Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Hírek

Shaw, George Bernard: Pygmalion (Pygmalion Magyar nyelven)

Shaw, George Bernard portréja
Mészöly Dezső portréja

Vissza a fordító lapjára

Pygmalion (Angol)

ACT I

 

Covent Garden at 11.15 p.m. Torrents of heavy summer rain. Cab whistles blowing frantically in all directions. Pedestrians running for shelter into the market and under the portico of St. Paul's Church, where there are already several people, among them a lady and her daughter in evening dress. They are all peering out gloomily at the rain, except one man with his back turned to the rest, who seems wholly preoccupied with a notebook in which he is writing busily. 

The church clock strikes the first quarter.

 

THE DAUGHTER [in the space between the central pillars, close to the one on her left] I'm getting chilled to the bone. What can Freddy be doing all this time? He's been gone twenty minutes.

 

THE MOTHER [on her daughter's right] Not so long. But he ought to have got us a cab by this.

 

A BYSTANDER [on the lady's right] He won't get no cab not until half-past eleven, missus, when they come back after dropping their theatre fares.

 

THE MOTHER. But we must have a cab. We can't stand here until half-past eleven. It's too bad.

 

THE BYSTANDER. Well, it ain't my fault, missus.

 

THE DAUGHTER. If Freddy had a bit of gumption, he would have got one at the theatre door.

 

THE MOTHER. What could he have done, poor boy?

 

THE DAUGHTER. Other people got cabs. Why couldn't he?

 

Freddy rushes in out of the rain from the Southampton Street side, and comes between them closing a dripping umbrella. He is a young man of twenty, in evening dress, very wet around the ankles.

 

THE DAUGHTER. Well, haven't you got a cab?

 

FREDDY. There's not one to be had for love or money.

 

THE MOTHER. Oh, Freddy, there must be one. You can't have tried.

 

THE DAUGHTER. It's too tiresome. Do you expect us to go and get one ourselves?

 

FREDDY. I tell you they're all engaged. The rain was so sudden: nobody was prepared; and everybody had to take a cab. I've been to Charing Cross one way and nearly to Ludgate Circus the other; and they were all engaged.

 

THE MOTHER. Did you try Trafalgar Square?

 

FREDDY. There wasn't one at Trafalgar Square.

 

THE DAUGHTER. Did you try?

 

FREDDY. I tried as far as Charing Cross Station. Did you expect me to walk to Hammersmith?

 

THE DAUGHTER. You haven't tried at all.

 

THE MOTHER. You really are very helpless, Freddy. Go again; and don't come back until you have found a cab.

 

FREDDY. I shall simply get soaked for nothing.

 

THE DAUGHTER. And what about us? Are we to stay here all night in this draught, with next to nothing on. You selfish pig—

 

FREDDY. Oh, very well: I'll go, I'll go. [He opens his umbrella and dashes off Strandwards, but comes into collision with a flower girl, who is hurrying in for shelter, knocking her basket out of her hands. A blinding flash of lightning, followed instantly by a rattling peal of thunder, orchestrates the incident]

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Nah then, Freddy: look wh' y' gowin, deah.

 

FREDDY. Sorry [he rushes off].

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [picking up her scattered flowers and replacing them in the basket] There's menners f' yer! Te-oo banches o voylets trod into the mad. [She sits down on the plinth of the column, sorting her flowers, on the lady's right. She is not at all an attractive person. She is perhaps eighteen, perhaps twenty, hardly older. She wears a little sailor hat of black straw that has long been exposed to the dust and soot of London and has seldom if ever been brushed. Her hair needs washing rather badly: its mousy color can hardly be natural. She wears a shoddy black coat that reaches nearly to her knees and is shaped to her waist. She has a brown skirt with a coarse apron. Her boots are much the worse for wear. She is no doubt as clean as she can afford to be; but compared to the ladies she is very dirty. Her features are no worse than theirs; but their condition leaves something to be desired; and she needs the services of a dentist].

 

THE MOTHER. How do you know that my son's name is Freddy, pray?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Ow, eez ye-ooa san, is e? Wal, fewd dan y' de-ooty bawmz a mather should, eed now bettern to spawl a pore gel's flahrzn than ran awy atbaht pyin. Will ye-oo py me f'them? [Here, with apologies, this desperate attempt to represent her dialect without a phonetic alphabet must be abandoned as unintelligible outside London.]

 

THE DAUGHTER. Do nothing of the sort, mother. The idea!

 

THE MOTHER. Please allow me, Clara. Have you any pennies?

 

THE DAUGHTER. No. I've nothing smaller than sixpence.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [hopefully] I can give you change for a tanner, kind lady.

 

THE MOTHER [to Clara] Give it to me. [Clara parts reluctantly]. Now [to the girl] This is for your flowers.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Thank you kindly, lady.

 

THE DAUGHTER. Make her give you the change. These things are only a penny a bunch.

 

THE MOTHER. Do hold your tongue, Clara. [To the girl]. You can keep the change.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Oh, thank you, lady.

 

THE MOTHER. Now tell me how you know that young gentleman's name.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. I didn't.

 

THE MOTHER. I heard you call him by it. Don't try to deceive me.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [protesting] Who's trying to deceive you? I called him Freddy or Charlie same as you might yourself if you was talking to a stranger and wished to be pleasant. [She sits down beside her basket].

 

THE DAUGHTER. Sixpence thrown away! Really, mamma, you might have spared Freddy that. [She retreats in disgust behind the pillar].

 

An elderly gentleman of the amiable military type rushes into shelter, and closes a dripping umbrella. He is in the same plight as Freddy, very wet about the ankles. He is in evening dress, with a light overcoat. He takes the place left vacant by the daughter's retirement.

 

THE GENTLEMAN. Phew!

 

THE MOTHER [to the gentleman] Oh, sir, is there any sign of its stopping?

 

THE GENTLEMAN. I'm afraid not. It started worse than ever about two minutes ago. [He goes to the plinth beside the flower girl; puts up his foot on it; and stoops to turn down his trouser ends].

 

THE MOTHER. Oh, dear! [She retires sadly and joins her daughter].

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [taking advantage of the military gentleman's proximity to establish friendly relations with him]. If it's worse it's a sign it's nearly over. So cheer up, Captain; and buy a flower off a poor girl.

 

THE GENTLEMAN. I'm sorry, I haven't any change.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. I can give you change, Captain,

 

THE GENTLEMEN. For a sovereign? I've nothing less.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Garn! Oh do buy a flower off me, Captain. I can change half-a-crown. Take this for tuppence.

 

THE GENTLEMAN. Now don't be troublesome: there's a good girl. [Trying his pockets] I really haven't any change—Stop: here's three hapence, if that's any use to you [he retreats to the other pillar].

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [disappointed, but thinking three halfpence better than nothing] Thank you, sir.

 

THE BYSTANDER [to the girl] You be careful: give him a flower for it. There's a bloke here behind taking down every blessed word you're saying. [All turn to the man who is taking notes].

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [springing up terrified] I ain't done nothing wrong by speaking to the gentleman. I've a right to sell flowers if I keep off the kerb. [Hysterically] I'm a respectable girl: so help me, I never spoke to him except to ask him to buy a flower off me. [General hubbub, mostly sympathetic to the flower girl, but deprecating her excessive sensibility. Cries of Don't start hollerin. Who's hurting you? Nobody's going to touch you. What's the good of fussing? Steady on. Easy, easy, etc., come from the elderly staid spectators, who pat her comfortingly. Less patient ones bid her shut her head, or ask her roughly what is wrong with her. A remoter group, not knowing what the matter is, crowd in and increase the noise with question and answer: What's the row? What she do? Where is he? A tec taking her down. What! him? Yes: him over there: Took money off the gentleman, etc. The flower girl, distraught and mobbed, breaks through them to the gentleman, crying mildly] Oh, sir, don't let him charge me. You dunno what it means to me. They'll take away my character and drive me on the streets for speaking to gentlemen. They—

 

THE NOTE TAKER [coming forward on her right, the rest crowding after him] There, there, there, there! Who's hurting you, you silly girl? What do you take me for?

 

THE BYSTANDER. It's all right: he's a gentleman: look at his boots. [Explaining to the note taker] She thought you was a copper's nark, sir.

 

THE NOTE TAKER [with quick interest] What's a copper's nark?

 

THE BYSTANDER [inept at definition] It's a—well, it's a copper's nark, as you might say. What else would you call it? A sort of informer.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [still hysterical] I take my Bible oath I never said a word—

 

THE NOTE TAKER [overbearing but good-humored] Oh, shut up, shut up. Do I look like a policeman?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [far from reassured] Then what did you take down my words for? How do I know whether you took me down right? You just show me what you've wrote about me. [The note taker opens his book and holds it steadily under her nose, though the pressure of the mob trying to read it over his shoulders would upset a weaker man]. What's that? That ain't proper writing. I can't read that.

 

THE NOTE TAKER. I can. [Reads, reproducing her pronunciation exactly] "Cheer ap, Keptin; n' haw ya flahr orf a pore gel."

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [much distressed] It's because I called him Captain. I meant no harm. [To the gentleman] Oh, sir, don't let him lay a charge agen me for a word like that. You—

 

THE GENTLEMAN. Charge! I make no charge. [To the note taker] Really, sir, if you are a detective, you need not begin protecting me against molestation by young women until I ask you. Anybody could see that the girl meant no harm.

 

THE BYSTANDERS GENERALLY [demonstrating against police espionage] Course they could. What business is it of yours? You mind your own affairs. He wants promotion, he does. Taking down people's words! Girl never said a word to him. What harm if she did? Nice thing a girl can't shelter from the rain without being insulted, etc., etc., etc. [She is conducted by the more sympathetic demonstrators back to her plinth, where she resumes her seat and struggles with her emotion].

 

THE BYSTANDER. He ain't a tec. He's a blooming busybody: that's what he is. I tell you, look at his boots.

 

THE NOTE TAKER [turning on him genially] And how are all your people down at Selsey?

 

THE BYSTANDER [suspiciously] Who told you my people come from Selsey?

 

THE NOTE TAKER. Never you mind. They did. [To the girl] How do you come to be up so far east? You were born in Lisson Grove.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [appalled] Oh, what harm is there in my leaving Lisson Grove? It wasn't fit for a pig to live in; and I had to pay four-and-six a week. [In tears] Oh, boo—hoo—oo—

 

THE NOTE TAKER. Live where you like; but stop that noise.

 

THE GENTLEMAN [to the girl] Come, come! he can't touch you: you have a right to live where you please.

 

A SARCASTIC BYSTANDER [thrusting himself between the note taker and the gentleman] Park Lane, for instance. I'd like to go into the Housing Question with you, I would.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [subsiding into a brooding melancholy over her basket, and talking very low-spiritedly to herself] I'm a good girl, I am.

 

THE SARCASTIC BYSTANDER [not attending to her] Do you know where I come from?

 

THE NOTE TAKER [promptly] Hoxton.

 

Titterings. Popular interest in the note taker's performance increases.

 

THE SARCASTIC ONE [amazed] Well, who said I didn't? Bly me! You know everything, you do.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [still nursing her sense of injury] Ain't no call to meddle with me, he ain't.

 

THE BYSTANDER [to her] Of course he ain't. Don't you stand it from him. [To the note taker] See here: what call have you to know about people what never offered to meddle with you? Where's your warrant?

 

SEVERAL BYSTANDERS [encouraged by this seeming point of law] Yes: where's your warrant?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Let him say what he likes. I don't want to have no truck with him.

 

THE BYSTANDER. You take us for dirt under your feet, don't you? Catch you taking liberties with a gentleman!

 

THE SARCASTIC BYSTANDER. Yes: tell HIM where he come from if you want to go fortune-telling.

 

THE NOTE TAKER. Cheltenham, Harrow, Cambridge, and India.

 

THE GENTLEMAN. Quite right. [Great laughter. Reaction in the note taker's favor. Exclamations of He knows all about it. Told him proper. Hear him tell the toff where he come from? etc.]. May I ask, sir, do you do this for your living at a music hall?

 

THE NOTE TAKER. I've thought of that. Perhaps I shall some day.

 

The rain has stopped; and the persons on the outside of the crowd begin to drop off.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [resenting the reaction] He's no gentleman, he ain't, to interfere with a poor girl.

 

THE DAUGHTER [out of patience, pushing her way rudely to the front and displacing the gentleman, who politely retires to the other side of the pillar] What on earth is Freddy doing? I shall get pneumonia if I stay in this draught any longer.

 

THE NOTE TAKER [to himself, hastily making a note of her pronunciation of "monia"] Earlscourt.

 

THE DAUGHTER [violently] Will you please keep your impertinent remarks to yourself?

 

THE NOTE TAKER. Did I say that out loud? I didn't mean to. I beg your pardon. Your mother's Epsom, unmistakeably.

 

THE MOTHER [advancing between her daughter and the note taker] How very curious! I was brought up in Largelady Park, near Epsom.

 

THE NOTE TAKER [uproariously amused] Ha! ha! What a devil of a name! Excuse me. [To the daughter] You want a cab, do you?

 

THE DAUGHTER. Don't dare speak to me.

 

THE MOTHER. Oh, please, please Clara. [Her daughter repudiates her with an angry shrug and retires haughtily.] We should be so grateful to you, sir, if you found us a cab. [The note taker produces a whistle]. Oh, thank you. [She joins her daughter]. The note taker blows a piercing blast.

 

THE SARCASTIC BYSTANDER. There! I knowed he was a plain-clothes copper.

 

THE BYSTANDER. That ain't a police whistle: that's a sporting whistle.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [still preoccupied with her wounded feelings] He's no right to take away my character. My character is the same to me as any lady's.

 

THE NOTE TAKER. I don't know whether you've noticed it; but the rain stopped about two minutes ago.

 

THE BYSTANDER. So it has. Why didn't you say so before? and us losing our time listening to your silliness. [He walks off towards the Strand].

 

THE SARCASTIC BYSTANDER. I can tell where you come from. You come from Anwell. Go back there.

 

THE NOTE TAKER [helpfully] Hanwell.

 

THE SARCASTIC BYSTANDER [affecting great distinction of speech] Thenk you, teacher. Haw haw! So long [he touches his hat with mock respect and strolls off].

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Frightening people like that! How would he like it himself.

 

THE MOTHER. It's quite fine now, Clara. We can walk to a motor bus. Come. [She gathers her skirts above her ankles and hurries off towards the Strand].

 

THE DAUGHTER. But the cab—[her mother is out of hearing]. Oh, how tiresome! [She follows angrily].

 

All the rest have gone except the note taker, the gentleman, and the flower girl, who sits arranging her basket, and still pitying herself in murmurs.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Poor girl! Hard enough for her to live without being worrited and chivied.

 

THE GENTLEMAN [returning to his former place on the note taker's left] How do you do it, if I may ask?

 

THE NOTE TAKER. Simply phonetics. The science of speech. That's my profession; also my hobby. Happy is the man who can make a living by his hobby! You can spot an Irishman or a Yorkshireman by his brogue. I can place any man within six miles. I can place him within two miles in London. Sometimes within two streets.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Ought to be ashamed of himself, unmanly coward!

 

THE GENTLEMAN. But is there a living in that?

 

THE NOTE TAKER. Oh yes. Quite a fat one. This is an age of upstarts. Men begin in Kentish Town with 80 pounds a year, and end in Park Lane with a hundred thousand. They want to drop Kentish Town; but they give themselves away every time they open their mouths. Now I can teach them—

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Let him mind his own business and leave a poor girl—

 

THE NOTE TAKER [explosively] Woman: cease this detestable boohooing instantly; or else seek the shelter of some other place of worship.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [with feeble defiance] I've a right to be here if I like, same as you.

 

THE NOTE TAKER. A woman who utters such depressing and disgusting sounds has no right to be anywhere—no right to live. Remember that you are a human being with a soul and the divine gift of articulate speech: that your native language is the language of Shakespear and Milton and The Bible; and don't sit there crooning like a bilious pigeon.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [quite overwhelmed, and looking up at him in mingled wonder and deprecation without daring to raise her head] Ah—ah—ah—ow—ow—oo!

 

THE NOTE TAKER [whipping out his book] Heavens! what a sound! [He writes; then holds out the book and reads, reproducing her vowels exactly] Ah—ah—ah—ow—ow—ow—oo!

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [tickled by the performance, and laughing in spite of herself] Garn!

 

THE NOTE TAKER. You see this creature with her kerbstone English: the English that will keep her in the gutter to the end of her days. Well, sir, in three months I could pass that girl off as a duchess at an ambassador's garden party. I could even get her a place as lady's maid or shop assistant, which requires better English. That's the sort of thing I do for commercial millionaires. And on the profits of it I do genuine scientific work in phonetics, and a little as a poet on Miltonic lines.

 

THE GENTLEMAN. I am myself a student of Indian dialects; and—

 

THE NOTE TAKER [eagerly] Are you? Do you know Colonel Pickering, the author of Spoken Sanscrit?

 

THE GENTLEMAN. I am Colonel Pickering. Who are you?

 

THE NOTE TAKER. Henry Higgins, author of Higgins's Universal Alphabet.

 

PICKERING [with enthusiasm] I came from India to meet you.

 

HIGGINS. I was going to India to meet you.

 

PICKERING. Where do you live?

 

HIGGINS. 27A Wimpole Street. Come and see me tomorrow.

 

PICKERING. I'm at the Carlton. Come with me now and let's have a jaw over some supper.

 

HIGGINS. Right you are.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [to Pickering, as he passes her] Buy a flower, kind gentleman. I'm short for my lodging.

 

PICKERING. I really haven't any change. I'm sorry [he goes away].

 

HIGGINS [shocked at girl's mendacity] Liar. You said you could change half-a-crown.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [rising in desperation] You ought to be stuffed with nails, you ought. [Flinging the basket at his feet] Take the whole blooming basket for sixpence.

 

The church clock strikes the second quarter.

 

HIGGINS [hearing in it the voice of God, rebuking him for his Pharisaic want of charity to the poor girl] A reminder. [He raises his hat solemnly; then throws a handful of money into the basket and follows Pickering].

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [picking up a half-crown] Ah—ow—ooh! [Picking up a couple of florins] Aaah—ow—ooh! [Picking up several coins] Aaaaaah—ow—ooh! [Picking up a half-sovereign] Aasaaaaaaaaah—ow—ooh!!!

 

FREDDY [springing out of a taxicab] Got one at last. Hallo! [To the girl] Where are the two ladies that were here?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. They walked to the bus when the rain stopped.

 

FREDDY. And left me with a cab on my hands. Damnation!

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [with grandeur] Never you mind, young man. I'm going home in a taxi. [She sails off to the cab. The driver puts his hand behind him and holds the door firmly shut against her. Quite understanding his mistrust, she shows him her handful of money]. Eightpence ain't no object to me, Charlie. [He grins and opens the door]. Angel Court, Drury Lane, round the corner of Micklejohn's oil shop. Let's see how fast you can make her hop it. [She gets in and pulls the door to with a slam as the taxicab starts].

 

FREDDY. Well, I'm dashed!

 

 

 

 

ACT II

 

Next day at 11 a.m. Higgins's laboratory in Wimpole Street. It is a room on the first floor, looking on the street, and was meant for the drawing-room. The double doors are in the middle of the back hall; and persons entering find in the corner to their right two tall file cabinets at right angles to one another against the walls. In this corner stands a flat writing-table, on which are a phonograph, a laryngoscope, a row of tiny organ pipes with a bellows, a set of lamp chimneys for singing flames with burners attached to a gas plug in the wall by an indiarubber tube, several tuning-forks of different sizes, a life-size image of half a human head, showing in section the vocal organs, and a box containing a supply of wax cylinders for the phonograph.

 

Further down the room, on the same side, is a fireplace, with a comfortable leather-covered easy-chair at the side of the hearth nearest the door, and a coal-scuttle. There is a clock on the mantelpiece. Between the fireplace and the phonograph table is a stand for newspapers.

 

On the other side of the central door, to the left of the visitor, is a cabinet of shallow drawers. On it is a telephone and the telephone directory. The corner beyond, and most of the side wall, is occupied by a grand piano, with the keyboard at the end furthest from the door, and a bench for the player extending the full length of the keyboard. On the piano is a dessert dish heaped with fruit and sweets, mostly chocolates.

 

The middle of the room is clear. Besides the easy chair, the piano bench, and two chairs at the phonograph table, there is one stray chair. It stands near the fireplace. On the walls, engravings; mostly Piranesis and mezzotint portraits. No paintings.

 

Pickering is seated at the table, putting down some cards and a tuning-fork which he has been using. Higgins is standing up near him, closing two or three file drawers which are hanging out. He appears in the morning light as a robust, vital, appetizing sort of man of forty or thereabouts, dressed in a professional-looking black frock-coat with a white linen collar and black silk tie. He is of the energetic, scientific type, heartily, even violently interested in everything that can be studied as a scientific subject, and careless about himself and other people, including their feelings. He is, in fact, but for his years and size, rather like a very impetuous baby "taking notice" eagerly and loudly, and requiring almost as much watching to keep him out of unintended mischief. His manner varies from genial bullying when he is in a good humor to stormy petulance when anything goes wrong; but he is so entirely frank and void of malice that he remains likeable even in his least reasonable moments.

 

HIGGINS [as he shuts the last drawer] Well, I think that's the whole show.

 

PICKERING. It's really amazing. I haven't taken half of it in, you know.

 

HIGGINS. Would you like to go over any of it again?

 

PICKERING [rising and coming to the fireplace, where he plants himself with his back to the fire] No, thank you; not now. I'm quite done up for this morning.

 

HIGGINS [following him, and standing beside him on his left] Tired of listening to sounds?

 

PICKERING. Yes. It's a fearful strain. I rather fancied myself because I can pronounce twenty-four distinct vowel sounds; but your hundred and thirty beat me. I can't hear a bit of difference between most of them.

 

HIGGINS [chuckling, and going over to the piano to eat sweets] Oh, that comes with practice. You hear no difference at first; but you keep on listening, and presently you find they're all as different as A from B. [Mrs. Pearce looks in: she is Higgins's housekeeper] What's the matter?

 

MRS. PEARCE [hesitating, evidently perplexed] A young woman wants to see you, sir.

 

HIGGINS. A young woman! What does she want?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Well, sir, she says you'll be glad to see her when you know what she's come about. She's quite a common girl, sir. Very common indeed. I should have sent her away, only I thought perhaps you wanted her to talk into your machines. I hope I've not done wrong; but really you see such queer people sometimes—you'll excuse me, I'm sure, sir—

 

HIGGINS. Oh, that's all right, Mrs. Pearce. Has she an interesting accent?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Oh, something dreadful, sir, really. I don't know how you can take an interest in it.

 

HIGGINS [to Pickering] Let's have her up. Show her up, Mrs. Pearce [he rushes across to his working table and picks out a cylinder to use on the phonograph].

 

MRS. PEARCE [only half resigned to it] Very well, sir. It's for you to say. [She goes downstairs].

 

HIGGINS. This is rather a bit of luck. I'll show you how I make records. We'll set her talking; and I'll take it down first in Bell's visible Speech; then in broad Romic; and then we'll get her on the phonograph so that you can turn her on as often as you like with the written transcript before you.

 

MRS. PEARCE [returning] This is the young woman, sir.

