házas, egy hiján, hadd éljen;
a többi maradjon úgy, amint van. Zárdába; menj!

Hamlet el.

OPHELIA

Ó, mely dicső ész bomla össze itten!
Udvarfi, hős, tudós, szeme, kardja, nyelve;
E szép hazánk reménye és virága,
Az ízlés tükre, minta egy szoborhoz,
Figyelme tárgya minden figyelőnek,
Oda van, ím, oda!
S én legnyomorúbb minden bús hölgy között,
Ki szívtam zengő vallomási mézét,
Most e nemes, fölséges észt, miképp
Szelíd harangot, félreverve látom;
Nyilt ifjusága páratlan vonásit
Őrült rajongás által dúlva szét.
Ó, jaj nekem,
Hogy amit láttam, láttam; és viszont,
Hogy amit látok, látom az iszonyt!

A Király és Polonius jőnek.

KIRÁLY

Szerelem! nem arra tart e szenvedély!
Se a beszéd, bár egy kissé laza,
Nem volt bolondság. Van valami lelkén,
Amin kotolva űl e mélakór,
S minek kikölte és felpattanása
Veszélybe dönthet. Azt, hogy megelőzzem,
Gyors eltökéléssel így gondolám:
Menjen sietve Angliába Hamlet,
Megkérni az elmulasztott adót:
Talán a tenger, a kültartományok
Sokféle tarka tárgya kiveri
Ezt a szivébe rögzött valamit,
Melyhez tapadt elméje kiragadja
Önnönmagából. Mit mondasz reá?

POLONIUS

Jó lesz; de mégis azt hiszem, hogy e baj
Első csirája és eredete
Szerelmi bánat. - Nos, Ophelia!
Nem kell, hogy elmondd, Hamlet mit beszélt,
Hallottuk azt mind. - Felséged magas
Tetszésitől függ, de én azt javaslom:
Királyné anyja most játék után
Hivassa bé őt, és négy szem között,
Szép szóval bírja rá, ha felfödözné
E bú okát; fogja rövíden őt;
Én meg, ha tetszik, hallgatózzam ott,
Hogy mit beszélnek. Ha nem boldogul:
Ám menjen Angliába Hamlet, vagy hová
Elcsukni jónak látja bölcseséged.

KIRÁLY

Úgy légyen; én is amellett vagyok:
Őrizve járjanak őrült nagyok.

El mind.





III/2

Terem ugyanott.
Hamlet és néhány színész jő.

HAMLET

Szavald a beszédet, kérlek, amint én ejtém előtted:
lebegve a nyelven; mert ha oly teli szájjal mondod,
mint sok szinész, akár a város dobosa kiáltná ki
verseimet. Ne is fürészeld nagyon a levegőt kezeddel,
így; hanem jártasd egészen finomul: mert a szenvedély
valódi zuhataga, szélvésze, s mondhatnám forgószele
közepett is bizonyos mérsékletre kell törekedned és
szert tenned, mi annak simaságot adjon. Ó, a lelkem
facsarodik belé, ha egy tagbaszakadt, parókás fejű
fickót hallok, hogyan tépi foszlánnyá, csupa rongyokká,
a szenvedélyt, csakhogy a földszint állók füleit
megrepessze, kiknek legnagyobb részét semmi egyéb
nem érdekli, mint kimagyarázhatatlan némajáték és
zaj. Én az ilyen fickót megcsapatnám, amiért a
dühöncöt is túlozza és heródesebb Heródesnél.
Kerüld azt, kérlek.

ELSŐ SZÍNÉSZ

Bízza rám, fönséges úr.

HAMLET

Csakhogy aztán fölötte jámbor se légy, hanem menj
saját ép érzésed vezérlete után. Illeszd a cselekvényt
a szóhoz, a szót a cselekvényhez, különösen figyelve
arra, hogy a természet szerénységét által ne hágd:
mert minden olyas túlzott dolog távol esik a színjáték
céljától, melynek föladata most és eleitől fogva
az volt és az marad, hogy tükröt tartson mintegy a
természetnek; hogy felmutassa az erénynek önábrázatát,
a gúnynak önnön képét, és maga az idő, a század
testének tulajdon alakját és lenyomatát. No már, ha
ezt túlozza valaki, vagy innen marad, bár az avatlant
megnevetteti, a hozzáértőt csak bosszanthatja; pedig
ez egynek ítélete, azt meg kell adnod, többet nyom
egy egész színház másokénál. Ó, vannak színészek, én
is láttam játszani - s hallottam dicsérve másoktól,
nagyon pedig - kik, Isten bűnül ne vegye, se
keresztény, se pogány, se általában ember hangejtését,
taghordozását nem bírva követni; úgy megdölyfösködtek,
úgy megordítoztak, hogy azt gondolám, a természet
valamely napszámosa csinált embereket, de nem csinálta
jól, oly veszettül utánozták az emberi nemet.

ELSŐ SZÍNÉSZ

Remélem, hogy mi azt a modort már meglehetősen
levetkeztük.

HAMLET

Vessétek le egészen! No meg, aki köztetek a bohócot
játssza, ne mondjon többet, mint írva van neki;
mert vannak azok közt is, kik magok nevetnek,
hogy egy csapat bárgyú néző utánok nevessen; ha
szinte a darabnak éppen valamely fontos mozzanata
forog is fent. Ez gyalázatosság, és igen nyomorú
becsvágyra mutat a bohóc részéről, ki e fogással él.
Menjetek, készüljetek.

Színészek el.
Polonius, Rosencrantz és Guildenstern jőnek.

Nos, uraim? eljön a király megnézni a darabot?

POLONIUS

El, a királyné is, mindjárt pedig.

HAMLET

Mondd a színészeknek, siessenek.

Polonius el.

S önök, mindketten, úgye szívesek
Lesznek segítni a siettetésben?

KETTEN

Megyünk, fönséges úr.

Rosencrantz és Guildenstern el.

HAMLET

Hol vagy, Horatio?

Horatio jő.

HORATIO

Itt, kedves úr,

Szolgálatára.

HAMLET

Halld, Horatio:

Te éppen olyan férfi vagy, minővel
Szerettem, hogy közöm volt valaha.

HORATIO

Ó, kedves úr -

HAMLET

Nem hízelgek, ne hidd;

Mi boldogúlást várhatnék tetőled,
Kinek mid sincs, jó kedveden kivűl,
Mely táplál és ruház? Mért hízelegni
Egy ily szegénynek? - Nem; a cukrozott nyelv
Ám nyalja a sületlen fényüzést,
Görbessze hajlós térde kapcsait,
Hol a farkcsóválás hasznot terem.
Hallgass ide.
Mióta választásim asszonya
Én drága lelkem, s emberek között
Különbséget bir tenni: tégedet
Pecsételt el magának; mert te, bár
Szenvedve mindent, úgy től, mint aki
Semmit se szenved; férfi vagy, ki a
Sors öklözését vagy jutalmait,
Egyképp fogadtad; s áldott az, kinek
Vérével úgy vegyült itélete,
Hogy nem merő síp a sors ujja közt,
Oly hangot adni, milyent billeget.
Férfit nekem, ki szenvedélye rabja
Nem lett soha! s én szívem közepén,
Szivem szivében hordom azt, miképp
Most tégedet. De már kissé sok is. -
Ma színjáték lesz a király előtt,
S egy jelenet közel jár ahhoz, amint
Atyám halálát elmondtam neked;
Kérlek, ha majd ez a rész fölkerül,
Csak mintha enlelkem tolmácsa volnál,
Lesd a királyt jól: ha rejtett büne
Ott egy beszédre lyukból ki nem ugrik:
A kárhozatnak lelke volt, amit
Láttunk együtt, s képzelmem oly sötét,
Mint Vulcán pőrölye. Jól megfigyeld;
Mert én arcába kapcsolom szemem;
S majd összevessük a látszat felől
Kettőnk itéletét.

HORATIO

Jó lesz, uram;

Ha meglop engem a játék alatt,
S rá nem sütöm: fizetem a lopást.

HAMLET

Már jőnek: bárgyunak kell látszanom.

Foglalj helyet.

Dán induló. Harsonák.
Király, Királyné, Polonius, Ophelia,
Rosencrantz, Guildenstern és mások jőnek.

KIRÁLY

Hogy van Hamlet öcsénk?

HAMLET

Felségesen, mákugyse! a kaméleon kosztján:
levegőt eszem, ígéret töltelékkel. Kappant
se hizlalnak így.

KIRÁLY

Semmi közöm e felelettel, Hamlet; ez nem az
én mondásom.

HAMLET

Nem ám, de az enyém se már. - Uram, ön játszott
egyszer az egyetemen, mondja?

POLONIUS

Igen, bizony, fönség; s jó színésznek tartottak.