 

The flower girl enters in state. She has a hat with three ostrich feathers, orange, sky-blue, and red. She has a nearly clean apron, and the shoddy coat has been tidied a little. The pathos of this deplorable figure, with its innocent vanity and consequential air, touches Pickering, who has already straightened himself in the presence of Mrs. Pearce. But as to Higgins, the only distinction he makes between men and women is that when he is neither bullying nor exclaiming to the heavens against some featherweight cross, he coaxes women as a child coaxes its nurse when it wants to get anything out of her.

 

HIGGINS [brusquely, recognizing her with unconcealed disappointment, and at once, baby-like, making an intolerable grievance of it] Why, this is the girl I jotted down last night. She's no use: I've got all the records I want of the Lisson Grove lingo; and I'm not going to waste another cylinder on it. [To the girl] Be off with you: I don't want you.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Don't you be so saucy. You ain't heard what I come for yet. [To Mrs. Pearce, who is waiting at the door for further instruction] Did you tell him I come in a taxi?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Nonsense, girl! what do you think a gentleman like Mr. Higgins cares what you came in?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Oh, we are proud! He ain't above giving lessons, not him: I heard him say so. Well, I ain't come here to ask for any compliment; and if my money's not good enough I can go elsewhere.

 

HIGGINS. Good enough for what?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Good enough for ye—oo. Now you know, don't you? I'm come to have lessons, I am. And to pay for em too: make no mistake.

 

HIGGINS [stupent] WELL!!! [Recovering his breath with a gasp] What do you expect me to say to you?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Well, if you was a gentleman, you might ask me to sit down, I think. Don't I tell you I'm bringing you business?

 

HIGGINS. Pickering: shall we ask this baggage to sit down or shall we throw her out of the window?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [running away in terror to the piano, where she turns at bay] Ah—ah—ah—ow—ow—ow—oo! [Wounded and whimpering] I won't be called a baggage when I've offered to pay like any lady.

 

Motionless, the two men stare at her from the other side of the room, amazed.

 

PICKERING [gently] What is it you want, my girl?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. I want to be a lady in a flower shop stead of selling at the corner of Tottenham Court Road. But they won't take me unless I can talk more genteel. He said he could teach me. Well, here I am ready to pay him—not asking any favor—and he treats me as if I was dirt.

 

MRS. PEARCE. How can you be such a foolish ignorant girl as to think you could afford to pay Mr. Higgins?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Why shouldn't I? I know what lessons cost as well as you do; and I'm ready to pay.

 

HIGGINS. How much?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL [coming back to him, triumphant] Now you're talking! I thought you'd come off it when you saw a chance of getting back a bit of what you chucked at me last night. [Confidentially] You'd had a drop in, hadn't you?

 

HIGGINS [peremptorily] Sit down.

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Oh, if you're going to make a compliment of it—

 

HIGGINS [thundering at her] Sit down.

 

MRS. PEARCE [severely] Sit down, girl. Do as you're told. [She places the stray chair near the hearthrug between Higgins and Pickering, and stands behind it waiting for the girl to sit down].

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Ah—ah—ah—ow—ow—oo! [She stands, half rebellious, half bewildered].

 

PICKERING [very courteous] Won't you sit down?

 

LIZA [coyly] Don't mind if I do. [She sits down. Pickering returns to the hearthrug].

 

HIGGINS. What's your name?

 

THE FLOWER GIRL. Liza Doolittle.

 

HIGGINS [declaiming gravely] Eliza, Elizabeth, Betsy and Bess, They went to the woods to get a birds nes': PICKERING. They found a nest with four eggs in it: HIGGINS. They took one apiece, and left three in it.

 

They laugh heartily at their own wit.

 

LIZA. Oh, don't be silly.

 

MRS. PEARCE. You mustn't speak to the gentleman like that.

 

LIZA. Well, why won't he speak sensible to me?

 

HIGGINS. Come back to business. How much do you propose to pay me for the lessons?

 

LIZA. Oh, I know what's right. A lady friend of mine gets French lessons for eighteenpence an hour from a real French gentleman. Well, you wouldn't have the face to ask me the same for teaching me my own language as you would for French; so I won't give more than a shilling. Take it or leave it.

 

HIGGINS [walking up and down the room, rattling his keys and his cash in his pockets] You know, Pickering, if you consider a shilling, not as a simple shilling, but as a percentage of this girl's income, it works out as fully equivalent to sixty or seventy guineas from a millionaire.

 

PICKERING. How so?

 

HIGGINS. Figure it out. A millionaire has about 150 pounds a day. She earns about half-a-crown.

 

LIZA [haughtily] Who told you I only—

 

HIGGINS [continuing] She offers me two-fifths of her day's income for a lesson. Two-fifths of a millionaire's income for a day would be somewhere about 60 pounds. It's handsome. By George, it's enormous! it's the biggest offer I ever had.

 

LIZA [rising, terrified] Sixty pounds! What are you talking about? I never offered you sixty pounds. Where would I get—

 

HIGGINS. Hold your tongue.

 

LIZA [weeping] But I ain't got sixty pounds. Oh—

 

MRS. PEARCE. Don't cry, you silly girl. Sit down. Nobody is going to touch your money.

 

HIGGINS. Somebody is going to touch you, with a broomstick, if you don't stop snivelling. Sit down.

 

LIZA [obeying slowly] Ah—ah—ah—ow—oo—o! One would think you was my father.

 

HIGGINS. If I decide to teach you, I'll be worse than two fathers to you. Here [he offers her his silk handkerchief]!

 

LIZA. What's this for?

 

HIGGINS. To wipe your eyes. To wipe any part of your face that feels moist. Remember: that's your handkerchief; and that's your sleeve. Don't mistake the one for the other if you wish to become a lady in a shop.

 

Liza, utterly bewildered, stares helplessly at him.

 

MRS. PEARCE. It's no use talking to her like that, Mr. Higgins: she doesn't understand you. Besides, you're quite wrong: she doesn't do it that way at all [she takes the handkerchief].

 

LIZA [snatching it] Here! You give me that handkerchief. He give it to me, not to you.

 

PICKERING [laughing] He did. I think it must be regarded as her property, Mrs. Pearce.

 

MRS. PEARCE [resigning herself] Serve you right, Mr. Higgins.

 

PICKERING. Higgins: I'm interested. What about the ambassador's garden party? I'll say you're the greatest teacher alive if you make that good. I'll bet you all the expenses of the experiment you can't do it. And I'll pay for the lessons.

 

LIZA. Oh, you are real good. Thank you, Captain.

 

HIGGINS [tempted, looking at her] It's almost irresistible. She's so deliciously low—so horribly dirty—

 

LIZA [protesting extremely] Ah—ah—ah—ah—ow—ow—oooo!!! I ain't dirty: I washed my face and hands afore I come, I did.

 

PICKERING. You're certainly not going to turn her head with flattery, Higgins.

 

MRS. PEARCE [uneasy] Oh, don't say that, sir: there's more ways than one of turning a girl's head; and nobody can do it better than Mr. Higgins, though he may not always mean it. I do hope, sir, you won't encourage him to do anything foolish.

 

HIGGINS [becoming excited as the idea grows on him] What is life but a series of inspired follies? The difficulty is to find them to do. Never lose a chance: it doesn't come every day. I shall make a duchess of this draggletailed guttersnipe.

 

LIZA [strongly deprecating this view of her] Ah—ah—ah—ow—ow—oo!

 

HIGGINS [carried away] Yes: in six months—in three if she has a good ear and a quick tongue—I'll take her anywhere and pass her off as anything. We'll start today: now! this moment! Take her away and clean her, Mrs. Pearce. Monkey Brand, if it won't come off any other way. Is there a good fire in the kitchen?

 

MRS. PEARCE [protesting]. Yes; but—

 

HIGGINS [storming on] Take all her clothes off and burn them. Ring up Whiteley or somebody for new ones. Wrap her up in brown paper till they come.

 

LIZA. You're no gentleman, you're not, to talk of such things. I'm a good girl, I am; and I know what the like of you are, I do.

 

HIGGINS. We want none of your Lisson Grove prudery here, young woman. You've got to learn to behave like a duchess. Take her away, Mrs. Pearce. If she gives you any trouble wallop her.

 

LIZA [springing up and running between Pickering and Mrs. Pearce for protection] No! I'll call the police, I will.

 

MRS. PEARCE. But I've no place to put her.

 

HIGGINS. Put her in the dustbin.

 

LIZA. Ah—ah—ah—ow—ow—oo!

 

PICKERING. Oh come, Higgins! be reasonable.

 

MRS. PEARCE [resolutely] You must be reasonable, Mr. Higgins: really you must. You can't walk over everybody like this.

 

Higgins, thus scolded, subsides. The hurricane is succeeded by a zephyr of amiable surprise.

 

HIGGINS [with professional exquisiteness of modulation] I walk over everybody! My dear Mrs. Pearce, my dear Pickering, I never had the slightest intention of walking over anyone. All I propose is that we should be kind to this poor girl. We must help her to prepare and fit herself for her new station in life. If I did not express myself clearly it was because I did not wish to hurt her delicacy, or yours.

 

Liza, reassured, steals back to her chair.

 

MRS. PEARCE [to Pickering] Well, did you ever hear anything like that, sir?

 

PICKERING [laughing heartily] Never, Mrs. Pearce: never.

 

HIGGINS [patiently] What's the matter?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Well, the matter is, sir, that you can't take a girl up like that as if you were picking up a pebble on the beach.

 

HIGGINS. Why not?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Why not! But you don't know anything about her. What about her parents? She may be married.

 

LIZA. Garn!

 

HIGGINS. There! As the girl very properly says, Garn! Married indeed! Don't you know that a woman of that class looks a worn out drudge of fifty a year after she's married.

 

LIZA. Who'd marry me?

 

HIGGINS [suddenly resorting to the most thrillingly beautiful low tones in his best elocutionary style] By George, Eliza, the streets will be strewn with the bodies of men shooting themselves for your sake before I've done with you.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Nonsense, sir. You mustn't talk like that to her.

 

LIZA [rising and squaring herself determinedly] I'm going away. He's off his chump, he is. I don't want no balmies teaching me.

 

HIGGINS [wounded in his tenderest point by her insensibility to his elocution] Oh, indeed! I'm mad, am I? Very well, Mrs. Pearce: you needn't order the new clothes for her. Throw her out.

 

LIZA [whimpering] Nah—ow. You got no right to touch me.

 

MRS. PEARCE. You see now what comes of being saucy. [Indicating the door] This way, please.

 

LIZA [almost in tears] I didn't want no clothes. I wouldn't have taken them [she throws away the handkerchief]. I can buy my own clothes.

 

HIGGINS [deftly retrieving the handkerchief and intercepting her on her reluctant way to the door] You're an ungrateful wicked girl. This is my return for offering to take you out of the gutter and dress you beautifully and make a lady of you.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Stop, Mr. Higgins. I won't allow it. It's you that are wicked. Go home to your parents, girl; and tell them to take better care of you.

 

LIZA. I ain't got no parents. They told me I was big enough to earn my own living and turned me out.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Where's your mother?

 

LIZA. I ain't got no mother. Her that turned me out was my sixth stepmother. But I done without them. And I'm a good girl, I am.

 

HIGGINS. Very well, then, what on earth is all this fuss about? The girl doesn't belong to anybody—is no use to anybody but me. [He goes to Mrs. Pearce and begins coaxing]. You can adopt her, Mrs. Pearce: I'm sure a daughter would be a great amusement to you. Now don't make any more fuss. Take her downstairs; and—

 

MRS. PEARCE. But what's to become of her? Is she to be paid anything? Do be sensible, sir.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, pay her whatever is necessary: put it down in the housekeeping book. [Impatiently] What on earth will she want with money? She'll have her food and her clothes. She'll only drink if you give her money.

 

LIZA [turning on him] Oh you are a brute. It's a lie: nobody ever saw the sign of liquor on me. [She goes back to her chair and plants herself there defiantly].

 

PICKERING [in good-humored remonstrance] Does it occur to you, Higgins, that the girl has some feelings?

 

HIGGINS [looking critically at her] Oh no, I don't think so. Not any feelings that we need bother about. [Cheerily] Have you, Eliza?

 

LIZA. I got my feelings same as anyone else.

 

HIGGINS [to Pickering, reflectively] You see the difficulty?

 

PICKERING. Eh? What difficulty?

 

HIGGINS. To get her to talk grammar. The mere pronunciation is easy enough.

 

LIZA. I don't want to talk grammar. I want to talk like a lady.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Will you please keep to the point, Mr. Higgins. I want to know on what terms the girl is to be here. Is she to have any wages? And what is to become of her when you've finished your teaching? You must look ahead a little.

 

HIGGINS [impatiently] What's to become of her if I leave her in the gutter? Tell me that, Mrs. Pearce.

 

MRS. PEARCE. That's her own business, not yours, Mr. Higgins.

 

HIGGINS. Well, when I've done with her, we can throw her back into the gutter; and then it will be her own business again; so that's all right.

 

LIZA. Oh, you've no feeling heart in you: you don't care for nothing but yourself [she rises and takes the floor resolutely]. Here! I've had enough of this. I'm going [making for the door]. You ought to be ashamed of yourself, you ought.

 

HIGGINS [snatching a chocolate cream from the piano, his eyes suddenly beginning to twinkle with mischief] Have some chocolates, Eliza.

 

LIZA [halting, tempted] How do I know what might be in them? I've heard of girls being drugged by the like of you.

 

Higgins whips out his penknife; cuts a chocolate in two; puts one half into his mouth and bolts it; and offers her the other half.

 

HIGGINS. Pledge of good faith, Eliza. I eat one half you eat the other.

 

[Liza opens her mouth to retort: he pops the half chocolate into it]. You shall have boxes of them, barrels of them, every day. You shall live on them. Eh?

 

LIZA [who has disposed of the chocolate after being nearly choked by it] I wouldn't have ate it, only I'm too ladylike to take it out of my mouth.

 

HIGGINS. Listen, Eliza. I think you said you came in a taxi.

 

LIZA. Well, what if I did? I've as good a right to take a taxi as anyone else.

 

HIGGINS. You have, Eliza; and in future you shall have as many taxis as you want. You shall go up and down and round the town in a taxi every day. Think of that, Eliza.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Mr. Higgins: you're tempting the girl. It's not right. She should think of the future.

 

HIGGINS. At her age! Nonsense! Time enough to think of the future when you haven't any future to think of. No, Eliza: do as this lady does: think of other people's futures; but never think of your own. Think of chocolates, and taxis, and gold, and diamonds.

 

LIZA. No: I don't want no gold and no diamonds. I'm a good girl, I am. [She sits down again, with an attempt at dignity].

 

HIGGINS. You shall remain so, Eliza, under the care of Mrs. Pearce. And you shall marry an officer in the Guards, with a beautiful moustache: the son of a marquis, who will disinherit him for marrying you, but will relent when he sees your beauty and goodness—

 

PICKERING. Excuse me, Higgins; but I really must interfere. Mrs. Pearce is quite right. If this girl is to put herself in your hands for six months for an experiment in teaching, she must understand thoroughly what she's doing.

 

HIGGINS. How can she? She's incapable of understanding anything. Besides, do any of us understand what we are doing? If we did, would we ever do it?

 

PICKERING. Very clever, Higgins; but not sound sense. [To Eliza] Miss Doolittle—

 

LIZA [overwhelmed] Ah—ah—ow—oo!

 

HIGGINS. There! That's all you get out of Eliza. Ah—ah—ow—oo! No use explaining. As a military man you ought to know that. Give her her orders: that's what she wants. Eliza: you are to live here for the next six months, learning how to speak beautifully, like a lady in a florist's shop. If you're good and do whatever you're told, you shall sleep in a proper bedroom, and have lots to eat, and money to buy chocolates and take rides in taxis. If you're naughty and idle you will sleep in the back kitchen among the black beetles, and be walloped by Mrs. Pearce with a broomstick. At the end of six months you shall go to Buckingham Palace in a carriage, beautifully dressed. If the King finds out you're not a lady, you will be taken by the police to the Tower of London, where your head will be cut off as a warning to other presumptuous flower girls. If you are not found out, you shall have a present of seven-and-sixpence to start life with as a lady in a shop. If you refuse this offer you will be a most ungrateful and wicked girl; and the angels will weep for you. [To Pickering] Now are you satisfied, Pickering? [To Mrs. Pearce] Can I put it more plainly and fairly, Mrs. Pearce?

 

MRS. PEARCE [patiently] I think you'd better let me speak to the girl properly in private. I don't know that I can take charge of her or consent to the arrangement at all. Of course I know you don't mean her any harm; but when you get what you call interested in people's accents, you never think or care what may happen to them or you. Come with me, Eliza.

 

HIGGINS. That's all right. Thank you, Mrs. Pearce. Bundle her off to the bath-room.

 

LIZA [rising reluctantly and suspiciously] You're a great bully, you are. I won't stay here if I don't like. I won't let nobody wallop me. I never asked to go to Bucknam Palace, I didn't. I was never in trouble with the police, not me. I'm a good girl—

 

MRS. PEARCE. Don't answer back, girl. You don't understand the gentleman. Come with me. [She leads the way to the door, and holds it open for Eliza].

 

LIZA [as she goes out] Well, what I say is right. I won't go near the king, not if I'm going to have my head cut off. If I'd known what I was letting myself in for, I wouldn't have come here. I always been a good girl; and I never offered to say a word to him; and I don't owe him nothing; and I don't care; and I won't be put upon; and I have my feelings the same as anyone else—

 

Mrs. Pearce shuts the door; and Eliza's plaints are no longer audible. Pickering comes from the hearth to the chair and sits astride it with his arms on the back.

 

PICKERING. Excuse the straight question, Higgins. Are you a man of good character where women are concerned?

 

HIGGINS [moodily] Have you ever met a man of good character where women are concerned?

 

PICKERING. Yes: very frequently.

 

HIGGINS [dogmatically, lifting himself on his hands to the level of the piano, and sitting on it with a bounce] Well, I haven't. I find that the moment I let a woman make friends with me, she becomes jealous, exacting, suspicious, and a damned nuisance. I find that the moment I let myself make friends with a woman, I become selfish and tyrannical. Women upset everything. When you let them into your life, you find that the woman is driving at one thing and you're driving at another.

 

PICKERING. At what, for example?

 

HIGGINS [coming off the piano restlessly] Oh, Lord knows! I suppose the woman wants to live her own life; and the man wants to live his; and each tries to drag the other on to the wrong track. One wants to go north and the other south; and the result is that both have to go east, though they both hate the east wind. [He sits down on the bench at the keyboard]. So here I am, a confirmed old bachelor, and likely to remain so.

 

PICKERING [rising and standing over him gravely] Come, Higgins! You know what I mean. If I'm to be in this business I shall feel responsible for that girl. I hope it's understood that no advantage is to be taken of her position.

 

HIGGINS. What! That thing! Sacred, I assure you. [Rising to explain] You see, she'll be a pupil; and teaching would be impossible unless pupils were sacred. I've taught scores of American millionairesses how to speak English: the best looking women in the world. I'm seasoned. They might as well be blocks of wood. I might as well be a block of wood. It's—

 

Mrs. Pearce opens the door. She has Eliza's hat in her hand. Pickering retires to the easy-chair at the hearth and sits down.

 

HIGGINS [eagerly] Well, Mrs. Pearce: is it all right?

 

MRS. PEARCE [at the door] I just wish to trouble you with a word, if I may, Mr. Higgins.

 

HIGGINS. Yes, certainly. Come in. [She comes forward]. Don't burn that, Mrs. Pearce. I'll keep it as a curiosity. [He takes the hat].

 

MRS. PEARCE. Handle it carefully, sir, please. I had to promise her not to burn it; but I had better put it in the oven for a while.

 

HIGGINS [putting it down hastily on the piano] Oh! thank you. Well, what have you to say to me?

 

PICKERING. Am I in the way?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Not at all, sir. Mr. Higgins: will you please be very particular what you say before the girl?

 

HIGGINS [sternly] Of course. I'm always particular about what I say. Why do you say this to me?

 

MRS. PEARCE [unmoved] No, sir: you're not at all particular when you've mislaid anything or when you get a little impatient. Now it doesn't matter before me: I'm used to it. But you really must not swear before the girl.

 

HIGGINS [indignantly] I swear! [Most emphatically] I never swear. I detest the habit. What the devil do you mean?

 

MRS. PEARCE [stolidly] That's what I mean, sir. You swear a great deal too much. I don't mind your damning and blasting, and what the devil and where the devil and who the devil—

 

HIGGINS. Really! Mrs. Pearce: this language from your lips!

 

MRS. PEARCE [not to be put off]—but there is a certain word I must ask you not to use. The girl has just used it herself because the bath was too hot. It begins with the same letter as bath. She knows no better: she learnt it at her mother's knee. But she must not hear it from your lips.

 

HIGGINS [loftily] I cannot charge myself with having ever uttered it, Mrs. Pearce. [She looks at him steadfastly. He adds, hiding an uneasy conscience with a judicial air] Except perhaps in a moment of extreme and justifiable excitement.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Only this morning, sir, you applied it to your boots, to the butter, and to the brown bread.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, that! Mere alliteration, Mrs. Pearce, natural to a poet.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Well, sir, whatever you choose to call it, I beg you not to let the girl hear you repeat it.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, very well, very well. Is that all?

 

MRS. PEARCE. No, sir. We shall have to be very particular with this girl as to personal cleanliness.

 

HIGGINS. Certainly. Quite right. Most important.

 

MRS. PEARCE. I mean not to be slovenly about her dress or untidy in leaving things about.

 

HIGGINS [going to her solemnly] Just so. I intended to call your attention to that [He passes on to Pickering, who is enjoying the conversation immensely]. It is these little things that matter, Pickering. Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money. [He comes to anchor on the hearthrug, with the air of a man in an unassailable position].

 

MRS. PEARCE. Yes, sir. Then might I ask you not to come down to breakfast in your dressing-gown, or at any rate not to use it as a napkin to the extent you do, sir. And if you would be so good as not to eat everything off the same plate, and to remember not to put the porridge saucepan out of your hand on the clean tablecloth, it would be a better example to the girl. You know you nearly choked yourself with a fishbone in the jam only last week.

 

HIGGINS [routed from the hearthrug and drifting back to the piano] I may do these things sometimes in absence of mind; but surely I don't do them habitually. [Angrily] By the way: my dressing-gown smells most damnably of benzine.

 

MRS. PEARCE. No doubt it does, Mr. Higgins. But if you will wipe your fingers—

 

HIGGINS [yelling] Oh very well, very well: I'll wipe them in my hair in future.

 

MRS. PEARCE. I hope you're not offended, Mr. Higgins.

 

HIGGINS [shocked at finding himself thought capable of an unamiable sentiment] Not at all, not at all. You're quite right, Mrs. Pearce: I shall be particularly careful before the girl. Is that all?

 

MRS. PEARCE. No, sir. Might she use some of those Japanese dresses you brought from abroad? I really can't put her back into her old things.

 

HIGGINS. Certainly. Anything you like. Is that all?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Thank you, sir. That's all. [She goes out].

 

HIGGINS. You know, Pickering, that woman has the most extraordinary ideas about me. Here I am, a shy, diffident sort of man. I've never been able to feel really grown-up and tremendous, like other chaps. And yet she's firmly persuaded that I'm an arbitrary overbearing bossing kind of person. I can't account for it.