HAMLET

S mi volt a szerepe?

POLONIUS

Julius Caesar; megöltek a Capitoliumon; Brutus ölt meg.

HAMLET

Na ugyan brutális szerep volt tőle: megölni egy
ily capitális borjút. - Készen a játszók?

ROSENCRANTZ

Igenis, fönséges úr; engedelmét várják.

KIRÁLYNÉ

Jer ide, édes Hamlet; ülj mellém.

HAMLET

Nem, kedves anyám, itt vonzóbb érc van.

POLONIUS

Ahá! tetszik látni?

HAMLET

Kisasszony, ölébe fekhetem?

Ophelia lábaihoz dőlve.

OPHELIA

Nem, uram.

HAMLET

Azaz, ölébe hajthatom a fejem?

OPHELIA

Igen, uram.

HAMLET

Azt gondolja, pórias értelemben vettem?

OPHELIA

Semmit se gondolok, uram.

HAMLET

Mily szép gondolat, egy szép leány lába közt fekünni!

OPHELIA

Tessék?

HAMLET

Semmit se mondtam.

OPHELIA

Jókedve van, fönséges úr.

HAMLET

Kinek? Nekem?

OPHELIA

Igenis.

HAMLET

Ó, boldog Isten! hisz én vagyok a világ első bohóca.
Ki tehet arról, ha jó kedve van; hisz látja, mily
vidor az anyám is, pedig az apám most halt meg,
csak két órája.

OPHELIA

Dehogy: kétszer két hónapja is van már, fönség.

HAMLET

Oly régen? Gyászolja hát az ördög! Én coboly köntöst
csináltatok. Uramfia, két hónapja s még el sincs
felejtve! Úgy hát megérjük, hogy valamely nagy
embert fél évvel is túlél az emlékezete; csakhogy,
Mária ugyse! templomot építsen ám, különben eszébe
sem jut senkinek; úgy jár, mint a fa ló, melynek
sírverse így hangzik: »Mer’ ó! mer’ ó! már a fa
ló el van feledve.«

Hoboják. A némajáték föllép.
Jő egy Király és egy Királyné, igen nyájaskodva.
A Királyné megöleli férjét, letérdel és fogadkozik.
A Király fölemeli, vállára hajtja fejét; aztán egy
virágpamlagra fekszik. A Királyné látva, hogy
elszunnyadt, távozik. Most jő egy cinkos, koronáját
leveszi, megcsókolja, s mérget töltve a király fülébe,
elmegy. A Királyné visszatér, s halva látván férjét,
szenvedélyes mozdulatokba tör ki. A mérgező, két vagy
három néma személlyel, ismét megjelenik, s bánkódni
látszik a Királynéval. A holttestet elviszik. A
mérgező ajándékkal udvarol a Királynénak; az eleinte
útálatot, nem-akarást fejez ki; de végre elfogadja
szerelmét.

OPHELIA

Mit jelent ez, fönséges úr?

HAMLET

E biz alattomos hókuszpókusz: gonoszt jelent.

OPHELIA

Talán a darab velejét mutatja a némajáték?

HAMLET

Mindjárt megtudjuk eme fickóktól: mert a
színészben nem áll a szó; kibeszél az mindent.

OPHELIA

Elmondják, mit jelent e némajáték?

HAMLET

El ám, s minden néma játékot, amit velök játszanék;
csak ne szégyelljen velök játszani, ők bizony nem
szégyellik elmondani, mit jelent.

OPHELIA

Be hamis, be hamis. Én a darabra figyelek.

PROLÓGUS

»Magunk imé, s tragédiánk
Fölségtek elé borulánk:
Kérjük, figyeljen tűrve ránk.«

HAMLET

Prológus ez, vagy gyűrűbe vésett jelige?

OPHELIA

Rövid biz az, fönség.

HAMLET

Mint a nő szerelme.

Jön a színpadi Király és Királyné.

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLY

Már Phoebus ím harmincadszor kerűl
Neptun sós árja s a földgömb körűl;
S harminc-tizenkét hold kölcsön világa
Tizenkét harmincszor tűnt a világra;
Hogy viszonos szent frigy kapcsol velem:
Kezünket Hymen, szívünk szerelem.