 

Mrs. Pearce returns.

 

MRS. PEARCE. If you please, sir, the trouble's beginning already. There's a dustman downstairs, Alfred Doolittle, wants to see you. He says you have his daughter here.

 

PICKERING [rising] Phew! I say! [He retreats to the hearthrug].

 

HIGGINS [promptly] Send the blackguard up.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Oh, very well, sir. [She goes out].

 

PICKERING. He may not be a blackguard, Higgins.

 

HIGGINS. Nonsense. Of course he's a blackguard.

 

PICKERING. Whether he is or not, I'm afraid we shall have some trouble with him.

 

HIGGINS [confidently] Oh no: I think not. If there's any trouble he shall have it with me, not I with him. And we are sure to get something interesting out of him.

 

PICKERING. About the girl?

 

HIGGINS. No. I mean his dialect.

 

PICKERING. Oh!

 

MRS. PEARCE [at the door] Doolittle, sir. [She admits Doolittle and retires].

 

Alfred Doolittle is an elderly but vigorous dustman, clad in the costume of his profession, including a hat with a back brim covering his neck and shoulders. He has well marked and rather interesting features, and seems equally free from fear and conscience. He has a remarkably expressive voice, the result of a habit of giving vent to his feelings without reserve. His present pose is that of wounded honor and stern resolution.

 

DOOLITTLE [at the door, uncertain which of the two gentlemen is his man] Professor Higgins?

 

HIGGINS. Here. Good morning. Sit down.

 

DOOLITTLE. Morning, Governor. [He sits down magisterially] I come about a very serious matter, Governor.

 

HIGGINS [to Pickering] Brought up in Hounslow. Mother Welsh, I should think. [Doolittle opens his mouth, amazed. Higgins continues] What do you want, Doolittle?

 

DOOLITTLE [menacingly] I want my daughter: that's what I want. See?

 

HIGGINS. Of course you do. You're her father, aren't you? You don't suppose anyone else wants her, do you? I'm glad to see you have some spark of family feeling left. She's upstairs. Take her away at once.

 

DOOLITTLE [rising, fearfully taken aback] What!

 

HIGGINS. Take her away. Do you suppose I'm going to keep your daughter for you?

 

DOOLITTLE [remonstrating] Now, now, look here, Governor. Is this reasonable? Is it fair to take advantage of a man like this? The girl belongs to me. You got her. Where do I come in? [He sits down again].

 

HIGGINS. Your daughter had the audacity to come to my house and ask me to teach her how to speak properly so that she could get a place in a flower-shop. This gentleman and my housekeeper have been here all the time. [Bullying him] How dare you come here and attempt to blackmail me? You sent her here on purpose.

 

DOOLITTLE [protesting] No, Governor.

 

HIGGINS. You must have. How else could you possibly know that she is here?

 

DOOLITTLE. Don't take a man up like that, Governor.

 

HIGGINS. The police shall take you up. This is a plant—a plot to extort money by threats. I shall telephone for the police [he goes resolutely to the telephone and opens the directory].

 

DOOLITTLE. Have I asked you for a brass farthing? I leave it to the gentleman here: have I said a word about money?

 

HIGGINS [throwing the book aside and marching down on Doolittle with a poser] What else did you come for?

 

DOOLITTLE [sweetly] Well, what would a man come for? Be human, governor.

 

HIGGINS [disarmed] Alfred: did you put her up to it?

 

DOOLITTLE. So help me, Governor, I never did. I take my Bible oath I ain't seen the girl these two months past.

 

HIGGINS. Then how did you know she was here?

 

DOOLITTLE ["most musical, most melancholy"] I'll tell you, Governor, if you'll only let me get a word in. I'm willing to tell you. I'm wanting to tell you. I'm waiting to tell you.

 

HIGGINS. Pickering: this chap has a certain natural gift of rhetoric. Observe the rhythm of his native woodnotes wild. "I'm willing to tell you: I'm wanting to tell you: I'm waiting to tell you." Sentimental rhetoric! That's the Welsh strain in him. It also accounts for his mendacity and dishonesty.

 

PICKERING. Oh, PLEASE, Higgins: I'm west country myself. [To Doolittle] How did you know the girl was here if you didn't send her?

 

DOOLITTLE. It was like this, Governor. The girl took a boy in the taxi to give him a jaunt. Son of her landlady, he is. He hung about on the chance of her giving him another ride home. Well, she sent him back for her luggage when she heard you was willing for her to stop here. I met the boy at the corner of Long Acre and Endell Street.

 

HIGGINS. Public house. Yes?

 

DOOLITTLE. The poor man's club, Governor: why shouldn't I?

 

PICKERING. Do let him tell his story, Higgins.

 

DOOLITTLE. He told me what was up. And I ask you, what was my feelings and my duty as a father? I says to the boy, "You bring me the luggage," I says—

 

PICKERING. Why didn't you go for it yourself?

 

DOOLITTLE. Landlady wouldn't have trusted me with it, Governor. She's that kind of woman: you know. I had to give the boy a penny afore he trusted me with it, the little swine. I brought it to her just to oblige you like, and make myself agreeable. That's all.

 

HIGGINS. How much luggage?

 

DOOLITTLE. Musical instrument, Governor. A few pictures, a trifle of jewelry, and a bird-cage. She said she didn't want no clothes. What was I to think from that, Governor? I ask you as a parent what was I to think?

 

HIGGINS. So you came to rescue her from worse than death, eh?

 

DOOLITTLE [appreciatively: relieved at being understood] Just so, Governor. That's right.

 

PICKERING. But why did you bring her luggage if you intended to take her away?

 

DOOLITTLE. Have I said a word about taking her away? Have I now?

 

HIGGINS [determinedly] You're going to take her away, double quick. [He crosses to the hearth and rings the bell].

 

DOOLITTLE [rising] No, Governor. Don't say that. I'm not the man to stand in my girl's light. Here's a career opening for her, as you might say; and—

 

Mrs. Pearce opens the door and awaits orders.

 

HIGGINS. Mrs. Pearce: this is Eliza's father. He has come to take her away. Give her to him. [He goes back to the piano, with an air of washing his hands of the whole affair].

 

DOOLITTLE. No. This is a misunderstanding. Listen here—

 

MRS. PEARCE. He can't take her away, Mr. Higgins: how can he? You told me to burn her clothes.

 

DOOLITTLE. That's right. I can't carry the girl through the streets like a blooming monkey, can I? I put it to you.

 

HIGGINS. You have put it to me that you want your daughter. Take your daughter. If she has no clothes go out and buy her some.

 

DOOLITTLE [desperate] Where's the clothes she come in? Did I burn them or did your missus here?

 

MRS. PEARCE. I am the housekeeper, if you please. I have sent for some clothes for your girl. When they come you can take her away. You can wait in the kitchen. This way, please.

 

Doolittle, much troubled, accompanies her to the door; then hesitates; finally turns confidentially to Higgins.

 

DOOLITTLE. Listen here, Governor. You and me is men of the world, ain't we?

 

HIGGINS. Oh! Men of the world, are we? You'd better go, Mrs. Pearce.

 

MRS. PEARCE. I think so, indeed, sir. [She goes, with dignity].

 

PICKERING. The floor is yours, Mr. Doolittle.

 

DOOLITTLE [to Pickering] I thank you, Governor. [To Higgins, who takes refuge on the piano bench, a little overwhelmed by the proximity of his visitor; for Doolittle has a professional flavor of dust about him]. Well, the truth is, I've taken a sort of fancy to you, Governor; and if you want the girl, I'm not so set on having her back home again but what I might be open to an arrangement. Regarded in the light of a young woman, she's a fine handsome girl. As a daughter she's not worth her keep; and so I tell you straight. All I ask is my rights as a father; and you're the last man alive to expect me to let her go for nothing; for I can see you're one of the straight sort, Governor. Well, what's a five pound note to you? And what's Eliza to me? [He returns to his chair and sits down judicially].

 

PICKERING. I think you ought to know, Doolittle, that Mr. Higgins's intentions are entirely honorable.

 

DOOLITTLE. Course they are, Governor. If I thought they wasn't, I'd ask fifty.

 

HIGGINS [revolted] Do you mean to say, you callous rascal, that you would sell your daughter for 50 pounds?

 

DOOLITTLE. Not in a general way I wouldn't; but to oblige a gentleman like you I'd do a good deal, I do assure you.

 

PICKERING. Have you no morals, man?

 

DOOLITTLE [unabashed] Can't afford them, Governor. Neither could you if you was as poor as me. Not that I mean any harm, you know. But if Liza is going to have a bit out of this, why not me too?

 

HIGGINS [troubled] I don't know what to do, Pickering. There can be no question that as a matter of morals it's a positive crime to give this chap a farthing. And yet I feel a sort of rough justice in his claim.

 

DOOLITTLE. That's it, Governor. That's all I say. A father's heart, as it were.

 

PICKERING. Well, I know the feeling; but really it seems hardly right—

 

DOOLITTLE. Don't say that, Governor. Don't look at it that way. What am I, Governors both? I ask you, what am I? I'm one of the undeserving poor: that's what I am. Think of what that means to a man. It means that he's up agen middle class morality all the time. If there's anything going, and I put in for a bit of it, it's always the same story: "You're undeserving; so you can't have it." But my needs is as great as the most deserving widow's that ever got money out of six different charities in one week for the death of the same husband. I don't need less than a deserving man: I need more. I don't eat less hearty than him; and I drink a lot more. I want a bit of amusement, cause I'm a thinking man. I want cheerfulness and a song and a band when I feel low. Well, they charge me just the same for everything as they charge the deserving. What is middle class morality? Just an excuse for never giving me anything. Therefore, I ask you, as two gentlemen, not to play that game on me. I'm playing straight with you. I ain't pretending to be deserving. I'm undeserving; and I mean to go on being undeserving. I like it; and that's the truth. Will you take advantage of a man's nature to do him out of the price of his own daughter what he's brought up and fed and clothed by the sweat of his brow until she's growed big enough to be interesting to you two gentlemen? Is five pounds unreasonable? I put it to you; and I leave it to you.

 

HIGGINS [rising, and going over to Pickering] Pickering: if we were to take this man in hand for three months, he could choose between a seat in the Cabinet and a popular pulpit in Wales.

 

PICKERING. What do you say to that, Doolittle?

 

DOOLITTLE. Not me, Governor, thank you kindly. I've heard all the preachers and all the prime ministers—for I'm a thinking man and game for politics or religion or social reform same as all the other amusements—and I tell you it's a dog's life anyway you look at it. Undeserving poverty is my line. Taking one station in society with another, it's—it's—well, it's the only one that has any ginger in it, to my taste.

 

HIGGINS. I suppose we must give him a fiver.

 

PICKERING. He'll make a bad use of it, I'm afraid.

 

DOOLITTLE. Not me, Governor, so help me I won't. Don't you be afraid that I'll save it and spare it and live idle on it. There won't be a penny of it left by Monday: I'll have to go to work same as if I'd never had it. It won't pauperize me, you bet. Just one good spree for myself and the missus, giving pleasure to ourselves and employment to others, and satisfaction to you to think it's not been throwed away. You couldn't spend it better.

 

HIGGINS [taking out his pocket book and coming between Doolittle and the piano] This is irresistible. Let's give him ten. [He offers two notes to the dustman].

 

DOOLITTLE. No, Governor. She wouldn't have the heart to spend ten; and perhaps I shouldn't neither. Ten pounds is a lot of money: it makes a man feel prudent like; and then goodbye to happiness. You give me what I ask you, Governor: not a penny more, and not a penny less.

 

PICKERING. Why don't you marry that missus of yours? I rather draw the line at encouraging that sort of immorality.

 

DOOLITTLE. Tell her so, Governor: tell her so. I'm willing. It's me that suffers by it. I've no hold on her. I got to be agreeable to her. I got to give her presents. I got to buy her clothes something sinful. I'm a slave to that woman, Governor, just because I'm not her lawful husband. And she knows it too. Catch her marrying me! Take my advice, Governor: marry Eliza while she's young and don't know no better. If you don't you'll be sorry for it after. If you do, she'll be sorry for it after; but better you than her, because you're a man, and she's only a woman and don't know how to be happy anyhow.

 

HIGGINS. Pickering: if we listen to this man another minute, we shall have no convictions left. [To Doolittle] Five pounds I think you said.

 

DOOLITTLE. Thank you kindly, Governor.

 

HIGGINS. You're sure you won't take ten?

 

DOOLITTLE. Not now. Another time, Governor.

 

HIGGINS [handing him a five-pound note] Here you are.

 

DOOLITTLE. Thank you, Governor. Good morning.

 

[He hurries to the door, anxious to get away with his booty. When he opens it he is confronted with a dainty and exquisitely clean young Japanese lady in a simple blue cotton kimono printed cunningly with small white jasmine blossoms. Mrs. Pearce is with her. He gets out of her way deferentially and apologizes]. Beg pardon, miss.

 

THE JAPANESE LADY. Garn! Don't you know your own daughter?

 

DOOLITTLE {exclaiming    Bly me! it's Eliza!

HIGGINS {simul-               What's that! This!

PICKERING {taneously     By Jove!

LIZA. Don't I look silly?

 

HIGGINS. Silly?

 

MRS. PEARCE [at the door] Now, Mr. Higgins, please don't say anything to make the girl conceited about herself.

 

HIGGINS [conscientiously] Oh! Quite right, Mrs. Pearce. [To Eliza] Yes: damned silly.

 

MRS. PEARCE. Please, sir.

 

HIGGINS [correcting himself] I mean extremely silly.

 

LIZA. I should look all right with my hat on. [She takes up her hat; puts it on; and walks across the room to the fireplace with a fashionable air].

 

HIGGINS. A new fashion, by George! And it ought to look horrible!

 

DOOLITTLE [with fatherly pride] Well, I never thought she'd clean up as good looking as that, Governor. She's a credit to me, ain't she?

 

LIZA. I tell you, it's easy to clean up here. Hot and cold water on tap, just as much as you like, there is. Woolly towels, there is; and a towel horse so hot, it burns your fingers. Soft brushes to scrub yourself, and a wooden bowl of soap smelling like primroses. Now I know why ladies is so clean. Washing's a treat for them. Wish they saw what it is for the like of me!

 

HIGGINS. I'm glad the bath-room met with your approval.

 

LIZA. It didn't: not all of it; and I don't care who hears me say it. Mrs. Pearce knows.

 

HIGGINS. What was wrong, Mrs. Pearce?

 

MRS. PEARCE [blandly] Oh, nothing, sir. It doesn't matter.

 

LIZA. I had a good mind to break it. I didn't know which way to look. But I hung a towel over it, I did.

 

HIGGINS. Over what?

 

MRS. PEARCE. Over the looking-glass, sir.

 

HIGGINS. Doolittle: you have brought your daughter up too strictly.

 

DOOLITTLE. Me! I never brought her up at all, except to give her a lick of a strap now and again. Don't put it on me, Governor. She ain't accustomed to it, you see: that's all. But she'll soon pick up your free-and-easy ways.

 

LIZA. I'm a good girl, I am; and I won't pick up no free and easy ways.

 

HIGGINS. Eliza: if you say again that you're a good girl, your father shall take you home.

 

LIZA. Not him. You don't know my father. All he come here for was to touch you for some money to get drunk on.

 

DOOLITTLE. Well, what else would I want money for? To put into the plate in church, I suppose. [She puts out her tongue at him. He is so incensed by this that Pickering presently finds it necessary to step between them]. Don't you give me none of your lip; and don't let me hear you giving this gentleman any of it neither, or you'll hear from me about it. See?

 

HIGGINS. Have you any further advice to give her before you go, Doolittle? Your blessing, for instance.

 

DOOLITTLE. No, Governor: I ain't such a mug as to put up my children to all I know myself. Hard enough to hold them in without that. If you want Eliza's mind improved, Governor, you do it yourself with a strap. So long, gentlemen. [He turns to go].

 

HIGGINS [impressively] Stop. You'll come regularly to see your daughter. It's your duty, you know. My brother is a clergyman; and he could help you in your talks with her.

 

DOOLITTLE [evasively] Certainly. I'll come, Governor. Not just this week, because I have a job at a distance. But later on you may depend on me. Afternoon, gentlemen. Afternoon, ma'am. [He takes off his hat to Mrs. Pearce, who disdains the salutation and goes out. He winks at Higgins, thinking him probably a fellow sufferer from Mrs. Pearce's difficult disposition, and follows her].

 

LIZA. Don't you believe the old liar. He'd as soon you set a bull-dog on him as a clergyman. You won't see him again in a hurry.

 

HIGGINS. I don't want to, Eliza. Do you?

 

LIZA. Not me. I don't want never to see him again, I don't. He's a disgrace to me, he is, collecting dust, instead of working at his trade.

 

PICKERING. What is his trade, Eliza?

 

LIZA. Talking money out of other people's pockets into his own. His proper trade's a navvy; and he works at it sometimes too—for exercise—and earns good money at it. Ain't you going to call me Miss Doolittle any more?

 

PICKERING. I beg your pardon, Miss Doolittle. It was a slip of the tongue.

 

LIZA. Oh, I don't mind; only it sounded so genteel. I should just like to take a taxi to the corner of Tottenham Court Road and get out there and tell it to wait for me, just to put the girls in their place a bit. I wouldn't speak to them, you know.

 

PICKERING. Better wait til we get you something really fashionable.

 

HIGGINS. Besides, you shouldn't cut your old friends now that you have risen in the world. That's what we call snobbery.

 

LIZA. You don't call the like of them my friends now, I should hope. They've took it out of me often enough with their ridicule when they had the chance; and now I mean to get a bit of my own back. But if I'm to have fashionable clothes, I'll wait. I should like to have some. Mrs. Pearce says you're going to give me some to wear in bed at night different to what I wear in the daytime; but it do seem a waste of money when you could get something to show. Besides, I never could fancy changing into cold things on a winter night.

 

MRS. PEARCE [coming back] Now, Eliza. The new things have come for you to try on.

 

LIZA. Ah—ow—oo—ooh! [She rushes out].

 

MRS. PEARCE [following her] Oh, don't rush about like that, girl [She shuts the door behind her].

 

HIGGINS. Pickering: we have taken on a stiff job.

 

PICKERING [with conviction] Higgins: we have.

 

 

ACT III

 

It is Mrs. Higgins's at-home day. Nobody has yet arrived. Her drawing-room, in a flat on Chelsea embankment, has three windows looking on the river; and the ceiling is not so lofty as it would be in an older house of the same pretension. The windows are open, giving access to a balcony with flowers in pots. If you stand with your face to the windows, you have the fireplace on your left and the door in the right-hand wall close to the corner nearest the windows.

 

Mrs. Higgins was brought up on Morris and Burne Jones; and her room, which is very unlike her son's room in Wimpole Street, is not crowded with furniture and little tables and nicknacks. In the middle of the room there is a big ottoman; and this, with the carpet, the Morris wall-papers, and the Morris chintz window curtains and brocade covers of the ottoman and its cushions, supply all the ornament, and are much too handsome to be hidden by odds and ends of useless things. A few good oil-paintings from the exhibitions in the Grosvenor Gallery thirty years ago (the Burne Jones, not the Whistler side of them) are on the walls. The only landscape is a Cecil Lawson on the scale of a Rubens. There is a portrait of Mrs. Higgins as she was when she defied fashion in her youth in one of the beautiful Rossettian costumes which, when caricatured by people who did not understand, led to the absurdities of popular estheticism in the eighteen-seventies.

 

In the corner diagonally opposite the door Mrs. Higgins, now over sixty and long past taking the trouble to dress out of the fashion, sits writing at an elegantly simple writing-table with a bell button within reach of her hand. There is a Chippendale chair further back in the room between her and the window nearest her side. At the other side of the room, further forward, is an Elizabethan chair roughly carved in the taste of Inigo Jones. On the same side a piano in a decorated case. The corner between the fireplace and the window is occupied by a divan cushioned in Morris chintz.

 

It is between four and five in the afternoon.

 

The door is opened violently; and Higgins enters with his hat on.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [dismayed] Henry! [scolding him] What are you doing here to-day? It is my at home day: you promised not to come. [As he bends to kiss her, she takes his hat off, and presents it to him].

 

HIGGINS. Oh bother! [He throws the hat down on the table].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Go home at once.

 

HIGGINS [kissing her] I know, mother. I came on purpose.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. But you mustn't. I'm serious, Henry. You offend all my friends: they stop coming whenever they meet you.

 

HIGGINS. Nonsense! I know I have no small talk; but people don't mind. [He sits on the settee].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Oh! don't they? Small talk indeed! What about your large talk? Really, dear, you mustn't stay.

 

HIGGINS. I must. I've a job for you. A phonetic job.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. No use, dear. I'm sorry; but I can't get round your vowels; and though I like to get pretty postcards in your patent shorthand, I always have to read the copies in ordinary writing you so thoughtfully send me.

 

HIGGINS. Well, this isn't a phonetic job.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. You said it was.

 

HIGGINS. Not your part of it. I've picked up a girl.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Does that mean that some girl has picked you up?

 

HIGGINS. Not at all. I don't mean a love affair.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. What a pity!

 

HIGGINS. Why?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Well, you never fall in love with anyone under forty-five. When will you discover that there are some rather nice-looking young women about?

 

HIGGINS. Oh, I can't be bothered with young women. My idea of a loveable woman is something as like you as possible. I shall never get into the way of seriously liking young women: some habits lie too deep to be changed. [Rising abruptly and walking about, jingling his money and his keys in his trouser pockets] Besides, they're all idiots.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Do you know what you would do if you really loved me, Henry?

 

HIGGINS. Oh bother! What? Marry, I suppose?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. No. Stop fidgeting and take your hands out of your pockets. [With a gesture of despair, he obeys and sits down again]. That's a good boy. Now tell me about the girl.

 

HIGGINS. She's coming to see you.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. I don't remember asking her.

 

HIGGINS. You didn't. I asked her. If you'd known her you wouldn't have asked her.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Indeed! Why?

 

HIGGINS. Well, it's like this. She's a common flower girl. I picked her off the kerbstone.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. And invited her to my at-home!

 

HIGGINS [rising and coming to her to coax her] Oh, that'll be all right. I've taught her to speak properly; and she has strict orders as to her behavior. She's to keep to two subjects: the weather and everybody's health—Fine day and How do you do, you know—and not to let herself go on things in general. That will be safe.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Safe! To talk about our health! about our insides! perhaps about our outsides! How could you be so silly, Henry?

 

HIGGINS [impatiently] Well, she must talk about something. [He controls himself and sits down again]. Oh, she'll be all right: don't you fuss. Pickering is in it with me. I've a sort of bet on that I'll pass her off as a duchess in six months. I started on her some months ago; and she's getting on like a house on fire. I shall win my bet. She has a quick ear; and she's been easier to teach than my middle-class pupils because she's had to learn a complete new language. She talks English almost as you talk French.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. That's satisfactory, at all events.

 

HIGGINS. Well, it is and it isn't.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. What does that mean?

 

HIGGINS. You see, I've got her pronunciation all right; but you have to consider not only how a girl pronounces, but what she pronounces; and that's where—

 

They are interrupted by the parlor-maid, announcing guests.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Mrs. and Miss Eynsford Hill. [She withdraws].

 

HIGGINS. Oh Lord! [He rises; snatches his hat from the table; and makes for the door; but before he reaches it his mother introduces him].