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLYNÉ

Még egyszer annyi holdat és napot
Érjünk, mielőtt szerelmünk elapad.
De jaj! felséged máris oly beteg
- Ép volta eltűnt, kedve csüggeteg -
Hogy félve-féltem. De bár féltsem én,
Uram, ne hagyjon téged a remény;
Arányt tart nőben féltés, szerelem:
Vagy semmi, vagy mindkettő szertelen.
No már, szerelmem jól tudod, minő:
Félelmem azzal egy arányba’ nő,
Nagy szeretet fél, apró kételyen:
S hol a félsz nagy, nagy ott a szerelem.

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLY

Itt hagylak, édes, nem soká pedig:
Szerves erőm már lanyhán működik;
Te élj, szeretve és tisztelve, még
E szép világban; s tán egy oly derék
Férj oldalán -

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLYNÉ

Ne a többit! ne, ó;
Ily szerelem szivemnek áruló!
Másod férjemmel átkozott legyek;
Máshoz csak az mén, ki megölt egyet.

HAMLET

Félre.

Üröm, üröm.

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLYNÉ

A második nász indító oka
Szennyes haszonvágy, szerelem soha;
Másodszor öltem meg holt férjemet,
Ha második férj csókol engemet.

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLY

Most, elhiszem, úgy érzesz, mint beszélsz;
De fogadásunk gyakran füstbe vész.
Föltételünk emlékezésnek rabja:
Vérmes szülött, de már számlálva napja;
Míg éretlen gyümölcs, fáján tapad;
Ha megpuhúl: rázatlan leszakad.
De kell; szükség felednünk e rovást,
Az ily magunkra felrótt tartozást:
Mert amit így fogad a szenvedély,
A szenvedéllyel oda lesz a cél.
Erős bú, vagy öröm, feltétele
Foganatát magával rontja le:
Mert hol öröm s bú van legfőbb fokon,
Az sír, ez örvend minden kis okon.
Nem örök e világ; az sem csoda,
Ha sorsunkkal a szeretet oda:
Mert hogy melyik vezérli, vitapont:
Szerelem-é a sorsot, vagy viszont?
Nagy férfi buktán, lásd, kegyence fut;
Szegény kapós lesz, amint polcra jut:
Igy, a szeretet sorsunk’ követi;
Ki nem szorul barátra, lesz neki;
S ki álbarátot szükségben kisért,
Ellent csinálni biztos útra tért. -
De, visszatérve honnan indulék:
Sors, akarat oly ellensarki vég,
Hogy terveink legtöbbször füstbe mennek;
Miénk a szándok, nem sükere ennek.
Te sem mégy máshoz, most úgy gondolod:
De elhal eszméd, ha férjed halott.

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLYNÉ

Ne adjon tápot a föld, fényt az ég!
Élvét, nyugalmát éj s nap vonja még!
Kétségre váljon remény, bízalom!
Börtön magánya légyen vígaszom!
Dúljon gyönyör-sápasztó baleset,
Ha mire vágytam, minden kedveset!
Szenvedjek itt s ott öröklétü kínt:
Ha, egyszer özvegy, nő leszek megint!

HAMLET

Ha most ezt megszegné!

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLY

Nagy eskü ez. De lelkem oly alélt:
Menj, hadd csalom meg ezt a hosszu délt
Álommal, édes.

Elalszik.

SZÍNÉSZ KIRÁLYNÉ

Ringasson az álom;
Ármány soha kettőnk közé ne szálljon.

El.

HAMLET

Asszonyom, hogy tetszik a darab?

KIRÁLYNÉ

A hölgy mintha nagyon is fogadkoznék.

HAMLET

Ó, de szavát tartja ám!

KIRÁLY

Hallottad a meséjét? Nincs benne valami bántó?

HAMLET

Nincs, nincs; hiszen csak tréfálnak, tréfából
mérgeződnek; semmi bántó a világon.

KIRÁLY

Hogy is hívják a darabot?

HAMLET

Az egérfogó. Hogy miért úgy? Képletesen. A darab
egy Viennában történt gyilkosságot ábrázol; Gonzago
neve a fejedelemnek; nője Baptista. Mindjárt meglátják.
Gonosz egy darab, az igaz; de hát aztán? Felséged
lelkiösmerete tiszta, a miénk is; minket hát nem
érdekel: kinek nem inge, ne vegye magára.

Lucianus jő.

Ez valami Lucianus, a király öccse.

OPHELIA

Fenséged nagyon jó kórus.

HAMLET

Igen jó tolmács tudnék lenni ön és szerelme közt,
csak már látnám a szökdelő bábokat.

OPHELIA

Csapkod, uram, csapkod.