 

Mrs. and Miss Eynsford Hill are the mother and daughter who sheltered from the rain in Covent Garden. The mother is well bred, quiet, and has the habitual anxiety of straitened means. The daughter has acquired a gay air of being very much at home in society: the bravado of genteel poverty.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [to Mrs. Higgins] How do you do? [They shake hands].

 

MISS EYNSFORD HILL. How d'you do? [She shakes].

 

MRS. HIGGINS [introducing] My son Henry.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. Your celebrated son! I have so longed to meet you, Professor Higgins.

 

HIGGINS [glumly, making no movement in her direction] Delighted. [He backs against the piano and bows brusquely].

 

Miss EYNSFORD HILL [going to him with confident familiarity] How do you do?

 

HIGGINS [staring at her] I've seen you before somewhere. I haven't the ghost of a notion where; but I've heard your voice. [Drearily] It doesn't matter. You'd better sit down.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. I'm sorry to say that my celebrated son has no manners. You mustn't mind him.

 

MISS EYNSFORD HILL [gaily] I don't. [She sits in the Elizabethan chair].

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [a little bewildered] Not at all. [She sits on the ottoman between her daughter and Mrs. Higgins, who has turned her chair away from the writing-table].

 

HIGGINS. Oh, have I been rude? I didn't mean to be. [He goes to the central window, through which, with his back to the company, he contemplates the river and the flowers in Battersea Park on the opposite bank as if they were a frozen dessert.]

 

The parlor-maid returns, ushering in Pickering.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Colonel Pickering [She withdraws].

 

PICKERING. How do you do, Mrs. Higgins?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. So glad you've come. Do you know Mrs. Eynsford Hill—Miss Eynsford Hill? [Exchange of bows. The Colonel brings the Chippendale chair a little forward between Mrs. Hill and Mrs. Higgins, and sits down].

 

PICKERING. Has Henry told you what we've come for?

 

HIGGINS [over his shoulder] We were interrupted: damn it!

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Oh Henry, Henry, really!

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [half rising] Are we in the way?

 

MRS. HIGGINS [rising and making her sit down again] No, no. You couldn't have come more fortunately: we want you to meet a friend of ours.

 

HIGGINS [turning hopefully] Yes, by George! We want two or three people. You'll do as well as anybody else.

 

The parlor-maid returns, ushering Freddy.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Mr. Eynsford Hill.

 

HIGGINS [almost audibly, past endurance] God of Heaven! another of them.

 

FREDDY [shaking hands with Mrs. Higgins] Ahdedo?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Very good of you to come. [Introducing] Colonel Pickering.

 

FREDDY [bowing] Ahdedo?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. I don't think you know my son, Professor Higgins.

 

FREDDY [going to Higgins] Ahdedo?

 

HIGGINS [looking at him much as if he were a pickpocket] I'll take my oath I've met you before somewhere. Where was it?

 

FREDDY. I don't think so.

 

HIGGINS [resignedly] It don't matter, anyhow. Sit down. He shakes Freddy's hand, and almost slings him on the ottoman with his face to the windows; then comes round to the other side of it.

 

HIGGINS. Well, here we are, anyhow! [He sits down on the ottoman next Mrs. Eynsford Hill, on her left.] And now, what the devil are we going to talk about until Eliza comes?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Henry: you are the life and soul of the Royal Society's soirees; but really you're rather trying on more commonplace occasions.

 

HIGGINS. Am I? Very sorry. [Beaming suddenly] I suppose I am, you know. [Uproariously] Ha, ha!

 

MISS EYNSFORD HILL [who considers Higgins quite eligible matrimonially] I sympathize. I haven't any small talk. If people would only be frank and say what they really think!

 

HIGGINS [relapsing into gloom] Lord forbid!

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [taking up her daughter's cue] But why?

 

HIGGINS. What they think they ought to think is bad enough, Lord knows; but what they really think would break up the whole show. Do you suppose it would be really agreeable if I were to come out now with what I really think?

 

MISS EYNSFORD HILL [gaily] Is it so very cynical?

 

HIGGINS. Cynical! Who the dickens said it was cynical? I mean it wouldn't be decent.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [seriously] Oh! I'm sure you don't mean that, Mr. Higgins.

 

HIGGINS. You see, we're all savages, more or less. We're supposed to be civilized and cultured—to know all about poetry and philosophy and art and science, and so on; but how many of us know even the meanings of these names? [To Miss Hill] What do you know of poetry? [To Mrs. Hill] What do you know of science? [Indicating Freddy] What does he know of art or science or anything else? What the devil do you imagine I know of philosophy?

 

MRS. HIGGINS [warningly] Or of manners, Henry?

 

THE PARLOR-MAID [opening the door] Miss Doolittle. [She withdraws].

 

HIGGINS [rising hastily and running to Mrs. Higgins] Here she is, mother. [He stands on tiptoe and makes signs over his mother's head to Eliza to indicate to her which lady is her hostess].

 

Eliza, who is exquisitely dressed, produces an impression of such remarkable distinction and beauty as she enters that they all rise, quite flustered. Guided by Higgins's signals, she comes to Mrs. Higgins with studied grace.

 

LIZA [speaking with pedantic correctness of pronunciation and great beauty of tone] How do you do, Mrs. Higgins? [She gasps slightly in making sure of the H in Higgins, but is quite successful]. Mr. Higgins told me I might come.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [cordially] Quite right: I'm very glad indeed to see you.

 

PICKERING. How do you do, Miss Doolittle?

 

LIZA [shaking hands with him] Colonel Pickering, is it not?

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. I feel sure we have met before, Miss Doolittle. I remember your eyes.

 

LIZA. How do you do? [She sits down on the ottoman gracefully in the place just left vacant by Higgins].

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [introducing] My daughter Clara.

 

LIZA. How do you do?

 

CLARA [impulsively] How do you do? [She sits down on the ottoman beside Eliza, devouring her with her eyes].

 

FREDDY [coming to their side of the ottoman] I've certainly had the pleasure.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [introducing] My son Freddy.

 

LIZA. How do you do?

 

Freddy bows and sits down in the Elizabethan chair, infatuated.

 

HIGGINS [suddenly] By George, yes: it all comes back to me! [They stare at him]. Covent Garden! [Lamentably] What a damned thing!

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Henry, please! [He is about to sit on the edge of the table]. Don't sit on my writing-table: you'll break it.

 

HIGGINS [sulkily] Sorry.

 

He goes to the divan, stumbling into the fender and over the fire-irons on his way; extricating himself with muttered imprecations; and finishing his disastrous journey by throwing himself so impatiently on the divan that he almost breaks it. Mrs. Higgins looks at him, but controls herself and says nothing.

 

A long and painful pause ensues.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [at last, conversationally] Will it rain, do you think?

 

LIZA. The shallow depression in the west of these islands is likely to move slowly in an easterly direction. There are no indications of any great change in the barometrical situation.

 

FREDDY. Ha! ha! how awfully funny!

 

LIZA. What is wrong with that, young man? I bet I got it right.

 

FREDDY. Killing!

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. I'm sure I hope it won't turn cold. There's so much influenza about. It runs right through our whole family regularly every spring.

 

LIZA [darkly] My aunt died of influenza: so they said.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [clicks her tongue sympathetically]!!!

 

LIZA [in the same tragic tone] But it's my belief they done the old woman in.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [puzzled] Done her in?

 

LIZA. Y-e-e-e-es, Lord love you! Why should she die of influenza? She come through diphtheria right enough the year before. I saw her with my own eyes. Fairly blue with it, she was. They all thought she was dead; but my father he kept ladling gin down her throat til she came to so sudden that she bit the bowl off the spoon.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [startled] Dear me!

 

LIZA [piling up the indictment] What call would a woman with that strength in her have to die of influenza? What become of her new straw hat that should have come to me? Somebody pinched it; and what I say is, them as pinched it done her in.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. What does doing her in mean?

 

HIGGINS [hastily] Oh, that's the new small talk. To do a person in means to kill them.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [to Eliza, horrified] You surely don't believe that your aunt was killed?

 

LIZA. Do I not! Them she lived with would have killed her for a hat-pin, let alone a hat.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. But it can't have been right for your father to pour spirits down her throat like that. It might have killed her.

 

LIZA. Not her. Gin was mother's milk to her. Besides, he'd poured so much down his own throat that he knew the good of it.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. Do you mean that he drank?

 

LIZA. Drank! My word! Something chronic.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. How dreadful for you!

 

LIZA. Not a bit. It never did him no harm what I could see. But then he did not keep it up regular. [Cheerfully] On the burst, as you might say, from time to time. And always more agreeable when he had a drop in. When he was out of work, my mother used to give him fourpence and tell him to go out and not come back until he'd drunk himself cheerful and loving-like. There's lots of women has to make their husbands drunk to make them fit to live with. [Now quite at her ease] You see, it's like this. If a man has a bit of a conscience, it always takes him when he's sober; and then it makes him low-spirited. A drop of booze just takes that off and makes him happy. [To Freddy, who is in convulsions of suppressed laughter] Here! what are you sniggering at?

 

FREDDY. The new small talk. You do it so awfully well.

 

LIZA. If I was doing it proper, what was you laughing at? [To Higgins] Have I said anything I oughtn't?

 

MRS. HIGGINS [interposing] Not at all, Miss Doolittle.

 

LIZA. Well, that's a mercy, anyhow. [Expansively] What I always say is—

 

HIGGINS [rising and looking at his watch] Ahem!

 

LIZA [looking round at him; taking the hint; and rising] Well: I must go. [They all rise. Freddy goes to the door]. So pleased to have met you. Good-bye. [She shakes hands with Mrs. Higgins].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Good-bye.

 

LIZA. Good-bye, Colonel Pickering.

 

PICKERING. Good-bye, Miss Doolittle. [They shake hands].

 

LIZA [nodding to the others] Good-bye, all.

 

FREDDY [opening the door for her] Are you walking across the Park, Miss Doolittle? If so—

 

LIZA. Walk! Not bloody likely. [Sensation]. I am going in a taxi. [She goes out].

 

Pickering gasps and sits down. Freddy goes out on the balcony to catch another glimpse of Eliza.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [suffering from shock] Well, I really can't get used to the new ways.

 

CLARA [throwing herself discontentedly into the Elizabethan chair]. Oh, it's all right, mamma, quite right. People will think we never go anywhere or see anybody if you are so old-fashioned.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. I daresay I am very old-fashioned; but I do hope you won't begin using that expression, Clara. I have got accustomed to hear you talking about men as rotters, and calling everything filthy and beastly; though I do think it horrible and unladylike. But this last is really too much. Don't you think so, Colonel Pickering?

 

PICKERING. Don't ask me. I've been away in India for several years; and manners have changed so much that I sometimes don't know whether I'm at a respectable dinner-table or in a ship's forecastle.

 

CLARA. It's all a matter of habit. There's no right or wrong in it. Nobody means anything by it. And it's so quaint, and gives such a smart emphasis to things that are not in themselves very witty. I find the new small talk delightful and quite innocent.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [rising] Well, after that, I think it's time for us to go.

 

Pickering and Higgins rise.

 

CLARA [rising] Oh yes: we have three at homes to go to still. Good-bye, Mrs. Higgins. Good-bye, Colonel Pickering. Good-bye, Professor Higgins.

 

HIGGINS [coming grimly at her from the divan, and accompanying her to the door] Good-bye. Be sure you try on that small talk at the three at-homes. Don't be nervous about it. Pitch it in strong.

 

CLARA [all smiles] I will. Good-bye. Such nonsense, all this early Victorian prudery!

 

HIGGINS [tempting her] Such damned nonsense!

 

CLARA. Such bloody nonsense!

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [convulsively] Clara!

 

CLARA. Ha! ha! [She goes out radiant, conscious of being thoroughly up to date, and is heard descending the stairs in a stream of silvery laughter].

 

FREDDY [to the heavens at large] Well, I ask you [He gives it up, and comes to Mrs. Higgins]. Good-bye.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [shaking hands] Good-bye. Would you like to meet Miss Doolittle again?

 

FREDDY [eagerly] Yes, I should, most awfully.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Well, you know my days.

 

FREDDY. Yes. Thanks awfully. Good-bye. [He goes out].

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. Good-bye, Mr. Higgins.

 

HIGGINS. Good-bye. Good-bye.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [to Pickering] It's no use. I shall never be able to bring myself to use that word.

 

PICKERING. Don't. It's not compulsory, you know. You'll get on quite well without it.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. Only, Clara is so down on me if I am not positively reeking with the latest slang. Good-bye.

 

PICKERING. Good-bye [They shake hands].

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL [to Mrs. Higgins] You mustn't mind Clara. [Pickering, catching from her lowered tone that this is not meant for him to hear, discreetly joins Higgins at the window]. We're so poor! and she gets so few parties, poor child! She doesn't quite know. [Mrs. Higgins, seeing that her eyes are moist, takes her hand sympathetically and goes with her to the door]. But the boy is nice. Don't you think so?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Oh, quite nice. I shall always be delighted to see him.

 

MRS. EYNSFORD HILL. Thank you, dear. Good-bye. [She goes out].

 

HIGGINS [eagerly] Well? Is Eliza presentable [he swoops on his mother and drags her to the ottoman, where she sits down in Eliza's place with her son on her left]?

 

Pickering returns to his chair on her right.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. You silly boy, of course she's not presentable. She's a triumph of your art and of her dressmaker's; but if you suppose for a moment that she doesn't give herself away in every sentence she utters, you must be perfectly cracked about her.

 

PICKERING. But don't you think something might be done? I mean something to eliminate the sanguinary element from her conversation.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Not as long as she is in Henry's hands.

 

HIGGINS [aggrieved] Do you mean that my language is improper?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. No, dearest: it would be quite proper—say on a canal barge; but it would not be proper for her at a garden party.

 

HIGGINS [deeply injured] Well I must say—

 

PICKERING [interrupting him] Come, Higgins: you must learn to know yourself. I haven't heard such language as yours since we used to review the volunteers in Hyde Park twenty years ago.

 

HIGGINS [sulkily] Oh, well, if you say so, I suppose I don't always talk like a bishop.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [quieting Henry with a touch] Colonel Pickering: will you tell me what is the exact state of things in Wimpole Street?

 

PICKERING [cheerfully: as if this completely changed the subject] Well, I have come to live there with Henry. We work together at my Indian Dialects; and we think it more convenient—

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Quite so. I know all about that: it's an excellent arrangement. But where does this girl live?

 

HIGGINS. With us, of course. Where would she live?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. But on what terms? Is she a servant? If not, what is she?

 

PICKERING [slowly] I think I know what you mean, Mrs. Higgins.

 

HIGGINS. Well, dash me if I do! I've had to work at the girl every day for months to get her to her present pitch. Besides, she's useful. She knows where my things are, and remembers my appointments and so forth.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. How does your housekeeper get on with her?

 

HIGGINS. Mrs. Pearce? Oh, she's jolly glad to get so much taken off her hands; for before Eliza came, she had to have to find things and remind me of my appointments. But she's got some silly bee in her bonnet about Eliza. She keeps saying "You don't think, sir": doesn't she, Pick?

 

PICKERING. Yes: that's the formula. "You don't think, sir." That's the end of every conversation about Eliza.

 

HIGGINS. As if I ever stop thinking about the girl and her confounded vowels and consonants. I'm worn out, thinking about her, and watching her lips and her teeth and her tongue, not to mention her soul, which is the quaintest of the lot.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. You certainly are a pretty pair of babies, playing with your live doll.

 

HIGGINS. Playing! The hardest job I ever tackled: make no mistake about that, mother. But you have no idea how frightfully interesting it is to take a human being and change her into a quite different human being by creating a new speech for her. It's filling up the deepest gulf that separates class from class and soul from soul.

 

PICKERING [drawing his chair closer to Mrs. Higgins and bending over to her eagerly] Yes: it's enormously interesting. I assure you, Mrs. Higgins, we take Eliza very seriously. Every week—every day almost—there is some new change. [Closer again] We keep records of every stage—dozens of gramophone disks and photographs—

 

HIGGINS [assailing her at the other ear] Yes, by George: it's the most absorbing experiment I ever tackled. She regularly fills our lives up; doesn't she, Pick?

 

PICKERING. We're always talking Eliza.

 

HIGGINS. Teaching Eliza.

 

PICKERING. Dressing Eliza.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. What!

 

HIGGINS. Inventing new Elizas.

 

Higgins and Pickering, speaking together:

 

HIGGINS.       You know, she has the most extraordinary quickness of ear:

PICKERING.   I assure you, my dear Mrs. Higgins, that girl

HIGGINS.       just like a parrot. I've tried her with every

PICKERING.   is a genius. She can play the piano quite beautifully

HIGGINS.       possible sort of sound that a human being can make—

PICKERING.   We have taken her to classical concerts and to music

HIGGINS.       Continental dialects, African dialects, Hottentot

PICKERING.   halls; and it's all the same to her: she plays everything

HIGGINS.       clicks, things it took me years to get hold of; and

PICKERING.   she hears right off when she comes home, whether it's

HIGGINS.       she picks them up like a shot, right away, as if she had

PICKERING.   Beethoven and Brahms or Lehar and Lionel Morickton;

HIGGINS.       been at it all her life.

PICKERING.   though six months ago, she'd never as much as touched a piano.

MRS. HIGGINS [putting her fingers in her ears, as they are by this time shouting one another down with an intolerable noise] Sh—sh—sh—sh! [They stop].

 

PICKERING. I beg your pardon. [He draws his chair back apologetically].

 

HIGGINS. Sorry. When Pickering starts shouting nobody can get a word in edgeways.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Be quiet, Henry. Colonel Pickering: don't you realize that when Eliza walked into Wimpole Street, something walked in with her?

 

PICKERING. Her father did. But Henry soon got rid of him.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. It would have been more to the point if her mother had. But as her mother didn't something else did.

 

PICKERING. But what?

 

MRS. HIGGINS [unconsciously dating herself by the word] A problem.

 

PICKERING. Oh, I see. The problem of how to pass her off as a lady.

 

HIGGINS. I'll solve that problem. I've half solved it already.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. No, you two infinitely stupid male creatures: the problem of what is to be done with her afterwards.

 

HIGGINS. I don't see anything in that. She can go her own way, with all the advantages I have given her.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. The advantages of that poor woman who was here just now! The manners and habits that disqualify a fine lady from earning her own living without giving her a fine lady's income! Is that what you mean?

 

PICKERING [indulgently, being rather bored] Oh, that will be all right, Mrs. Higgins. [He rises to go].

 

HIGGINS [rising also] We'll find her some light employment.

 

PICKERING. She's happy enough. Don't you worry about her. Good-bye. [He shakes hands as if he were consoling a frightened child, and makes for the door].

 

HIGGINS. Anyhow, there's no good bothering now. The thing's done. Good-bye, mother. [He kisses her, and follows Pickering].

 

PICKERING [turning for a final consolation] There are plenty of openings. We'll do what's right. Good-bye.

 

HIGGINS [to Pickering as they go out together] Let's take her to the Shakespear exhibition at Earls Court.

 

PICKERING. Yes: let's. Her remarks will be delicious.

 

HIGGINS. She'll mimic all the people for us when we get home.

 

PICKERING. Ripping. [Both are heard laughing as they go downstairs].

 

MRS. HIGGINS [rises with an impatient bounce, and returns to her work at the writing-table. She sweeps a litter of disarranged papers out of her way; snatches a sheet of paper from her stationery case; and tries resolutely to write. At the third line she gives it up; flings down her pen; grips the table angrily and exclaims] Oh, men! men!! men!!!

 

 

 

 

ACT IV

 

The Wimpole Street laboratory. Midnight. Nobody in the room. The clock on the mantelpiece strikes twelve. The fire is not alight: it is a summer night.

 

Presently Higgins and Pickering are heard on the stairs.

 

HIGGINS [calling down to Pickering] I say, Pick: lock up, will you. I shan't be going out again.

 

PICKERING. Right. Can Mrs. Pearce go to bed? We don't want anything more, do we?

 

HIGGINS. Lord, no!

 

Eliza opens the door and is seen on the lighted landing in opera cloak, brilliant evening dress, and diamonds, with fan, flowers, and all accessories. She comes to the hearth, and switches on the electric lights there. She is tired: her pallor contrasts strongly with her dark eyes and hair; and her expression is almost tragic. She takes off her cloak; puts her fan and flowers on the piano; and sits down on the bench, brooding and silent. Higgins, in evening dress, with overcoat and hat, comes in, carrying a smoking jacket which he has picked up downstairs. He takes off the hat and overcoat; throws them carelessly on the newspaper stand; disposes of his coat in the same way; puts on the smoking jacket; and throws himself wearily into the easy-chair at the hearth. Pickering, similarly attired, comes in. He also takes off his hat and overcoat, and is about to throw them on Higgins's when he hesitates.

 

PICKERING. I say: Mrs. Pearce will row if we leave these things lying about in the drawing-room.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, chuck them over the bannisters into the hall. She'll find them there in the morning and put them away all right. She'll think we were drunk.

 

PICKERING. We are, slightly. Are there any letters?

 

HIGGINS. I didn't look. [Pickering takes the overcoats and hats and goes down stairs. Higgins begins half singing half yawning an air from La Fanciulla del Golden West. Suddenly he stops and exclaims] I wonder where the devil my slippers are!

 

Eliza looks at him darkly; then leaves the room.

 

Higgins yawns again, and resumes his song. Pickering returns, with the contents of the letter-box in his hand.

 

PICKERING. Only circulars, and this coroneted billet-doux for you. [He throws the circulars into the fender, and posts himself on the hearthrug, with his back to the grate].

 

HIGGINS [glancing at the billet-doux] Money-lender. [He throws the letter after the circulars].

 

Eliza returns with a pair of large down-at-heel slippers. She places them on the carpet before Higgins, and sits as before without a word.

 

HIGGINS [yawning again] Oh Lord! What an evening! What a crew! What a silly tomfoollery! [He raises his shoe to unlace it, and catches sight of the slippers. He stops unlacing and looks at them as if they had appeared there of their own accord]. Oh! they're there, are they?

 

PICKERING [stretching himself] Well, I feel a bit tired. It's been a long day. The garden party, a dinner party, and the opera! Rather too much of a good thing. But you've won your bet, Higgins. Eliza did the trick, and something to spare, eh?

 

HIGGINS [fervently] Thank God it's over!

 

Eliza flinches violently; but they take no notice of her; and she recovers herself and sits stonily as before.

 

PICKERING. Were you nervous at the garden party? I was. Eliza didn't seem a bit nervous.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, she wasn't nervous. I knew she'd be all right. No, it's the strain of putting the job through all these months that has told on me. It was interesting enough at first, while we were at the phonetics; but after that I got deadly sick of it. If I hadn't backed myself to do it I should have chucked the whole thing up two months ago. It was a silly notion: the whole thing has been a bore.

 

PICKERING. Oh come! the garden party was frightfully exciting. My heart began beating like anything.

 

HIGGINS. Yes, for the first three minutes. But when I saw we were going to win hands down, I felt like a bear in a cage, hanging about doing nothing. The dinner was worse: sitting gorging there for over an hour, with nobody but a damned fool of a fashionable woman to talk to! I tell you, Pickering, never again for me. No more artificial duchesses. The whole thing has been simple purgatory.

 

PICKERING. You've never been broken in properly to the social routine. [Strolling over to the piano] I rather enjoy dipping into it occasionally myself: it makes me feel young again. Anyhow, it was a great success: an immense success. I was quite frightened once or twice because Eliza was doing it so well. You see, lots of the real people can't do it at all: they're such fools that they think style comes by nature to people in their position; and so they never learn. There's always something professional about doing a thing superlatively well.

 

HIGGINS. Yes: that's what drives me mad: the silly people don't know their own silly business. [Rising] However, it's over and done with; and now I can go to bed at last without dreading tomorrow.

 

Eliza's beauty becomes murderous.

 

PICKERING. I think I shall turn in too. Still, it's been a great occasion: a triumph for you. Good-night. [He goes].

 

HIGGINS [following him] Good-night. [Over his shoulder, at the door] Put out the lights, Eliza; and tell Mrs. Pearce not to make coffee for me in the morning: I'll take tea. [He goes out].

 

Eliza tries to control herself and feel indifferent as she rises and walks across to the hearth to switch off the lights. By the time she gets there she is on the point of screaming. She sits down in Higgins's chair and holds on hard to the arms. Finally she gives way and flings herself furiously on the floor raging.

 

HIGGINS [in despairing wrath outside] What the devil have I done with my slippers? [He appears at the door].

 

LIZA [snatching up the slippers, and hurling them at him one after the other with all her force] There are your slippers. And there. Take your slippers; and may you never have a day's luck with them!

 

HIGGINS [astounded] What on earth—! [He comes to her]. What's the matter? Get up. [He pulls her up]. Anything wrong?

 

LIZA [breathless] Nothing wrong—with YOU. I've won your bet for you, haven't I? That's enough for you. I don't matter, I suppose.

 

HIGGINS. YOU won my bet! You! Presumptuous insect! I won it. What did you throw those slippers at me for?

 

LIZA. Because I wanted to smash your face. I'd like to kill you, you selfish brute. Why didn't you leave me where you picked me out of—in the gutter? You thank God it's all over, and that now you can throw me back again there, do you? [She crisps her fingers, frantically].

 

HIGGINS [looking at her in cool wonder] The creature IS nervous, after all.

 

LIZA [gives a suffocated scream of fury, and instinctively darts her nails at his face]!!

 

HIGGINS [catching her wrists] Ah! would you? Claws in, you cat. How dare you show your temper to me? Sit down and be quiet. [He throws her roughly into the easy-chair].

 

LIZA [crushed by superior strength and weight] What's to become of me? What's to become of me?

 

HIGGINS. How the devil do I know what's to become of you? What does it matter what becomes of you?

 

LIZA. You don't care. I know you don't care. You wouldn't care if I was dead. I'm nothing to you—not so much as them slippers.

 

HIGGINS [thundering] THOSE slippers.

 

LIZA [with bitter submission] Those slippers. I didn't think it made any difference now.

 

A pause. Eliza hopeless and crushed. Higgins a little uneasy.

 

HIGGINS [in his loftiest manner] Why have you begun going on like this? May I ask whether you complain of your treatment here?

 

LIZA. No.

 

HIGGINS. Has anybody behaved badly to you? Colonel Pickering? Mrs. Pearce? Any of the servants?

 

LIZA. No.

 

HIGGINS. I presume you don't pretend that I have treated you badly.

 

LIZA. No.

 

HIGGINS. I am glad to hear it. [He moderates his tone]. Perhaps you're tired after the strain of the day. Will you have a glass of champagne? [He moves towards the door].

 

LIZA. No. [Recollecting her manners] Thank you.

 

HIGGINS [good-humored again] This has been coming on you for some days. I suppose it was natural for you to be anxious about the garden party. But that's all over now. [He pats her kindly on the shoulder. She writhes]. There's nothing more to worry about.

 

LIZA. No. Nothing more for you to worry about. [She suddenly rises and gets away from him by going to the piano bench, where she sits and hides her face]. Oh God! I wish I was dead.

 

HIGGINS [staring after her in sincere surprise] Why? in heaven's name, why? [Reasonably, going to her] Listen to me, Eliza. All this irritation is purely subjective.

 

LIZA. I don't understand. I'm too ignorant.

 

HIGGINS. It's only imagination. Low spirits and nothing else. Nobody's hurting you. Nothing's wrong. You go to bed like a good girl and sleep it off. Have a little cry and say your prayers: that will make you comfortable.

 

LIZA. I heard YOUR prayers. "Thank God it's all over!"

 

HIGGINS [impatiently] Well, don't you thank God it's all over? Now you are free and can do what you like.

 

LIZA [pulling herself together in desperation] What am I fit for? What have you left me fit for? Where am I to go? What am I to do? What's to become of me?

 

HIGGINS [enlightened, but not at all impressed] Oh, that's what's worrying you, is it? [He thrusts his hands into his pockets, and walks about in his usual manner, rattling the contents of his pockets, as if condescending to a trivial subject out of pure kindness]. I shouldn't bother about it if I were you. I should imagine you won't have much difficulty in settling yourself, somewhere or other, though I hadn't quite realized that you were going away. [She looks quickly at him: he does not look at her, but examines the dessert stand on the piano and decides that he will eat an apple]. You might marry, you know. [He bites a large piece out of the apple, and munches it noisily]. You see, Eliza, all men are not confirmed old bachelors like me and the Colonel. Most men are the marrying sort (poor devils!); and you're not bad-looking; it's quite a pleasure to look at you sometimes—not now, of course, because you're crying and looking as ugly as the very devil; but when you're all right and quite yourself, you're what I should call attractive. That is, to the people in the marrying line, you understand. You go to bed and have a good nice rest; and then get up and look at yourself in the glass; and you won't feel so cheap.

 

Eliza again looks at him, speechless, and does not stir.

 

The look is quite lost on him: he eats his apple with a dreamy expression of happiness, as it is quite a good one.

 

HIGGINS [a genial afterthought occurring to him] I daresay my mother could find some chap or other who would do very well—

 

LIZA. We were above that at the corner of Tottenham Court Road.

 

HIGGINS [waking up] What do you mean?

 

LIZA. I sold flowers. I didn't sell myself. Now you've made a lady of me I'm not fit to sell anything else. I wish you'd left me where you found me.

 

HIGGINS [slinging the core of the apple decisively into the grate] Tosh, Eliza. Don't you insult human relations by dragging all this cant about buying and selling into it. You needn't marry the fellow if you don't like him.

 

LIZA. What else am I to do?

 

HIGGINS. Oh, lots of things. What about your old idea of a florist's shop? Pickering could set you up in one: he's lots of money. [Chuckling] He'll have to pay for all those togs you have been wearing today; and that, with the hire of the jewellery, will make a big hole in two hundred pounds. Why, six months ago you would have thought it the millennium to have a flower shop of your own. Come! you'll be all right. I must clear off to bed: I'm devilish sleepy. By the way, I came down for something: I forget what it was.

 

LIZA. Your slippers.

 

HIGGINS. Oh yes, of course. You shied them at me. [He picks them up, and is going out when she rises and speaks to him].

 

LIZA. Before you go, sir—

 

HIGGINS [dropping the slippers in his surprise at her calling him sir] Eh?

 

LIZA. Do my clothes belong to me or to Colonel Pickering?

 

HIGGINS [coming back into the room as if her question were the very climax of unreason] What the devil use would they be to Pickering?

 

LIZA. He might want them for the next girl you pick up to experiment on.

 

HIGGINS [shocked and hurt] Is THAT the way you feel towards us?

 

LIZA. I don't want to hear anything more about that. All I want to know is whether anything belongs to me. My own clothes were burnt.

 

HIGGINS. But what does it matter? Why need you start bothering about that in the middle of the night?

 

LIZA. I want to know what I may take away with me. I don't want to be accused of stealing.

 

HIGGINS [now deeply wounded] Stealing! You shouldn't have said that, Eliza. That shows a want of feeling.

 

LIZA. I'm sorry. I'm only a common ignorant girl; and in my station I have to be careful. There can't be any feelings between the like of you and the like of me. Please will you tell me what belongs to me and what doesn't?

 

HIGGINS [very sulky] You may take the whole damned houseful if you like. Except the jewels. They're hired. Will that satisfy you? [He turns on his heel and is about to go in extreme dudgeon].

 

LIZA [drinking in his emotion like nectar, and nagging him to provoke a further supply] Stop, please. [She takes off her jewels]. Will you take these to your room and keep them safe? I don't want to run the risk of their being missing.

 

HIGGINS [furious] Hand them over. [She puts them into his hands]. If these belonged to me instead of to the jeweler, I'd ram them down your ungrateful throat. [He perfunctorily thrusts them into his pockets, unconsciously decorating himself with the protruding ends of the chains].

 

LIZA [taking a ring off] This ring isn't the jeweler's: it's the one you bought me in Brighton. I don't want it now. [Higgins dashes the ring violently into the fireplace, and turns on her so threateningly that she crouches over the piano with her hands over her face, and exclaims] Don't you hit me.

 

HIGGINS. Hit you! You infamous creature, how dare you accuse me of such a thing? It is you who have hit me. You have wounded me to the heart.

 

LIZA [thrilling with hidden joy] I'm glad. I've got a little of my own back, anyhow.

 

HIGGINS [with dignity, in his finest professional style] You have caused me to lose my temper: a thing that has hardly ever happened to me before. I prefer to say nothing more tonight. I am going to bed.

 

LIZA [pertly] You'd better leave a note for Mrs. Pearce about the coffee; for she won't be told by me.

 

HIGGINS [formally] Damn Mrs. Pearce; and damn the coffee; and damn you; and damn my own folly in having lavished MY hard-earned knowledge and the treasure of my regard and intimacy on a heartless guttersnipe. [He goes out with impressive decorum, and spoils it by slamming the door savagely].

 

Eliza smiles for the first time; expresses her feelings by a wild pantomime in which an imitation of Higgins's exit is confused with her own triumph; and finally goes down on her knees on the hearthrug to look for the ring.

 

 

 

 

ACT V

 

Mrs. Higgins's drawing-room. She is at her writing-table as before. The parlor-maid comes in.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID [at the door] Mr. Henry, mam, is downstairs with Colonel Pickering.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Well, show them up.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. They're using the telephone, mam. Telephoning to the police, I think.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. What!

 

THE PARLOR-MAID [coming further in and lowering her voice] Mr. Henry's in a state, mam. I thought I'd better tell you.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. If you had told me that Mr. Henry was not in a state it would have been more surprising. Tell them to come up when they've finished with the police. I suppose he's lost something.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Yes, mam [going].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Go upstairs and tell Miss Doolittle that Mr. Henry and the Colonel are here. Ask her not to come down till I send for her.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Yes, mam.

 

Higgins bursts in. He is, as the parlor-maid has said, in a state.

 

HIGGINS. Look here, mother: here's a confounded thing!

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Yes, dear. Good-morning. [He checks his impatience and kisses her, whilst the parlor-maid goes out]. What is it?

 

HIGGINS. Eliza's bolted.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [calmly continuing her writing] You must have frightened her.

 

HIGGINS. Frightened her! nonsense! She was left last night, as usual, to turn out the lights and all that; and instead of going to bed she changed her clothes and went right off: her bed wasn't slept in. She came in a cab for her things before seven this morning; and that fool Mrs. Pearce let her have them without telling me a word about it. What am I to do?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Do without, I'm afraid, Henry. The girl has a perfect right to leave if she chooses.

 

HIGGINS [wandering distractedly across the room] But I can't find anything. I don't know what appointments I've got. I'm— [Pickering comes in. Mrs. Higgins puts down her pen and turns away from the writing-table].

 

PICKERING [shaking hands] Good-morning, Mrs. Higgins. Has Henry told you? [He sits down on the ottoman].

 

HIGGINS. What does that ass of an inspector say? Have you offered a reward?

 

MRS. HIGGINS [rising in indignant amazement] You don't mean to say you have set the police after Eliza?

 

HIGGINS. Of course. What are the police for? What else could we do? [He sits in the Elizabethan chair].

 

PICKERING. The inspector made a lot of difficulties. I really think he suspected us of some improper purpose.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Well, of course he did. What right have you to go to the police and give the girl's name as if she were a thief, or a lost umbrella, or something? Really! [She sits down again, deeply vexed].

 

HIGGINS. But we want to find her.

 

PICKERING. We can't let her go like this, you know, Mrs. Higgins. What were we to do?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. You have no more sense, either of you, than two children. Why—

 

The parlor-maid comes in and breaks off the conversation.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Mr. Henry: a gentleman wants to see you very particular. He's been sent on from Wimpole Street.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, bother! I can't see anyone now. Who is it?

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. A Mr. Doolittle, Sir.

 

PICKERING. Doolittle! Do you mean the dustman?

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Dustman! Oh no, sir: a gentleman.

 

HIGGINS [springing up excitedly] By George, Pick, it's some relative of hers that she's gone to. Somebody we know nothing about. [To the parlor-maid] Send him up, quick.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Yes, Sir. [She goes].

 

HIGGINS [eagerly, going to his mother] Genteel relatives! now we shall hear something. [He sits down in the Chippendale chair].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Do you know any of her people?

 

PICKERING. Only her father: the fellow we told you about.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID [announcing] Mr. Doolittle. [She withdraws].

 

Doolittle enters. He is brilliantly dressed in a new fashionable frock-coat, with white waistcoat and grey trousers. A flower in his buttonhole, a dazzling silk hat, and patent leather shoes complete the effect. He is too concerned with the business he has come on to notice Mrs. Higgins. He walks straight to Higgins, and accosts him with vehement reproach.

 

DOOLITTLE [indicating his own person] See here! Do you see this? You done this.

 

HIGGINS. Done what, man?

 

DOOLITTLE. This, I tell you. Look at it. Look at this hat. Look at this coat.

 

PICKERING. Has Eliza been buying you clothes?

 

DOOLITTLE. Eliza! not she. Not half. Why would she buy me clothes?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Good-morning, Mr. Doolittle. Won't you sit down?

 

DOOLITTLE [taken aback as he becomes conscious that he has forgotten his hostess] Asking your pardon, ma'am. [He approaches her and shakes her proffered hand]. Thank you. [He sits down on the ottoman, on Pickering's right]. I am that full of what has happened to me that I can't think of anything else.

 

HIGGINS. What the dickens has happened to you?

 

DOOLITTLE. I shouldn't mind if it had only happened to me: anything might happen to anybody and nobody to blame but Providence, as you might say. But this is something that you done to me: yes, you, Henry Higgins.

 

HIGGINS. Have you found Eliza? That's the point.

 

DOOLITTLE. Have you lost her?

 

HIGGINS. Yes.

 

DOOLITTLE. You have all the luck, you have. I ain't found her; but she'll find me quick enough now after what you done to me.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. But what has my son done to you, Mr. Doolittle?

 

DOOLITTLE. Done to me! Ruined me. Destroyed my happiness. Tied me up and delivered me into the hands of middle class morality.

 

HIGGINS [rising intolerantly and standing over Doolittle] You're raving. You're drunk. You're mad. I gave you five pounds. After that I had two conversations with you, at half-a-crown an hour. I've never seen you since.

 

DOOLITTLE. Oh! Drunk! am I? Mad! am I? Tell me this. Did you or did you not write a letter to an old blighter in America that was giving five millions to found Moral Reform Societies all over the world, and that wanted you to invent a universal language for him?

 

HIGGINS. What! Ezra D. Wannafeller! He's dead. [He sits down again carelessly].

 

DOOLITTLE. Yes: he's dead; and I'm done for. Now did you or did you not write a letter to him to say that the most original moralist at present in England, to the best of your knowledge, was Alfred Doolittle, a common dustman.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, after your last visit I remember making some silly joke of the kind.

 

DOOLITTLE. Ah! you may well call it a silly joke. It put the lid on me right enough. Just give him the chance he wanted to show that Americans is not like us: that they recognize and respect merit in every class of life, however humble. Them words is in his blooming will, in which, Henry Higgins, thanks to your silly joking, he leaves me a share in his Pre-digested Cheese Trust worth three thousand a year on condition that I lecture for his Wannafeller Moral Reform World League as often as they ask me up to six times a year.

 

HIGGINS. The devil he does! Whew! [Brightening suddenly] What a lark!

 

PICKERING. A safe thing for you, Doolittle. They won't ask you twice.

 

DOOLITTLE. It ain't the lecturing I mind. I'll lecture them blue in the face, I will, and not turn a hair. It's making a gentleman of me that I object to. Who asked him to make a gentleman of me? I was happy. I was free. I touched pretty nigh everybody for money when I wanted it, same as I touched you, Henry Higgins. Now I am worrited; tied neck and heels; and everybody touches me for money. It's a fine thing for you, says my solicitor. Is it? says I. You mean it's a good thing for you, I says. When I was a poor man and had a solicitor once when they found a pram in the dust cart, he got me off, and got shut of me and got me shut of him as quick as he could. Same with the doctors: used to shove me out of the hospital before I could hardly stand on my legs, and nothing to pay. Now they finds out that I'm not a healthy man and can't live unless they looks after me twice a day. In the house I'm not let do a hand's turn for myself: somebody else must do it and touch me for it. A year ago I hadn't a relative in the world except two or three that wouldn't speak to me. Now I've fifty, and not a decent week's wages among the lot of them. I have to live for others and not for myself: that's middle class morality. You talk of losing Eliza. Don't you be anxious: I bet she's on my doorstep by this: she that could support herself easy by selling flowers if I wasn't respectable. And the next one to touch me will be you, Henry Higgins. I'll have to learn to speak middle class language from you, instead of speaking proper English. That's where you'll come in; and I daresay that's what you done it for.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. But, my dear Mr. Doolittle, you need not suffer all this if you are really in earnest. Nobody can force you to accept this bequest. You can repudiate it. Isn't that so, Colonel Pickering?

 

PICKERING. I believe so.

 

DOOLITTLE [softening his manner in deference to her sex] That's the tragedy of it, ma'am. It's easy to say chuck it; but I haven't the nerve. Which one of us has? We're all intimidated. Intimidated, ma'am: that's what we are. What is there for me if I chuck it but the workhouse in my old age? I have to dye my hair already to keep my job as a dustman. If I was one of the deserving poor, and had put by a bit, I could chuck it; but then why should I, acause the deserving poor might as well be millionaires for all the happiness they ever has. They don't know what happiness is. But I, as one of the undeserving poor, have nothing between me and the pauper's uniform but this here blasted three thousand a year that shoves me into the middle class. (Excuse the expression, ma'am: you'd use it yourself if you had my provocation). They've got you every way you turn: it's a choice between the Skilly of the workhouse and the Char Bydis of the middle class; and I haven't the nerve for the workhouse. Intimidated: that's what I am. Broke. Bought up. Happier men than me will call for my dust, and touch me for their tip; and I'll look on helpless, and envy them. And that's what your son has brought me to. [He is overcome by emotion].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Well, I'm very glad you're not going to do anything foolish, Mr. Doolittle. For this solves the problem of Eliza's future. You can provide for her now.

 

DOOLITTLE [with melancholy resignation] Yes, ma'am; I'm expected to provide for everyone now, out of three thousand a year.

 

HIGGINS [jumping up] Nonsense! he can't provide for her. He shan't provide for her. She doesn't belong to him. I paid him five pounds for her. Doolittle: either you're an honest man or a rogue.

 

DOOLITTLE [tolerantly] A little of both, Henry, like the rest of us: a little of both.

 

HIGGINS. Well, you took that money for the girl; and you have no right to take her as well.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Henry: don't be absurd. If you really want to know where Eliza is, she is upstairs.

 

HIGGINS [amazed] Upstairs!!! Then I shall jolly soon fetch her downstairs. [He makes resolutely for the door].

 

MRS. HIGGINS [rising and following him] Be quiet, Henry. Sit down.

 

HIGGINS. I—

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Sit down, dear; and listen to me.

 

HIGGINS. Oh very well, very well, very well. [He throws himself ungraciously on the ottoman, with his face towards the windows]. But I think you might have told me this half an hour ago.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Eliza came to me this morning. She passed the night partly walking about in a rage, partly trying to throw herself into the river and being afraid to, and partly in the Carlton Hotel. She told me of the brutal way you two treated her.

 

HIGGINS [bounding up again] What!

 

PICKERING [rising also] My dear Mrs. Higgins, she's been telling you stories. We didn't treat her brutally. We hardly said a word to her; and we parted on particularly good terms. [Turning on Higgins]. Higgins did you bully her after I went to bed?

 

HIGGINS. Just the other way about. She threw my slippers in my face. She behaved in the most outrageous way. I never gave her the slightest provocation. The slippers came bang into my face the moment I entered the room—before I had uttered a word. And used perfectly awful language.

 

PICKERING [astonished] But why? What did we do to her?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. I think I know pretty well what you did. The girl is naturally rather affectionate, I think. Isn't she, Mr. Doolittle?

 

DOOLITTLE. Very tender-hearted, ma'am. Takes after me.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Just so. She had become attached to you both. She worked very hard for you, Henry! I don't think you quite realize what anything in the nature of brain work means to a girl like that. Well, it seems that when the great day of trial came, and she did this wonderful thing for you without making a single mistake, you two sat there and never said a word to her, but talked together of how glad you were that it was all over and how you had been bored with the whole thing. And then you were surprised because she threw your slippers at you! I should have thrown the fire-irons at you.

 

HIGGINS. We said nothing except that we were tired and wanted to go to bed. Did we, Pick?

 

PICKERING [shrugging his shoulders] That was all.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [ironically] Quite sure?

 

PICKERING. Absolutely. Really, that was all.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. You didn't thank her, or pet her, or admire her, or tell her how splendid she'd been.

 

HIGGINS [impatiently] But she knew all about that. We didn't make speeches to her, if that's what you mean.

 

PICKERING [conscience stricken] Perhaps we were a little inconsiderate. Is she very angry?

 

MRS. HIGGINS [returning to her place at the writing-table] Well, I'm afraid she won't go back to Wimpole Street, especially now that Mr. Doolittle is able to keep up the position you have thrust on her; but she says she is quite willing to meet you on friendly terms and to let bygones be bygones.

 

HIGGINS [furious] Is she, by George? Ho!

 

MRS. HIGGINS. If you promise to behave yourself, Henry, I'll ask her to come down. If not, go home; for you have taken up quite enough of my time.

 

HIGGINS. Oh, all right. Very well. Pick: you behave yourself. Let us put on our best Sunday manners for this creature that we picked out of the mud. [He flings himself sulkily into the Elizabethan chair].

 

DOOLITTLE [remonstrating] Now, now, Henry Higgins! have some consideration for my feelings as a middle class man.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Remember your promise, Henry. [She presses the bell-button on the writing-table]. Mr. Doolittle: will you be so good as to step out on the balcony for a moment. I don't want Eliza to have the shock of your news until she has made it up with these two gentlemen. Would you mind?

 

DOOLITTLE. As you wish, lady. Anything to help Henry to keep her off my hands. [He disappears through the window].

 

The parlor-maid answers the bell. Pickering sits down in Doolittle's place.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Ask Miss Doolittle to come down, please.

 

THE PARLOR-MAID. Yes, mam. [She goes out].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Now, Henry: be good.

 

HIGGINS. I am behaving myself perfectly.

 

PICKERING. He is doing his best, Mrs. Higgins.

 

A pause. Higgins throws back his head; stretches out his legs; and begins to whistle.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Henry, dearest, you don't look at all nice in that attitude.