HAMLET

Bezzeg jajgatna ám belé, míg el tudná venni az
ostorom csapóját.

OPHELIA

Mindegyre jobb - s rosszabb.

HAMLET

Arra esküsznek férjeikkel is - Kezdj belé már, gyilkos;
ne vágj oly veszett pofákat, hanem kezdd el. Hadd lám:
»A károgó holló bosszút üvölt« -

LUCIANUS

Szándok sötét, kéz kész, biztos szerem,
Idő szolgál, s egy lélek sincs jelen.
Te, szörny-itallá főtt éjféli gyom,
Melyet Hekate hármas átka nyom,
Varázserőd, ádáz tulajdonod
Ez ép élten most kell bitorlanod.

Mérgét az alvó fülébe önti.

HAMLET

Kertjében mérgezi meg, a birtokáért. Neve, mondom,
Gonzago; igaz, meglett történet, meg is van irva
választékos olasz nyelven. Mindjárt meglátják, hogyan
nyeri el a gyilkos Gonzago nője szerelmét.

OPHELIA

A király föláll.

HAMLET

Mit! megijedt, vak tűztől?

KIRÁLYNÉ

Hogy van, felséges férjem?

POLONIUS

Félbe kell hagyni a darabot.

KIRÁLY

Világot ide! Menjünk.

MIND

Világot! Világot!

Mind el, Hamleten és Horation kivül.

HAMLET

Ám sírjon a nyíl verte vad:

Ép gimnek tréfaság;

Mert ki vigyáz, ki meg szunyad:

Igy foly le a világ.

Nos, barátom (ha másképp szerencsém hátat forditana),
ez meg egy toll-erdő, meg egy pár vidékies szalagcsokor
kivágott cipőimen, nem bejuttatna engem akármely
színészcsapatba, vagy hogy?

HORATIO

Fél jutalom-játékra.

HAMLET

Egészre, ha mondom.

Mert hát, tudod, hű Dámonom,

Ez ország, bírta bár

Hajdan Jupiter: bírja most

Egy, egy füles - pityke.

HORATIO

Rímelhetett volna, fönség.

HAMLET

Ó, édes Horatióm! Most már tízezer forintot mernék
tenni a szellem szavára. Vetted észre?

HORATIO

Nagyon jól, fenséges úr.

HAMLET

Mikor a mérgezés következett -

HORATIO

Nagyon jól megjegyeztem.

HAMLET

Ha, ha! - Te, valami zenét! Fuvolákat ide, hé!
Mert hát, ha a király nem szereti
Komédiánkat - hát nem kell neki.

Rosencrantz és Guildenstern jőnek.

Zenét, hé!

GUILDENSTERN

Fönséges úr, engedjen egy szót.

HAMLET

Akár egész históriát, uram.

GUILDENSTERN

Fönséges úr, a király -

HAMLET

Nos, mi lelte?

GUILDENSTERN

Egész magánkívül lett szobájában.

HAMLET

Italtól, uram?

GUILDENSTERN

Nem, fönség, inkább az epétől.

HAMLET

Ön bölcsessége dúsabbnak mutatkoznék, ha ezt az
orvosának jelentené: mert ha én adnék tisztítót
neki, az még inkább epesárba ejtené.

GUILDENSTERN

Édes jó uram, ejtse valahogy rendesebben szavait,
ne tegyen oly vad szökelléseket tárgyamtól.

HAMLET

Szelíd vagyok, uram; - beszéljen.

GUILDENSTERN

Anyja, a királyné, a legnagyobb lelki aggodalomban
küldött fenségedhez.

HAMLET

Örvendek, hogy szerencsém van.

GUILDENSTERN

Nem úgy, fenséges úr; ez az udvariasság nincs helyén.
Ha fönséged méltóztatik ép feleletet adni, úgy végzem
anyja parancsát; ha nem, úgy fönséged bocsánata s az
én visszatértem leend vége küldetésemnek.

HAMLET

Uram, azt nem tehetem.

GUILDENSTERN

Mit, fönség?

HAMLET

Hogy önnek ép feleletet adjak. Elmém beteg; de oly
válasszal, aminő telik tőlem, parancsoljon ön vagy
inkább, mint mondá, az anyám. Erről hát ne többet,
hanem a tárgyra. Az anyám, mondá ön -

ROSENCRANTZ

Igen, ezt izeni. Fönséged magaviselete őfelségét
megdöbbenté s bámulatba ejté.