 

HIGGINS [pulling himself together] I was not trying to look nice, mother.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. It doesn't matter, dear. I only wanted to make you speak.

 

HIGGINS. Why?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Because you can't speak and whistle at the same time.

 

Higgins groans. Another very trying pause.

 

HIGGINS [springing up, out of patience] Where the devil is that girl? Are we to wait here all day?

 

Eliza enters, sunny, self-possessed, and giving a staggeringly convincing exhibition of ease of manner. She carries a little work-basket, and is very much at home. Pickering is too much taken aback to rise.

 

LIZA. How do you do, Professor Higgins? Are you quite well?

 

HIGGINS [choking] Am I— [He can say no more].

 

LIZA. But of course you are: you are never ill. So glad to see you again, Colonel Pickering. [He rises hastily; and they shake hands]. Quite chilly this morning, isn't it? [She sits down on his left. He sits beside her].

 

HIGGINS. Don't you dare try this game on me. I taught it to you; and it doesn't take me in. Get up and come home; and don't be a fool.

 

Eliza takes a piece of needlework from her basket, and begins to stitch at it, without taking the least notice of this outburst.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Very nicely put, indeed, Henry. No woman could resist such an invitation.

 

HIGGINS. You let her alone, mother. Let her speak for herself. You will jolly soon see whether she has an idea that I haven't put into her head or a word that I haven't put into her mouth. I tell you I have created this thing out of the squashed cabbage leaves of Covent Garden; and now she pretends to play the fine lady with me.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [placidly] Yes, dear; but you'll sit down, won't you?

 

Higgins sits down again, savagely.

 

LIZA [to Pickering, taking no apparent notice of Higgins, and working away deftly] Will you drop me altogether now that the experiment is over, Colonel Pickering?

 

PICKERING. Oh don't. You mustn't think of it as an experiment. It shocks me, somehow.

 

LIZA. Oh, I'm only a squashed cabbage leaf.

 

PICKERING [impulsively] No.

 

LIZA [continuing quietly]—but I owe so much to you that I should be very unhappy if you forgot me.

 

PICKERING. It's very kind of you to say so, Miss Doolittle.

 

LIZA. It's not because you paid for my dresses. I know you are generous to everybody with money. But it was from you that I learnt really nice manners; and that is what makes one a lady, isn't it? You see it was so very difficult for me with the example of Professor Higgins always before me. I was brought up to be just like him, unable to control myself, and using bad language on the slightest provocation. And I should never have known that ladies and gentlemen didn't behave like that if you hadn't been there.

 

HIGGINS. Well!!

 

PICKERING. Oh, that's only his way, you know. He doesn't mean it.

 

LIZA. Oh, I didn't mean it either, when I was a flower girl. It was only my way. But you see I did it; and that's what makes the difference after all.

 

PICKERING. No doubt. Still, he taught you to speak; and I couldn't have done that, you know.

 

LIZA [trivially] Of course: that is his profession.

 

HIGGINS. Damnation!

 

LIZA [continuing] It was just like learning to dance in the fashionable way: there was nothing more than that in it. But do you know what began my real education?

 

PICKERING. What?

 

LIZA [stopping her work for a moment] Your calling me Miss Doolittle that day when I first came to Wimpole Street. That was the beginning of self-respect for me. [She resumes her stitching]. And there were a hundred little things you never noticed, because they came naturally to you. Things about standing up and taking off your hat and opening doors—

 

PICKERING. Oh, that was nothing.

 

LIZA. Yes: things that showed you thought and felt about me as if I were something better than a scullerymaid; though of course I know you would have been just the same to a scullery-maid if she had been let in the drawing-room. You never took off your boots in the dining room when I was there.

 

PICKERING. You mustn't mind that. Higgins takes off his boots all over the place.

 

LIZA. I know. I am not blaming him. It is his way, isn't it? But it made such a difference to me that you didn't do it. You see, really and truly, apart from the things anyone can pick up (the dressing and the proper way of speaking, and so on), the difference between a lady and a flower girl is not how she behaves, but how she's treated. I shall always be a flower girl to Professor Higgins, because he always treats me as a flower girl, and always will; but I know I can be a lady to you, because you always treat me as a lady, and always will.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Please don't grind your teeth, Henry.

 

PICKERING. Well, this is really very nice of you, Miss Doolittle.

 

LIZA. I should like you to call me Eliza, now, if you would.

 

PICKERING. Thank you. Eliza, of course.

 

LIZA. And I should like Professor Higgins to call me Miss Doolittle.

 

HIGGINS. I'll see you damned first.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Henry! Henry!

 

PICKERING [laughing] Why don't you slang back at him? Don't stand it. It would do him a lot of good.

 

LIZA. I can't. I could have done it once; but now I can't go back to it. Last night, when I was wandering about, a girl spoke to me; and I tried to get back into the old way with her; but it was no use. You told me, you know, that when a child is brought to a foreign country, it picks up the language in a few weeks, and forgets its own. Well, I am a child in your country. I have forgotten my own language, and can speak nothing but yours. That's the real break-off with the corner of Tottenham Court Road. Leaving Wimpole Street finishes it.

 

PICKERING [much alarmed] Oh! but you're coming back to Wimpole Street, aren't you? You'll forgive Higgins?

 

HIGGINS [rising] Forgive! Will she, by George! Let her go. Let her find out how she can get on without us. She will relapse into the gutter in three weeks without me at her elbow.

 

Doolittle appears at the centre window. With a look of dignified reproach at Higgins, he comes slowly and silently to his daughter, who, with her back to the window, is unconscious of his approach.

 

PICKERING. He's incorrigible, Eliza. You won't relapse, will you?

 

LIZA. No: Not now. Never again. I have learnt my lesson. I don't believe I could utter one of the old sounds if I tried. [Doolittle touches her on her left shoulder. She drops her work, losing her self-possession utterly at the spectacle of her father's splendor] A—a—a—a—a—ah—ow—ooh!

 

HIGGINS [with a crow of triumph] Aha! Just so. A—a—a—a—ahowooh! A—a—a—a—ahowooh ! A—a—a—a—ahowooh! Victory! Victory! [He throws himself on the divan, folding his arms, and spraddling arrogantly].

 

DOOLITTLE. Can you blame the girl? Don't look at me like that, Eliza. It ain't my fault. I've come into money.

 

LIZA. You must have touched a millionaire this time, dad.

 

DOOLITTLE. I have. But I'm dressed something special today. I'm going to St. George's, Hanover Square. Your stepmother is going to marry me.

 

LIZA [angrily] You're going to let yourself down to marry that low common woman!

 

PICKERING [quietly] He ought to, Eliza. [To Doolittle] Why has she changed her mind?

 

DOOLITTLE [sadly] Intimidated, Governor. Intimidated. Middle class morality claims its victim. Won't you put on your hat, Liza, and come and see me turned off?

 

LIZA. If the Colonel says I must, I—I'll [almost sobbing] I'll demean myself. And get insulted for my pains, like enough.

 

DOOLITTLE. Don't be afraid: she never comes to words with anyone now, poor woman! respectability has broke all the spirit out of her.

 

PICKERING [squeezing Eliza's elbow gently] Be kind to them, Eliza. Make the best of it.

 

LIZA [forcing a little smile for him through her vexation] Oh well, just to show there's no ill feeling. I'll be back in a moment. [She goes out].

 

DOOLITTLE [sitting down beside Pickering] I feel uncommon nervous about the ceremony, Colonel. I wish you'd come and see me through it.

 

PICKERING. But you've been through it before, man. You were married to Eliza's mother.

 

DOOLITTLE. Who told you that, Colonel?

 

PICKERING. Well, nobody told me. But I concluded naturally—

 

DOOLITTLE. No: that ain't the natural way, Colonel: it's only the middle class way. My way was always the undeserving way. But don't say nothing to Eliza. She don't know: I always had a delicacy about telling her.

 

PICKERING. Quite right. We'll leave it so, if you don't mind.

 

DOOLITTLE. And you'll come to the church, Colonel, and put me through straight?

 

PICKERING. With pleasure. As far as a bachelor can.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. May I come, Mr. Doolittle? I should be very sorry to miss your wedding.

 

DOOLITTLE. I should indeed be honored by your condescension, ma'am; and my poor old woman would take it as a tremenjous compliment. She's been very low, thinking of the happy days that are no more.

 

MRS. HIGGINS [rising] I'll order the carriage and get ready. [The men rise, except Higgins]. I shan't be more than fifteen minutes. [As she goes to the door Eliza comes in, hatted and buttoning her gloves]. I'm going to the church to see your father married, Eliza. You had better come in the brougham with me. Colonel Pickering can go on with the bridegroom.

 

Mrs. Higgins goes out. Eliza comes to the middle of the room between the centre window and the ottoman. Pickering joins her.

 

DOOLITTLE. Bridegroom! What a word! It makes a man realize his position, somehow. [He takes up his hat and goes towards the door].

 

PICKERING. Before I go, Eliza, do forgive him and come back to us.

 

LIZA. I don't think papa would allow me. Would you, dad?

 

DOOLITTLE [sad but magnanimous] They played you off very cunning, Eliza, them two sportsmen. If it had been only one of them, you could have nailed him. But you see, there was two; and one of them chaperoned the other, as you might say. [To Pickering] It was artful of you, Colonel; but I bear no malice: I should have done the same myself. I been the victim of one woman after another all my life; and I don't grudge you two getting the better of Eliza. I shan't interfere. It's time for us to go, Colonel. So long, Henry. See you in St. George's, Eliza. [He goes out].

 

PICKERING [coaxing] Do stay with us, Eliza. [He follows Doolittle].

 

Eliza goes out on the balcony to avoid being alone with Higgins. He rises and joins her there. She immediately comes back into the room and makes for the door; but he goes along the balcony quickly and gets his back to the door before she reaches it.

 

HIGGINS. Well, Eliza, you've had a bit of your own back, as you call it. Have you had enough? and are you going to be reasonable? Or do you want any more?

 

LIZA. You want me back only to pick up your slippers and put up with your tempers and fetch and carry for you.

 

HIGGINS. I haven't said I wanted you back at all.

 

LIZA. Oh, indeed. Then what are we talking about?

 

HIGGINS. About you, not about me. If you come back I shall treat you just as I have always treated you. I can't change my nature; and I don't intend to change my manners. My manners are exactly the same as Colonel Pickering's.

 

LIZA. That's not true. He treats a flower girl as if she was a duchess.

 

HIGGINS. And I treat a duchess as if she was a flower girl.

 

LIZA. I see. [She turns away composedly, and sits on the ottoman, facing the window]. The same to everybody.

 

HIGGINS. Just so.

 

LIZA. Like father.

 

HIGGINS [grinning, a little taken down] Without accepting the comparison at all points, Eliza, it's quite true that your father is not a snob, and that he will be quite at home in any station of life to which his eccentric destiny may call him. [Seriously] The great secret, Eliza, is not having bad manners or good manners or any other particular sort of manners, but having the same manner for all human souls: in short, behaving as if you were in Heaven, where there are no third-class carriages, and one soul is as good as another.

 

LIZA. Amen. You are a born preacher.

 

HIGGINS [irritated] The question is not whether I treat you rudely, but whether you ever heard me treat anyone else better.

 

LIZA [with sudden sincerity] I don't care how you treat me. I don't mind your swearing at me. I don't mind a black eye: I've had one before this. But [standing up and facing him] I won't be passed over.

 

HIGGINS. Then get out of my way; for I won't stop for you. You talk about me as if I were a motor bus.

 

LIZA. So you are a motor bus: all bounce and go, and no consideration for anyone. But I can do without you: don't think I can't.

 

HIGGINS. I know you can. I told you you could.

 

LIZA [wounded, getting away from him to the other side of the ottoman with her face to the hearth] I know you did, you brute. You wanted to get rid of me.

 

HIGGINS. Liar.

 

LIZA. Thank you. [She sits down with dignity].

 

HIGGINS. You never asked yourself, I suppose, whether I could do without YOU.

 

LIZA [earnestly] Don't you try to get round me. You'll HAVE to do without me.

 

HIGGINS [arrogant] I can do without anybody. I have my own soul: my own spark of divine fire. But [with sudden humility] I shall miss you, Eliza. [He sits down near her on the ottoman]. I have learnt something from your idiotic notions: I confess that humbly and gratefully. And I have grown accustomed to your voice and appearance. I like them, rather.

 

LIZA. Well, you have both of them on your gramophone and in your book of photographs. When you feel lonely without me, you can turn the machine on. It's got no feelings to hurt.

 

HIGGINS. I can't turn your soul on. Leave me those feelings; and you can take away the voice and the face. They are not you.

 

LIZA. Oh, you ARE a devil. You can twist the heart in a girl as easy as some could twist her arms to hurt her. Mrs. Pearce warned me. Time and again she has wanted to leave you; and you always got round her at the last minute. And you don't care a bit for her. And you don't care a bit for me.

 

HIGGINS. I care for life, for humanity; and you are a part of it that has come my way and been built into my house. What more can you or anyone ask?

 

LIZA. I won't care for anybody that doesn't care for me.

 

HIGGINS. Commercial principles, Eliza. Like [reproducing her Covent Garden pronunciation with professional exactness] s'yollin voylets [selling violets], isn't it?

 

LIZA. Don't sneer at me. It's mean to sneer at me.

 

HIGGINS. I have never sneered in my life. Sneering doesn't become either the human face or the human soul. I am expressing my righteous contempt for Commercialism. I don't and won't trade in affection. You call me a brute because you couldn't buy a claim on me by fetching my slippers and finding my spectacles. You were a fool: I think a woman fetching a man's slippers is a disgusting sight: did I ever fetch YOUR slippers? I think a good deal more of you for throwing them in my face. No use slaving for me and then saying you want to be cared for: who cares for a slave? If you come back, come back for the sake of good fellowship; for you'll get nothing else. You've had a thousand times as much out of me as I have out of you; and if you dare to set up your little dog's tricks of fetching and carrying slippers against my creation of a Duchess Eliza, I'll slam the door in your silly face.

 

LIZA. What did you do it for if you didn't care for me?

 

HIGGINS [heartily] Why, because it was my job.

 

LIZA. You never thought of the trouble it would make for me.

 

HIGGINS. Would the world ever have been made if its maker had been afraid of making trouble? Making life means making trouble. There's only one way of escaping trouble; and that's killing things. Cowards, you notice, are always shrieking to have troublesome people killed.

 

LIZA. I'm no preacher: I don't notice things like that. I notice that you don't notice me.

 

HIGGINS [jumping up and walking about intolerantly] Eliza: you're an idiot. I waste the treasures of my Miltonic mind by spreading them before you. Once for all, understand that I go my way and do my work without caring twopence what happens to either of us. I am not intimidated, like your father and your stepmother. So you can come back or go to the devil: which you please.

 

LIZA. What am I to come back for?

 

HIGGINS [bouncing up on his knees on the ottoman and leaning over it to her] For the fun of it. That's why I took you on.

 

LIZA [with averted face] And you may throw me out tomorrow if I don't do everything you want me to?

 

HIGGINS. Yes; and you may walk out tomorrow if I don't do everything YOU want me to.

 

LIZA. And live with my stepmother?

 

HIGGINS. Yes, or sell flowers.

 

LIZA. Oh! if I only COULD go back to my flower basket! I should be independent of both you and father and all the world! Why did you take my independence from me? Why did I give it up? I'm a slave now, for all my fine clothes.

 

HIGGINS. Not a bit. I'll adopt you as my daughter and settle money on you if you like. Or would you rather marry Pickering?

 

LIZA [looking fiercely round at him] I wouldn't marry YOU if you asked me; and you're nearer my age than what he is.

 

HIGGINS [gently] Than he is: not "than what he is."

 

LIZA [losing her temper and rising] I'll talk as I like. You're not my teacher now.

 

HIGGINS [reflectively] I don't suppose Pickering would, though. He's as confirmed an old bachelor as I am.

 

LIZA. That's not what I want; and don't you think it. I've always had chaps enough wanting me that way. Freddy Hill writes to me twice and three times a day, sheets and sheets.

 

HIGGINS [disagreeably surprised] Damn his impudence! [He recoils and finds himself sitting on his heels].

 

LIZA. He has a right to if he likes, poor lad. And he does love me.

 

HIGGINS [getting off the ottoman] You have no right to encourage him.

 

LIZA. Every girl has a right to be loved.

 

HIGGINS. What! By fools like that?

 

LIZA. Freddy's not a fool. And if he's weak and poor and wants me, may be he'd make me happier than my betters that bully me and don't want me.

 

HIGGINS. Can he MAKE anything of you? That's the point.

 

LIZA. Perhaps I could make something of him. But I never thought of us making anything of one another; and you never think of anything else. I only want to be natural.

 

HIGGINS. In short, you want me to be as infatuated about you as Freddy? Is that it?

 

LIZA. No I don't. That's not the sort of feeling I want from you. And don't you be too sure of yourself or of me. I could have been a bad girl if I'd liked. I've seen more of some things than you, for all your learning. Girls like me can drag gentlemen down to make love to them easy enough. And they wish each other dead the next minute.

 

HIGGINS. Of course they do. Then what in thunder are we quarrelling about?

 

LIZA [much troubled] I want a little kindness. I know I'm a common ignorant girl, and you a book-learned gentleman; but I'm not dirt under your feet. What I done [correcting herself] what I did was not for the dresses and the taxis: I did it because we were pleasant together and I come—came—to care for you; not to want you to make love to me, and not forgetting the difference between us, but more friendly like.

 

HIGGINS. Well, of course. That's just how I feel. And how Pickering feels. Eliza: you're a fool.

 

LIZA. That's not a proper answer to give me [she sinks on the chair at the writing-table in tears].

 

HIGGINS. It's all you'll get until you stop being a common idiot. If you're going to be a lady, you'll have to give up feeling neglected if the men you know don't spend half their time snivelling over you and the other half giving you black eyes. If you can't stand the coldness of my sort of life, and the strain of it, go back to the gutter. Work til you are more a brute than a human being; and then cuddle and squabble and drink til you fall asleep. Oh, it's a fine life, the life of the gutter. It's real: it's warm: it's violent: you can feel it through the thickest skin: you can taste it and smell it without any training or any work. Not like Science and Literature and Classical Music and Philosophy and Art. You find me cold, unfeeling, selfish, don't you? Very well: be off with you to the sort of people you like. Marry some sentimental hog or other with lots of money, and a thick pair of lips to kiss you with and a thick pair of boots to kick you with. If you can't appreciate what you've got, you'd better get what you can appreciate.

 

LIZA [desperate] Oh, you are a cruel tyrant. I can't talk to you: you turn everything against me: I'm always in the wrong. But you know very well all the time that you're nothing but a bully. You know I can't go back to the gutter, as you call it, and that I have no real friends in the world but you and the Colonel. You know well I couldn't bear to live with a low common man after you two; and it's wicked and cruel of you to insult me by pretending I could. You think I must go back to Wimpole Street because I have nowhere else to go but father's. But don't you be too sure that you have me under your feet to be trampled on and talked down. I'll marry Freddy, I will, as soon as he's able to support me.

 

HIGGINS [sitting down beside her] Rubbish! you shall marry an ambassador. You shall marry the Governor-General of India or the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, or somebody who wants a deputy-queen. I'm not going to have my masterpiece thrown away on Freddy.

 

LIZA. You think I like you to say that. But I haven't forgot what you said a minute ago; and I won't be coaxed round as if I was a baby or a puppy. If I can't have kindness, I'll have independence.

 

HIGGINS. Independence? That's middle class blasphemy. We are all dependent on one another, every soul of us on earth.

 

LIZA [rising determinedly] I'll let you see whether I'm dependent on you. If you can preach, I can teach. I'll go and be a teacher.

 

HIGGINS. What'll you teach, in heaven's name?

 

LIZA. What you taught me. I'll teach phonetics.

 

HIGGINS. Ha! Ha! Ha!

 

LIZA. I'll offer myself as an assistant to Professor Nepean.

 

HIGGINS [rising in a fury] What! That impostor! that humbug! that toadying ignoramus! Teach him my methods! my discoveries! You take one step in his direction and I'll wring your neck. [He lays hands on her]. Do you hear?

 

LIZA [defiantly non-resistant] Wring away. What do I care? I knew you'd strike me some day. [He lets her go, stamping with rage at having forgotten himself, and recoils so hastily that he stumbles back into his seat on the ottoman]. Aha! Now I know how to deal with you. What a fool I was not to think of it before! You can't take away the knowledge you gave me. You said I had a finer ear than you. And I can be civil and kind to people, which is more than you can. Aha! That's done you, Henry Higgins, it has. Now I don't care that [snapping her fingers] for your bullying and your big talk. I'll advertize it in the papers that your duchess is only a flower girl that you taught, and that she'll teach anybody to be a duchess just the same in six months for a thousand guineas. Oh, when I think of myself crawling under your feet and being trampled on and called names, when all the time I had only to lift up my finger to be as good as you, I could just kick myself.

 

HIGGINS [wondering at her] You damned impudent slut, you! But it's better than snivelling; better than fetching slippers and finding spectacles, isn't it? [Rising] By George, Eliza, I said I'd make a woman of you; and I have. I like you like this.

 

LIZA. Yes: you turn round and make up to me now that I'm not afraid of you, and can do without you.

 

HIGGINS. Of course I do, you little fool. Five minutes ago you were like a millstone round my neck. Now you're a tower of strength: a consort battleship. You and I and Pickering will be three old bachelors together instead of only two men and a silly girl.

 

Mrs. Higgins returns, dressed for the wedding. Eliza instantly becomes cool and elegant.

 

MRS. HIGGINS. The carriage is waiting, Eliza. Are you ready?

 

LIZA. Quite. Is the Professor coming?

 

MRS. HIGGINS. Certainly not. He can't behave himself in church. He makes remarks out loud all the time on the clergyman's pronunciation.

 

LIZA. Then I shall not see you again, Professor. Good bye. [She goes to the door].

 

MRS. HIGGINS [coming to Higgins] Good-bye, dear.

 

HIGGINS. Good-bye, mother. [He is about to kiss her, when he recollects something]. Oh, by the way, Eliza, order a ham and a Stilton cheese, will you? And buy me a pair of reindeer gloves, number eights, and a tie to match that new suit of mine, at Eale & Binman's. You can choose the color. [His cheerful, careless, vigorous voice shows that he is incorrigible].

 

LIZA [disdainfully] Buy them yourself. [She sweeps out].

 

MRS. HIGGINS. I'm afraid you've spoiled that girl, Henry. But never mind, dear: I'll buy you the tie and gloves.

 

HIGGINS [sunnily] Oh, don't bother. She'll buy em all right enough. Good-bye.

 

They kiss. Mrs. Higgins runs out. Higgins, left alone, rattles his cash in his pocket; chuckles; and disports himself in a highly self-satisfied manner.

 

 

The rest of the story need not be shown in action, and indeed, would hardly need telling if our imaginations were not so enfeebled by their lazy dependence on the ready-makes and reach-me-downs of the ragshop in which Romance keeps its stock of "happy endings" to misfit all stories. Now, the history of Eliza Doolittle, though called a romance because of the transfiguration it records seems exceedingly improbable, is common enough. Such transfigurations have been achieved by hundreds of resolutely ambitious young women since Nell Gwynne set them the example by playing queens and fascinating kings in the theatre in which she began by selling oranges. Nevertheless, people in all directions have assumed, for no other reason than that she became the heroine of a romance, that she must have married the hero of it. This is unbearable, not only because her little drama, if acted on such a thoughtless assumption, must be spoiled, but because the true sequel is patent to anyone with a sense of human nature in general, and of feminine instinct in particular.

Eliza, in telling Higgins she would not marry him if he asked her, was not coquetting: she was announcing a well-considered decision. When a bachelor interests, and dominates, and teaches, and becomes important to a spinster, as Higgins with Eliza, she always, if she has character enough to be capable of it, considers very seriously indeed whether she will play for becoming that bachelor's wife, especially if he is so little interested in marriage that a determined and devoted woman might capture him if she set herself resolutely to do it. Her decision will depend a good deal on whether she is really free to choose; and that, again, will depend on her age and income. If she is at the end of her youth, and has no security for her livelihood, she will marry him because she must marry anybody who will provide for her. But at Eliza's age a good-looking girl does not feel that pressure; she feels free to pick and choose. She is therefore guided by her instinct in the matter. Eliza's instinct tells her not to marry Higgins. It does not tell her to give him up. It is not in the slightest doubt as to his remaining one of the strongest personal interests in her life. It would be very sorely strained if there was another woman likely to supplant her with him. But as she feels sure of him on that last point, she has no doubt at all as to her course, and would not have any, even if the difference of twenty years in age, which seems so great to youth, did not exist between them.

As our own instincts are not appealed to by her conclusion, let us see whether we cannot discover some reason in it. When Higgins excused his indifference to young women on the ground that they had an irresistible rival in his mother, he gave the clue to his inveterate old-bachelordom. The case is uncommon only to the extent that remarkable mothers are uncommon. If an imaginative boy has a sufficiently rich mother who has intelligence, personal grace, dignity of character without harshness, and a cultivated sense of the best art of her time to enable her to make her house beautiful, she sets a standard for him against which very few women can struggle, besides effecting for him a disengagement of his affections, his sense of beauty, and his idealism from his specifically sexual impulses. This makes him a standing puzzle to the huge number of uncultivated people who have been brought up in tasteless homes by commonplace or disagreeable parents, and to whom, consequently, literature, painting, sculpture, music, and affectionate personal relations come as modes of sex if they come at all. The word passion means nothing else to them; and that Higgins could have a passion for phonetics and idealize his mother instead of Eliza, would seem to them absurd and unnatural. Nevertheless, when we look round and see that hardly anyone is too ugly or disagreeable to find a wife or a husband if he or she wants one, whilst many old maids and bachelors are above the average in quality and culture, we cannot help suspecting that the disentanglement of sex from the associations with which it is so commonly confused, a disentanglement which persons of genius achieve by sheer intellectual analysis, is sometimes produced or aided by parental fascination.

Now, though Eliza was incapable of thus explaining to herself Higgins's formidable powers of resistance to the charm that prostrated Freddy at the first glance, she was instinctively aware that she could never obtain a complete grip of him, or come between him and his mother (the first necessity of the married woman). To put it shortly, she knew that for some mysterious reason he had not the makings of a married man in him, according to her conception of a husband as one to whom she would be his nearest and fondest and warmest interest. Even had there been no mother-rival, she would still have refused to accept an interest in herself that was secondary to philosophic interests. Had Mrs. Higgins died, there would still have been Milton and the Universal Alphabet. Landor's remark that to those who have the greatest power of loving, love is a secondary affair, would not have recommended Landor to Eliza. Put that along with her resentment of Higgins's domineering superiority, and her mistrust of his coaxing cleverness in getting round her and evading her wrath when he had gone too far with his impetuous bullying, and you will see that Eliza's instinct had good grounds for warning her not to marry her Pygmalion.

And now, whom did Eliza marry? For if Higgins was a predestinate old bachelor, she was most certainly not a predestinate old maid. Well, that can be told very shortly to those who have not guessed it from the indications she has herself given them.

Almost immediately after Eliza is stung into proclaiming her considered determination not to marry Higgins, she mentions the fact that young Mr. Frederick Eynsford Hill is pouring out his love for her daily through the post. Now Freddy is young, practically twenty years younger than Higgins: he is a gentleman (or, as Eliza would qualify him, a toff), and speaks like one; he is nicely dressed, is treated by the Colonel as an equal, loves her unaffectedly, and is not her master, nor ever likely to dominate her in spite of his advantage of social standing. Eliza has no use for the foolish romantic tradition that all women love to be mastered, if not actually bullied and beaten. "When you go to women," says Nietzsche, "take your whip with you." Sensible despots have never confined that precaution to women: they have taken their whips with them when they have dealt with men, and been slavishly idealized by the men over whom they have flourished the whip much more than by women. No doubt there are slavish women as well as slavish men; and women, like men, admire those that are stronger than themselves. But to admire a strong person and to live under that strong person's thumb are two different things. The weak may not be admired and hero-worshipped; but they are by no means disliked or shunned; and they never seem to have the least difficulty in marrying people who are too good for them. They may fail in emergencies; but life is not one long emergency: it is mostly a string of situations for which no exceptional strength is needed, and with which even rather weak people can cope if they have a stronger partner to help them out. Accordingly, it is a truth everywhere in evidence that strong people, masculine or feminine, not only do not marry stronger people, but do not show any preference for them in selecting their friends. When a lion meets another with a louder roar "the first lion thinks the last a bore." The man or woman who feels strong enough for two, seeks for every other quality in a partner than strength.

The converse is also true. Weak people want to marry strong people who do not frighten them too much; and this often leads them to make the mistake we describe metaphorically as "biting off more than they can chew." They want too much for too little; and when the bargain is unreasonable beyond all bearing, the union becomes impossible: it ends in the weaker party being either discarded or borne as a cross, which is worse. People who are not only weak, but silly or obtuse as well, are often in these difficulties.

This being the state of human affairs, what is Eliza fairly sure to do when she is placed between Freddy and Higgins? Will she look forward to a lifetime of fetching Higgins's slippers or to a lifetime of Freddy fetching hers? There can be no doubt about the answer. Unless Freddy is biologically repulsive to her, and Higgins biologically attractive to a degree that overwhelms all her other instincts, she will, if she marries either of them, marry Freddy.

And that is just what Eliza did.

Complications ensued; but they were economic, not romantic. Freddy had no money and no occupation. His mother's jointure, a last relic of the opulence of Largelady Park, had enabled her to struggle along in Earlscourt with an air of gentility, but not to procure any serious secondary education for her children, much less give the boy a profession. A clerkship at thirty shillings a week was beneath Freddy's dignity, and extremely distasteful to him besides. His prospects consisted of a hope that if he kept up appearances somebody would do something for him. The something appeared vaguely to his imagination as a private secretaryship or a sinecure of some sort. To his mother it perhaps appeared as a marriage to some lady of means who could not resist her boy's niceness. Fancy her feelings when he married a flower girl who had become declassee under extraordinary circumstances which were now notorious!

It is true that Eliza's situation did not seem wholly ineligible. Her father, though formerly a dustman, and now fantastically disclassed, had become extremely popular in the smartest society by a social talent which triumphed over every prejudice and every disadvantage. Rejected by the middle class, which he loathed, he had shot up at once into the highest circles by his wit, his dustmanship (which he carried like a banner), and his Nietzschean transcendence of good and evil. At intimate ducal dinners he sat on the right hand of the Duchess; and in country houses he smoked in the pantry and was made much of by the butler when he was not feeding in the dining-room and being consulted by cabinet ministers. But he found it almost as hard to do all this on four thousand a year as Mrs. Eynsford Hill to live in Earlscourt on an income so pitiably smaller that I have not the heart to disclose its exact figure. He absolutely refused to add the last straw to his burden by contributing to Eliza's support.

Thus Freddy and Eliza, now Mr. and Mrs. Eynsford Hill, would have spent a penniless honeymoon but for a wedding present of 500 pounds from the Colonel to Eliza. It lasted a long time because Freddy did not know how to spend money, never having had any to spend, and Eliza, socially trained by a pair of old bachelors, wore her clothes as long as they held together and looked pretty, without the least regard to their being many months out of fashion. Still, 500 pounds will not last two young people for ever; and they both knew, and Eliza felt as well, that they must shift for themselves in the end. She could quarter herself on Wimpole Street because it had come to be her home; but she was quite aware that she ought not to quarter Freddy there, and that it would not be good for his character if she did.

Not that the Wimpole Street bachelors objected. When she consulted them, Higgins declined to be bothered about her housing problem when that solution was so simple. Eliza's desire to have Freddy in the house with her seemed of no more importance than if she had wanted an extra piece of bedroom furniture. Pleas as to Freddy's character, and the moral obligation on him to earn his own living, were lost on Higgins. He denied that Freddy had any character, and declared that if he tried to do any useful work some competent person would have the trouble of undoing it: a procedure involving a net loss to the community, and great unhappiness to Freddy himself, who was obviously intended by Nature for such light work as amusing Eliza, which, Higgins declared, was a much more useful and honorable occupation than working in the city. When Eliza referred again to her project of teaching phonetics, Higgins abated not a jot of his violent opposition to it. He said she was not within ten years of being qualified to meddle with his pet subject; and as it was evident that the Colonel agreed with him, she felt she could not go against them in this grave matter, and that she had no right, without Higgins's consent, to exploit the knowledge he had given her; for his knowledge seemed to her as much his private property as his watch: Eliza was no communist. Besides, she was superstitiously devoted to them both, more entirely and frankly after her marriage than before it.

It was the Colonel who finally solved the problem, which had cost him much perplexed cogitation. He one day asked Eliza, rather shyly, whether she had quite given up her notion of keeping a flower shop. She replied that she had thought of it, but had put it out of her head, because the Colonel had said, that day at Mrs. Higgins's, that it would never do. The Colonel confessed that when he said that, he had not quite recovered from the dazzling impression of the day before. They broke the matter to Higgins that evening. The sole comment vouchsafed by him very nearly led to a serious quarrel with Eliza. It was to the effect that she would have in Freddy an ideal errand boy.

Freddy himself was next sounded on the subject. He said he had been thinking of a shop himself; though it had presented itself to his pennilessness as a small place in which Eliza should sell tobacco at one counter whilst he sold newspapers at the opposite one. But he agreed that it would be extraordinarily jolly to go early every morning with Eliza to Covent Garden and buy flowers on the scene of their first meeting: a sentiment which earned him many kisses from his wife. He added that he had always been afraid to propose anything of the sort, because Clara would make an awful row about a step that must damage her matrimonial chances, and his mother could not be expected to like it after clinging for so many years to that step of the social ladder on which retail trade is impossible.

This difficulty was removed by an event highly unexpected by Freddy's mother. Clara, in the course of her incursions into those artistic circles which were the highest within her reach, discovered that her conversational qualifications were expected to include a grounding in the novels of Mr. H.G. Wells. She borrowed them in various directions so energetically that she swallowed them all within two months. The result was a conversion of a kind quite common today. A modern Acts of the Apostles would fill fifty whole Bibles if anyone were capable of writing it.

Poor Clara, who appeared to Higgins and his mother as a disagreeable and ridiculous person, and to her own mother as in some inexplicable way a social failure, had never seen herself in either light; for, though to some extent ridiculed and mimicked in West Kensington like everybody else there, she was accepted as a rational and normal—or shall we say inevitable?—sort of human being. At worst they called her The Pusher; but to them no more than to herself had it ever occurred that she was pushing the air, and pushing it in a wrong direction. Still, she was not happy. She was growing desperate. Her one asset, the fact that her mother was what the Epsom greengrocer called a carriage lady had no exchange value, apparently. It had prevented her from getting educated, because the only education she could have afforded was education with the Earlscourt green grocer's daughter. It had led her to seek the society of her mother's class; and that class simply would not have her, because she was much poorer than the greengrocer, and, far from being able to afford a maid, could not afford even a housemaid, and had to scrape along at home with an illiberally treated general servant. Under such circumstances nothing could give her an air of being a genuine product of Largelady Park. And yet its tradition made her regard a marriage with anyone within her reach as an unbearable humiliation. Commercial people and professional people in a small way were odious to her. She ran after painters and novelists; but she did not charm them; and her bold attempts to pick up and practise artistic and literary talk irritated them. She was, in short, an utter failure, an ignorant, incompetent, pretentious, unwelcome, penniless, useless little snob; and though she did not admit these disqualifications (for nobody ever faces unpleasant truths of this kind until the possibility of a way out dawns on them) she felt their effects too keenly to be satisfied with her position.

Clara had a startling eyeopener when, on being suddenly wakened to enthusiasm by a girl of her own age who dazzled her and produced in her a gushing desire to take her for a model, and gain her friendship, she discovered that this exquisite apparition had graduated from the gutter in a few months' time. It shook her so violently, that when Mr. H. G. Wells lifted her on the point of his puissant pen, and placed her at the angle of view from which the life she was leading and the society to which she clung appeared in its true relation to real human needs and worthy social structure, he effected a conversion and a conviction of sin comparable to the most sensational feats of General Booth or Gypsy Smith. Clara's snobbery went bang. Life suddenly began to move with her. Without knowing how or why, she began to make friends and enemies. Some of the acquaintances to whom she had been a tedious or indifferent or ridiculous affliction, dropped her: others became cordial. To her amazement she found that some "quite nice" people were saturated with Wells, and that this accessibility to ideas was the secret of their niceness. People she had thought deeply religious, and had tried to conciliate on that tack with disastrous results, suddenly took an interest in her, and revealed a hostility to conventional religion which she had never conceived possible except among the most desperate characters. They made her read Galsworthy; and Galsworthy exposed the vanity of Largelady Park and finished her. It exasperated her to think that the dungeon in which she had languished for so many unhappy years had been unlocked all the time, and that the impulses she had so carefully struggled with and stifled for the sake of keeping well with society, were precisely those by which alone she could have come into any sort of sincere human contact. In the radiance of these discoveries, and the tumult of their reaction, she made a fool of herself as freely and conspicuously as when she so rashly adopted Eliza's expletive in Mrs. Higgins's drawing-room; for the new-born Wellsian had to find her bearings almost as ridiculously as a baby; but nobody hates a baby for its ineptitudes, or thinks the worse of it for trying to eat the matches; and Clara lost no friends by her follies. They laughed at her to her face this time; and she had to defend herself and fight it out as best she could.

When Freddy paid a visit to Earlscourt (which he never did when he could possibly help it) to make the desolating announcement that he and his Eliza were thinking of blackening the Largelady scutcheon by opening a shop, he found the little household already convulsed by a prior announcement from Clara that she also was going to work in an old furniture shop in Dover Street, which had been started by a fellow Wellsian. This appointment Clara owed, after all, to her old social accomplishment of Push. She had made up her mind that, cost what it might, she would see Mr. Wells in the flesh; and she had achieved her end at a garden party. She had better luck than so rash an enterprise deserved. Mr. Wells came up to her expectations. Age had not withered him, nor could custom stale his infinite variety in half an hour. His pleasant neatness and compactness, his small hands and feet, his teeming ready brain, his unaffected accessibility, and a certain fine apprehensiveness which stamped him as susceptible from his topmost hair to his tipmost toe, proved irresistible. Clara talked of nothing else for weeks and weeks afterwards. And as she happened to talk to the lady of the furniture shop, and that lady also desired above all things to know Mr. Wells and sell pretty things to him, she offered Clara a job on the chance of achieving that end through her.

And so it came about that Eliza's luck held, and the expected opposition to the flower shop melted away. The shop is in the arcade of a railway station not very far from the Victoria and Albert Museum; and if you live in that neighborhood you may go there any day and buy a buttonhole from Eliza.

Now here is a last opportunity for romance. Would you not like to be assured that the shop was an immense success, thanks to Eliza's charms and her early business experience in Covent Garden? Alas! the truth is the truth: the shop did not pay for a long time, simply because Eliza and her Freddy did not know how to keep it. True, Eliza had not to begin at the very beginning: she knew the names and prices of the cheaper flowers; and her elation was unbounded when she found that Freddy, like all youths educated at cheap, pretentious, and thoroughly inefficient schools, knew a little Latin. It was very little, but enough to make him appear to her a Porson or Bentley, and to put him at his ease with botanical nomenclature. Unfortunately he knew nothing else; and Eliza, though she could count money up to eighteen shillings or so, and had acquired a certain familiarity with the language of Milton from her struggles to qualify herself for winning Higgins's bet, could not write out a bill without utterly disgracing the establishment. Freddy's power of stating in Latin that Balbus built a wall and that Gaul was divided into three parts did not carry with it the slightest knowledge of accounts or business: Colonel Pickering had to explain to him what a cheque book and a bank account meant. And the pair were by no means easily teachable. Freddy backed up Eliza in her obstinate refusal to believe that they could save money by engaging a bookkeeper with some knowledge of the business. How, they argued, could you possibly save money by going to extra expense when you already could not make both ends meet? But the Colonel, after making the ends meet over and over again, at last gently insisted; and Eliza, humbled to the dust by having to beg from him so often, and stung by the uproarious derision of Higgins, to whom the notion of Freddy succeeding at anything was a joke that never palled, grasped the fact that business, like phonetics, has to be learned.

On the piteous spectacle of the pair spending their evenings in shorthand schools and polytechnic classes, learning bookkeeping and typewriting with incipient junior clerks, male and female, from the elementary schools, let me not dwell. There were even classes at the London School of Economics, and a humble personal appeal to the director of that institution to recommend a course bearing on the flower business. He, being a humorist, explained to them the method of the celebrated Dickensian essay on Chinese Metaphysics by the gentleman who read an article on China and an article on Metaphysics and combined the information. He suggested that they should combine the London School with Kew Gardens. Eliza, to whom the procedure of the Dickensian gentleman seemed perfectly correct (as in fact it was) and not in the least funny (which was only her ignorance) took his advice with entire gravity. But the effort that cost her the deepest humiliation was a request to Higgins, whose pet artistic fancy, next to Milton's verse, was calligraphy, and who himself wrote a most beautiful Italian hand, that he would teach her to write. He declared that she was congenitally incapable of forming a single letter worthy of the least of Milton's words; but she persisted; and again he suddenly threw himself into the task of teaching her with a combination of stormy intensity, concentrated patience, and occasional bursts of interesting disquisition on the beauty and nobility, the august mission and destiny, of human handwriting. Eliza ended by acquiring an extremely uncommercial script which was a positive extension of her personal beauty, and spending three times as much on stationery as anyone else because certain qualities and shapes of paper became indispensable to her. She could not even address an envelope in the usual way because it made the margins all wrong.

Their commercial school days were a period of disgrace and despair for the young couple. They seemed to be learning nothing about flower shops. At last they gave it up as hopeless, and shook the dust of the shorthand schools, and the polytechnics, and the London School of Economics from their feet for ever. Besides, the business was in some mysterious way beginning to take care of itself. They had somehow forgotten their objections to employing other people. They came to the conclusion that their own way was the best, and that they had really a remarkable talent for business. The Colonel, who had been compelled for some years to keep a sufficient sum on current account at his bankers to make up their deficits, found that the provision was unnecessary: the young people were prospering. It is true that there was not quite fair play between them and their competitors in trade. Their week-ends in the country cost them nothing, and saved them the price of their Sunday dinners; for the motor car was the Colonel's; and he and Higgins paid the hotel bills. Mr. F. Hill, florist and greengrocer (they soon discovered that there was money in asparagus; and asparagus led to other vegetables), had an air which stamped the business as classy; and in private life he was still Frederick Eynsford Hill, Esquire. Not that there was any swank about him: nobody but Eliza knew that he had been christened Frederick Challoner. Eliza herself swanked like anything.

That is all. That is how it has turned out. It is astonishing how much Eliza still manages to meddle in the housekeeping at Wimpole Street in spite of the shop and her own family. And it is notable that though she never nags her husband, and frankly loves the Colonel as if she were his favorite daughter, she has never got out of the habit of nagging Higgins that was established on the fatal night when she won his bet for him. She snaps his head off on the faintest provocation, or on none. He no longer dares to tease her by assuming an abysmal inferiority of Freddy's mind to his own. He storms and bullies and derides; but she stands up to him so ruthlessly that the Colonel has to ask her from time to time to be kinder to Higgins; and it is the only request of his that brings a mulish expression into her face. Nothing but some emergency or calamity great enough to break down all likes and dislikes, and throw them both back on their common humanity—and may they be spared any such trial!—will ever alter this. She knows that Higgins does not need her, just as her father did not need her. The very scrupulousness with which he told her that day that he had become used to having her there, and dependent on her for all sorts of little services, and that he should miss her if she went away (it would never have occurred to Freddy or the Colonel to say anything of the sort) deepens her inner certainty that she is "no more to him than them slippers", yet she has a sense, too, that his indifference is deeper than the infatuation of commoner souls. She is immensely interested in him. She has even secret mischievous moments in which she wishes she could get him alone, on a desert island, away from all ties and with nobody else in the world to consider, and just drag him off his pedestal and see him making love like any common man. We all have private imaginations of that sort. But when it comes to business, to the life that she really leads as distinguished from the life of dreams and fancies, she likes Freddy and she likes the Colonel; and she does not like Higgins and Mr. Doolittle. Galatea never does quite like Pygmalion: his relation to her is too godlike to be altogether agreeable.

 



FeltöltőP. T.
Az idézet forrásahttp://www.gutenberg.org

Pygmalion (Magyar)

ELSŐ FELVONÁS

 

London, este tizenegy óra tizenöt perc. Mennydörgés, nyári zápor. Az emberek itt is, ott is kétségbeesve fütyülnek kocsiért. A gyalogjárók a Szent Pál-templom oszlopcsarnoka alá futva keresnek fedelet. (Ez nem a Wren építette katedrális, hanem az Inigo Jones-féle templom a Covent Garden zöldségpiacán.) A csoportban egy hölgy és a leánya estélyi ruhában. Valamennyien mogorván bámulnak ki az esőbe, kivéve egy férfit, ki a többieknek hátat fordítva, feszült figyelemmel jegyez noteszébe.

A toronyóra egynegyedet üt.

 

A LEÁNY

(a középső oszlopközben, a balján levő oszlopnak támaszkodva) Csuromvíz vagyok. Mit csinál már az a Freddy? Húsz perce oda van.

 

AZ ANYA

(lánya jobbján) Nincs még húsz perce. De kaphatott volna már kocsit.

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

(a hölgy jobbján) Nem kap az, kérem, fél tizenkettőig... Majd ha a színházból hazafuvarozták a népet, aztán.

 

AZ ANYA

Hogyhogy nem kap?! Nem állhatunk itt fél tizenkettőig! Mégiscsak szörnyű!

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Én igazán nem tehetek róla!

 

A LEÁNY

Kaphatott volna kocsit a színház előtt, ha nem volna olyan mafla.

 

AZ ANYA

Ugyan már, mit tehet szegény fiú?!

 

A LEÁNY

Mások is kaptak kocsit, mért csak ő nem?

 

Freddy berohan a Southampton út felől, és csöpögő esernyőjét becsukva, megáll közöttük. Húszéves fiatalember, frakkban, a nadrágja alul csupa víz.

 

A LEÁNY

Nincs kocsi?

 

FREDDY

Semmi pénzért. Ezeknek rimánkodhat az ember!

 

AZ ANYA

Dehogy nincs, Freddy, biztos meg se próbáltad!