HAMLET

Ó, csodálatos fiú, ki egy anyát így megdöbbenthet!
De semmi következmény sincs anyám bámulatának
sarkában, ugye? Tudassa.

ROSENCRANTZ

Mielőtt fenséged lefekünnék; beszélni kíván vele
magánszobájában.

HAMLET

Engedelmeskedni fogunk, még ha tízszer anyánk volna is.
Van még valami ügyök velem?

ROSENCRANTZ

Fönséges úr, engem egykor szeretett.

HAMLET

Most is; esküszöm e csenőkre és lopókra!

ROSENCRANTZ

Édes jó uram, mi hát oka e levertségnek? Önkényt zárja
be saját szabadsága kapuját, ha búja közlését megtagadja
barátjától.

HAMLET

Előmozdítás kellene, uram.

ROSENCRANTZ

Hogy lehet az, mikor maga a király szavát adta, hogy
örökössé teszi Dániában?

HAMLET

Jaj uram, de »míg a fű megnő« - a közmondás egy kissé
kopott.

Fuvolát hoznak.

Ó, a fuvola! Hadd lám - csak hogy szabaduljak tőletek.
- Mért akartok ti kerűlgetve szelet fogni tőlem,
mintha hálóba akarnátok terelni?

GUILDENSTERN

Ó, kegyelmes úr; ha kötelességem túlbuzgó, szeretetem
is udvariatlan.

HAMLET

Ezt nem értem világosan. Nem játszanál egyet e sípon?

GUILDENSTERN

Nem tudok, fenség.

HAMLET

De ha kérlek.

GUILDENSTERN

Higgye el, nem tudok.

HAMLET

Esedezem.

GUILDENSTERN

Egy billentést sem tudok, fenséges úr.

HAMLET

Hisz az oly könnyű, mint hazudni: kormányozd e
szellentyűket ujjaiddal s hüvelykeddel; száddal
lehelj belé; s a legremekebb zenét fogja beszélni.
Látod, ezek a billentyűi.

GUILDENSTERN

De én éppen azokat nem bírom harmónia zengedezésre
vezényelni; nincs hozzá ügyességem.

HAMLET

No lám, mily becstelen eszközzé akartok ti tenni engem.
Játszani akarnátok rajtam; ismerni billentyűimet;
kitépni rejtelmem szívét, hanglétrám minden hangját
kitapogatni a legalsótól a legfelsőig; pedig e kis
eszközben zene rejlik, felséges szózat, mégsem bírjátok
szavát venni. A keservét! azt hiszitek, könnyebb
énrajtam játszani, mint egy rossz sípon? Gondoljatok
bármi hangszernek: rám tehetitek a nyerget, de nem
bírtok játszani rajtam.

Polonius jő.

Isten áldja, uraim.

POLONIUS

Uram, a királyné beszélni akar fönségeddel, mindjárt
pedig.

HAMLET

Látja-e azt a felhőt? Majdnem olyan, mint egy teve.

POLONIUS

Isten engem, valóságos teve alakú.

HAMLET

Nekem úgy tetszik, menyéthez hasonlít.

POLONIUS

A háta olyan, mint a menyétnek.

HAMLET

Vagy inkább cethalforma?

POLONIUS

Nagyon hasonló a cethalhoz.

HAMLET

No hát, mondja anyámnak, megyek tüstint. - Csak addig
tesztek engem bolonddá, ameddig kedvem tartja. -
Megyek tüstint.

POLONIUS

Mondom.

El.

HAMLET

»Tüstint« szót könnyű mondani. - Hagyjatok egyedül, barátim.

Rosencrantz, Guildenstern és Horatio el.

Most van az éjnek rémjáró szaka,
Minden sír ásít, s maga a pokol
Dögvészt lehell ki. Most hő vért meginnám,
S oly szörnyű tettet bírnék elkövetni,
Hogy a napfény reszketve nézne rá.
De csitt! anyámhoz. - Ó, szív! el ne nyomd
Természeted, s ne hadd, hogy e kebelbe
A Néro lelke szálljon valaha:
Legyek kegyetlen, ne vértagadó.
Dobjon szavam tőrt, ne rántson kezem.
Nyelv s szándok ebben kétszinű legyen:
Hogy, bármi zokon ejtsem a beszédet,
Tettel ne nyomjon lelkem rá pecsétet.

El.



KiadóInterpopulart Könyvkiadó
Az idézet forrásaWilliam Shakespeare: Hamlet, dán királyfi

minimap