 

A LEÁNY

Hát ez borzasztó! Azt akarod, hogy mi szaladgáljunk kocsi után?

 

FREDDY

De mondom, hogy mind foglalt. Olyan hirtelen jött ez a zápor, senki se számított rá. Mindenkinek kocsi kellett. El voltam egész fel Charing Crossig és le a Körtérig, de egytől egyig mind foglalt volt.

 

AZ ANYA

Próbáltad a Trafalgar téren is?

 

FREDDY

Nincs kocsi a Trafalgar téren!

 

A LEÁNY

Próbáltad?

 

FREDDY

Mindenütt próbáltam egész a pályaudvarig - azt várnád, hogy kisétáljak Hammersmithbe?

 

A LEÁNY

Nem próbáltál te semmit!

 

AZ ANYA

Csakugyan élhetetlen vagy, Freddy. Eredj újra, de vissza ne gyere kocsi nélkül!

 

FREDDY

Bőrig ázom, és semmi értelme!

 

A LEÁNY

Hát mi ?! Talán itt álljunk a huzatban egy szál ruhában reggelig? Lajhár!

 

FREDDY

Jól van, megyek már, megyek. (Kinyitja ernyőjét, és rohanna el, de beleütközik egy virágáruslányba, aki ugyancsak tető alá menekül, s kiüti kezéből a kosarat. Vakító villámfény, és nyomában fülsiketítő mennydörgés kíséri a balesetet)

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Ejnye má, no, Freddy! Nem lát a szemitül?

 

FREDDY

Bocsánat! (Elviharzik)

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(szedi össze kosarába a kiborult virágot) Finom modor, mondhatom, két csokornak kampec! (Leül az oszlop lábánál, a hölgy jobbján, virágait rendezgetve. Cseppet sem romantikus jelenség. Talán tizennyolc éves, legfeljebb húsz. Kis fekete tengerész-szalmakalapot hord, melyre régóta ülepszik már London piszka, korma, s kefét tán sose látott. Hajára is ráférne a mosás: egérszürke színe aligha természetes. Derékban szűk, silány gyapjúból készült kopott kabátja csaknem térdig ér. Barna szoknyája van és durva vászonköténye. Cipője rongyosabb már nem is lehetne. A lány olyan tiszta, amilyen valaki efféle körülmények között lehet; a hölgyek mellett mindenesetre piszkos. Arca semmivel sem durvább, mint azoké, de ápoltnak legkevésbé sem mondható. Alaposan ráférne a fogorvosi kezelés is)

 

AZ ANYA

Honnan tudja, kérem, hogy a fiamat Freddynek hívják?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Ez a manusz a maga fia? No iszen, szép kis mamuska az ilyen, csak bámulja, hogy a fiatalúr a virágomon tiprakodik, osztán - alászolgálja - olajra lép! Maga fogja megfizetni!

 

A LEÁNY

Eszedbe ne jusson, mama! Még csak az kellene!

 

AZ ANYA

Ezt bízd rám, igen? Van aprópénzed, Clara?

 

A LEÁNY

Nincs. Hat penny a legapróbb.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(reménykedve) Tudok visszaadni, van itt annyi apróm, kedves naccsága!

 

AZ ANYA

(Clarához) Add ide!

 

Clara odaadja, de mintha a fogát húznák.

 

AZ ANYA

(a lányhoz) Tessék, a virágokért.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

...csókolom, naccsága.

 

A LEÁNY

Mondd, hogy adjon vissza! Egy ilyen vacak csokor nincs több egy pennynél.

 

AZ ANYA

Hallgass. (A virágáruslányhoz) Csak tartsa meg mind.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

...csókolom.

 

AZ ANYA

De most mondja meg, honnan tudja a fiatalúr nevét?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Nem tom én a nevit.

 

AZ ANYA

Hallottam, hogy szólította. Ne akarjon túljárni az eszemen.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(méltatlankodva) Ki akar a maga eszin túljárni? Mit tudom én, mit mondtam: Freddy vagy Charlie; maga is csak így tesz, ha idegennel kedves akar lenni. Érdekes!

 

A LEÁNY

Hat pennyt kidobtál az ablakon. Jaj, mama, ettől igazán megkímélhetted volna Freddyt! (Undorral húzódik az oszlop mögé)

 

Idősebb, kellemes, katonás öregúr fut be, ázott ernyőjét összecsukja. A nadrágja éppolyan vizes, mint Freddyé volt. Frakkja felett könnyű felöltőt hord. Oda áll be, ahol az imént Clara állt.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Hű!

 

AZ ANYA

(az úrhoz) Semmi remény, hogy eláll?

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Attól tartok, semmi. Két perccel ezelőtt még erősebben rákezdte. (Odamegy az oszlophoz, mely alatt a virágáruslány ül, s lábát az oszloptalpazatra téve, lehajtogatja feltűrt nadrágját)

 

AZ ANYA

Ó, istenem! (Elszontyolodva vonul vissza leánya mellé)

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(mindjárt fel akarja használni a katonás úr szomszédságát baráti kapcsolatok kiépítésére) Akkor szok erőssen esni, mikor má nem sokára el akar áni. Sose busujjon, kapitány úr: ehun-e, vegyen virágot egy szegény lánytul.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Sajnos, nincs apróm.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Asse baj! Van nekem: adok vissza.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Egy aranyból? Nincs kisebb pénzem.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Püff neki! Tessen má venni egy szálat, kapitány úr. Egy félkoronást fölváltok. Ehune: ez csak két penny.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Na, ne zavarjon, lányom. (Zsebében kutat) Igazán nincs apróm... Hopp! Mégis... itt van három penny... ha éppen hasznát veheti... (A másik oszlophoz vonul)

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(csalódott, de azt gondolja: három penny is jobb, mint semmi) Kösszépen.

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

(a virágáruslányhoz) Jó lesz vigyázni: adjon érte egy virágot! Az a szivar ott hátul csupa fül: minden szavát fölírja.

 

Mindenki a háttérben jegyző férfira néz

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(rémülten ugrik fel) Nem csináltam semmit, csak megszólítottam... Szabad énnekem a fal mellett virágot árúni... (Magából kikelve) Nem vagyok én afféle... én csak aszontam, hogy vegyen virágot!

 

Általános zsivaj. Láthatólag rokonszenveznek a virágáruslánnyal, de helytelenítik, hogy olyan érzékeny.

 

HANGOK

Ne kiabáljon! - Ki bántja magát? - Egy ujjal se nyúltak magához, mit akar? - Ne lármázzon! - No, nem kell megijedni. - Semmi baj... stb. (Az öregebbek és higgadtabbak nyugtatják és vigasztalják. De vannak türelmetlenek is, akik ráordítanak, hogy fogja be a száját, vagy durván kérdik: "Mi lelte?" Egy távolabbi csoport közel tolakszik és kérdezősködésével növeli az általános hangzavart) Mi az? - Mi van? - Mit csinált? - Hol van? - Elkapta a hekus! - Elkapták? - Az ott? - Az hát. - Az öreget vágta meg... stb.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(átfurakszik a tömegen, és kiabálva fordul az idős úrhoz) Ne tessen engedni, hogy fölírjon. Nem is teccik tunni, milyen nagy baj az nekem. Még maj csúffá tesznek, bekísérnek, csak mer megszólítom a népeket az uccán... Még maj...

 

A NOTESZÉBE JEGYEZGETŐ FÉRFI

Na, na, na, na! Ki bántja magát? Megbolondult? Minek néz engem?

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Semmi baj: úriember. Nézze meg a cipőit. (Magyarázza a noteszébe jegyezgető férfinak) Hekusnak nézte az urat.

 

A NOTESZES

(élénk érdeklődéssel) Mi az a hekus?

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Hekus? Hát - az hekus... Így híjja azt mindenki. Olyan spicliféle.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(még mindig magából kikelve) Follyon ki a szemem, ha csak egy rossz szót is szótam...

 

A NOTESZES

(rákiált, de csupa jókedvvel) Csend, csend, csend legyen, na! Hát olyan vagyok én, mint valami detektív?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(cseppet sem nyugszik meg) Akkor mit firkált? Hogy tudhassam én, hogy mit firkált össze rúlam? Mutassa, de mingyá. (A férfi kinyitja a noteszét, és az orra alá tartja. A tömeg a válla felett próbál belekukucskálni a noteszbe, egymás hegyén-hátán tülekedve. Ha gyengébb legény volna, fel is löknék) Hát emmi? Macskakaparás. El se tudom óvasni.

 

A NOTESZES

(olvassa, hajszálra utánozva a virágáruslány kiejtését) "Sose busujjon, kapitány úr: ehun-e, vegyen virágot egy szegény lánytul."

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Az a baj, hogy kapitánnak híttam? Hát hogy kellett vóna? Nem akartam én semmi rosszat. (Az öregúrhoz) Igazán, naccságos úr, ne tessen engenni, hogy azé az egy szóé fölírjon. Lelkire venné, hogy bepöröjjön...

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Dehogy perelem! (A noteszeshez) Valóban, uram, ha ön detektív, teljesen felesleges, hogy engem fiatal nők tolakodása ellen védelmezzen, amíg erre magam nem kérem. Mindenki láthatta, hogy a leánynak semmi rossz szándéka nem volt.

 

A közelállók felháborodva tiltakoznak a rendőrkémek ellen.

 

HANGOK

Mindenki láthatta. - Mi köze hozzá? - Törődjön a maga dolgával! - Jó volna egy kis előléptetés, mi? - Még hogy leírja, amit az ember beszél! - Az a lány hozzá se szólt. - És ha szólt volna hozzá? - Szép kis dolog! - Egy lány már fedelet se kereshet... mindjárt inzultálják... stb.

 

A jobb indulatú körülállók visszavezetik a virágáruslányt az oszlop lábához. A lány leül, és izgatottsággal küszködik.

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Nem hekus ez. Csak olyan minden lébe kanál. Én mondom. Csak meg köll nézni a cipőjit.

 

A NOTESZES

(barátságosan hozzáfordul) Hogy vannak a kedves rokonai Selseyben?

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

(gyanakodva) Ki mondta magának, hogy az én rokonaim Selseybe vannak?

 

A NOTESZES

Nem fontos. Tudom. (A lányhoz) És maga hogy szakadt ide? Hiszen Doverben született.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Hát osztán? Má az is baj, hogy Doverbül elgyöttem? Disznónak való helyem vót ott. Oszt négy és fél shilling a szobáér egy hétre! (Sírva fakad) Bu-hu-hu!

 

A NOTESZES

Lakjon, ahol akar, csak ne bőgjön.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

(a lányhoz) Na, na, csak ne féljen semmitől... egy ujjal sem nyúlhat magához. Maga ott lakik, ahol magának tetszik.

 

MÁSODIK ÁCSORGÓ

(szarkasztikus alak, a noteszes és az öregúr közé furakodik) Például a villanegyedben, mi? Szívesen elcsevegnék uraságoddal a lakáskérdésről.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(igen elkámpicsorodva ül a kosara mellett, és bánatosan motyog magában) Pedig én tisztességes lány vagyok...

 

MÁSODIK ÁCSORGÓ

(nem figyel a lányra) Hát azt tudja-e, hogy én honnat való vagyok?

 

A NOTESZES

(azonnal) Hoxtonból.

 

Kuncogás, növekvő érdeklődés.

 

MÁSODIK ÁCSORGÓ

(ámulva) Nem is tagadom. De ilyet! Maga mindent kitalál.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(még mindig méltatlankodik) Mit ártsa magát az én dógomba?... Semmi köze hozzá...

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Úgy van: semmi köze hozzá. Ne tűrje! (A noteszeshez) Mi címen avatkozik az úr a más dolgába, amikor senki se kérdezte?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Beszélhet, amit akar, nekem nyóc. Szóba se állok vele.

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Minek néz minket? Kapcarongynak? Bezzeg valami úr félével nem merne így packázni.

 

MÁSODIK ÁCSORGÓ

Az ám: ha olyan nagy jóstehetség, ennek az úrnak mondja meg, honnat való. (Az öregúr felé int)

 

A NOTESZES

Cheltenham, Harrow, Cambridge, India.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Eltalálta.

 

Nagy nevetés. A noteszes kezd tetszeni.

 

HANGOK

Tud ez mindent. - Megmondta apróra. - Hallotta, hogy eltalálta? - Megmondta, hol, merre járt.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Szabad kérdeznem: varietékben szokott fellépni ezzel a tudományával?

 

A NOTESZES

Gondoltam már erre. Talán egyszer fellépek.

 

Elállt az eső. A csoportok szélén ácsorgók kezdenek elszállingózni.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(felbátorodva) Mondom, hogy nem úriember. Ha avvóna, nem maceráná a szegény lányokat.

 

A LEÁNY

(türelmét vesztve előretör, és félrelöki az öregurat, aki udvariasan vonul át az oszlop másik oldalára) Hol van már az a Freddy? Tüdőgyulladást kapok, ha tovább is itt kell állnom ebben a cúgban!

 

A NOTESZES

(jegyezve, mintegy magának) Earlscourt.

 

A LEÁNY

(dühösen) Lesz szíves megtartani a tolakodó megjegyzéseit!

 

A NOTESZES

Hangosan mondtam? Bocsánat, nem akartam. De a kedves mama kétségtelenül epsomi.

 

AZ ANYA

(előrejön lánya és a noteszes közé) Jaj, de érdekes! Ott, a Derék Asszony Ligetében nőttem fel, Epsom mellett.

 

A NOTESZES

(hangosan nevet) Micsoda liget! Bocsánat. (Clarához) Kocsit óhajt, ha nem csalódom.

 

A LEÁNY

Kérem, ne merjen velem társalgást kezdeni.

 

AZ ANYA

De Clara, Clara! Nagyon kérlek! (Clara dühös pillantást vet rá, és gőgösen visszavonul) Végtelenül hálásak lennénk önnek, ha egy kocsit tudna keríteni. (A noteszes egy sípot vesz elő) Ó, nagyon köszönöm, igazán... (Visszatér leányához.)

 

A noteszes éles füttyöt hallat.

 

MÁSODIK ÁCSORGÓ

Tessék! Megmondtam, hogy civil ruhás rendőr.

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Ez nem rendőrsíp, ez vadászsíp.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(még mindig megbántva morfondíroz) A becsületem, azt ne bántsa... Hogy meri?... Tudok én arra úgy vigyázni, mint az úri dámák.

 

A NOTESZES

Nem tudom, észrevették-e: az eső már két perce elállt.

 

ELSŐ ÁCSORGÓ

Az ám. Mér nem mondta ezt az előbb? Csak lopja itt az ember idejit a marhaságaival. (Elmegy)

 

MÁSODIK ÁCSORGÓ (a noteszeshez) Én is megmondom magának, honnat való: a diliházbul. Menjen vissza, oszt kérjen egy csillapító inekciót.

 

A NOTESZES

(szolgálatkészen kijavítja) Injekciót.

 

MÁSODIK ÁCSORGÓ (utánozva a választékos beszédet) Lekötelez, professzor úr! (Gúnyosan megböki kalapját és elballag)

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Így ráijjeszteni az emberre. Hogy esne az űneki, ha vele csinánák?

 

AZ ANYA

Már egész jó idő van! Mehetünk az autóbuszhoz... Gyere, Clara! (Bokán felül felfogja a szoknyáját, és elszalad a megálló felé)

 

A LEÁNY

De hát a kocsi... (Az anya már nem hallja) Ezt a cirkuszt! (Dühösen utánaszalad)

 

Mindenki távozott, kivéve a noteszest, az öregurat és a virágáruslányt. A lány még mindig a kosarát rendezgeti, és önmagát sajnálgatva morog.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Nincs elég baja a szegény lánynak... Még szekírozzák is... még macerájják is...

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

(visszatér előbbi helyére, a noteszes baljára) Hogy csinálja ezt, ha szabad kérdeznem?

 

A NOTESZES

Fonetika - semmi más. A beszéd tudománya. Ez a mesterségem, és ez a bogaram. Nincs nagyobb boldogság, mint ha az ember meg tud élni a bogarából. A yorkshire-it vagy az írlandit mindenki felismeri a tájszólásáról. Nos, én bárkiről meg tudom állapítani hat mérföldnyi pontossággal, hová való, mihelyt kinyitja a száját. A londoniról két mérföldnyi pontossággal megmondom, hol lakik. Néha még az utcát sem tévesztem el.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Nemhogy röstellené a nyavalyás.

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

És meg lehet ebből élni?

 

A NOTESZES

Hogyne. Mégpedig egész jól. Újgazdagok és sznobok korát éljük. Az emberek valahol a zsibpiac táján kezdik évi nyolcvan fonttal, és a villanegyedben végzik évi százezerrel. A zsibpiacot persze legszívesebben letagadnák. De mihelyt kinyitják a szájukat, elárulják maguk. Nos, én kitanítom őket.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Törőnne inkább a maga dógáva, ahhelyett, hogy a szegén lányokat nyaggassa...

 

A NOTESZES

Nyaggatja! Hagyja már abba ezt a förtelmes makogást, vagy keressen magának egy másik templomot.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(bizonytalanul tiltakozva) Nekem éppúgy szabad itt maranni, mint magának.

 

A NOTESZES

Olyan nőnek, aki ilyen elkeserítő, förtelmes hangokat képes kiadni a torkán, sehol a világon nem szabad megmaradnia... annak nincs joga élni. Jusson eszébe, hogy maga emberi lény, akinek lelke van, akinek megadatott az artikulált beszéd képessége! Jusson eszébe, hogy a maga nyelve Shakespeare nyelve, Milton nyelve, a biblia nyelve! Ne gőgicséljen itt, mint egy epebajos gerlice.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(le van sújtva; részben csodálkozó, részben könyörgő pillantást vet rá, de a fejét nem meri felemelni) Hű-ű-ű...

 

A NOTESZES

(jegyez) Úristen! Micsoda hang! (Jegyez, majd kezében a notesszel a lány minden egyes hangját pontosan utánozza) Hű-ű-ű...

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(annyira mulattatja a produkció, hogy akarata ellenére elneveti magát) Mi a franc!...

 

A NOTESZES

Látja, hallja ezt a nőszemélyt a hajmeresztő dialektusával? Élete végéig ki nem vakarodna az utca mocskából. Nos, uram, én ebből a lányból három hónap alatt olyan hercegnőt faragok a módszeremmel, hogy megállja a helyét bármelyik nagykövet estélyén... sőt olyat, hogy felvennék akár szobalánynak vagy boltoskisasszonynak - mert ahhoz kell ám csak jó kiejtés!

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Mit beszél?

 

A NOTESZES

Igen, vegye tudomásul, maga szerencsétlen csatornatöltelék, anyanyelvünk sárbatiprója, éktelen szégyenfolt e nemes oszlopok alján - ha én akarom, Sába királynéjává teszem! (Az öregúrhoz) Hiszi vagy nem?

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Hogyne hinném! Én magam az indiai dialektusokkal foglalkozom, és ha egyszer...

 

A NOTESZES

Igazán? Nem ismeri Pickering ezredest, a "Tanuljunk könnyen, gyorsan szanszkritül" szerzőjét?

 

AZ IDŐS ÚR

Én vagyok Pickering ezredes. És ön?

 

A NOTESZES

Henry Higgins, a "Higgins-féle Egyetemes Abécé" szerzője.

 

PICKERING

(lelkesen) Indiából jövök, hogy önnel találkozzam!

 

HIGGINS

Indiába készültem, hogy önnel találkozzam!

 

PICKERING

Hol lakik?

 

HIGGINS

Wimpole utca 27/a. Legyen szerencsém már holnap.

 

PICKERING

Én a Carltonban lakom. Jöjjön velem rögtön, hadd beszélgetünk el vacsora közben!

 

HIGGINS

Pompás!

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(az ezredeshez, amint elmegy mellette) Vegyen má egy kis virágot, naccságos úr! Nincs egy vasam se lakbérre.

 

PICKERING

De igazán nincs apróm. Nagyon sajnálom. (Továbbmegy)

 

HIGGINS

(megdöbben a lány hazugságán) Hazudik. Az elébb mondta, hogy fel tud váltani félkoronást.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(elkeseredve áll fel) Elevenen kéne magát olajba sütni. (Lába elé dobja a kosarat) Ezt az egész istenverte kosarat e'viheti egy hatosér!

 

A toronyóra felet üt.

 

HIGGINS

(úgy hallgatja, mint az Úr hangját, mely farizeusi szűkmarkúságáért pirongatja) Ezt emlékül... (Ünnepélyesen megemeli a kalapját, és egy marék pénzt dob a lány kosarába, majd Pickering ezredes után siet)

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(felvesz egy félkoronást) Hű-ű-ű... (Szedi a többi pénzt össze) Hűű-ű-ű-ha! (Egy aranyat talál) A-á-á!... Há-á-oá-á!

 

FREDDY

(most ugrik ki egy taxiból) Végre kaptam taxit! Halló! (A lányhoz) Hol az a két hölgy, aki itt állt?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Elpályáztak, mihenst elállt az esső.

 

FREDDY

Itt hagynak, nyakamon a kocsival! Hogy azt a...

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(nagystílűen) Sose izguljon, fiatalember! Majd én megyek a taxival! (Egy ugrással a taxinál terem. A sofőr útját állja, s hátratett kézzel elszántan csukva tartja a kocsiajtót. A lány jól megérti ezt a bizalmatlanságot, s pénzzel teli markát a sofőr orra alá tartja) Egy kis taxizás nekem meg se kottyan, apukám! (A sofőr elvigyorodik és kinyitja a kocsi ajtaját) Hát a kosárral mi lesz?

 

SOFŐR

Ide vele! Két penny különdíj.

 

LIZA

Nem, nem! Ezt nekem ne bámujja senki. (Behajítja a taxiba, beszáll, és az ablakon kihajolva beszél tovább) Jóccakát, Freddy!

 

FREDDY

(ámulva emel kalapot) Jó éjszakát. (El)

 

SOFŐR

Hova?

 

LIZA

Bökkingi Palota.

 

SOFŐR

Mi? Mi? Bökkingi Palota?

 

LIZA

Tán nem tuggya, hun van? A Ződ Ligetbe, ahun a király lakik. Jóccakát, Freddy! Ne ácsorogjon má itt az utamba! Jóccakát!

 

SOFŐR

Ide hallgasson, mit akart azzal a Bökkingem Palotával. Mi dóga magának a Bökkingem Palotába?

 

LIZA

Semmi a világon. De azt ennek nem kötöm az órára. Vigyen haza!

 

SOFŐR

Hova haza?

 

LIZA

Külső Drury út, ott mingyá az Olajmagazin mellett.

 

SOFŐR

Ez már okosabb beszéd, anyukám. (Elhajt)

 

Kövessük a taxit a Külső Drury útra, az úgynevezett Angyaludvar bejáratáig, addig a kis keskeny bolthajtásig, a két üzlet között, melyek közül egyik az Olajmagazin. Amint a taxi megáll, Eliza kiszáll s előcibálja kosarát

 

LIZA

No, mennyi?

 

SOFŐR

(a taxamétert mutatva) Nem tud olvasni? Egy shilling.

 

LIZA

Egy shilling két percé!!

 

SOFŐR

Két perc vagy tíz perc, az egyre megy.

 

LIZA

Hát e' nem igasság!

 

SOFŐR

Ült már maga életibe taxiba?

 

LIZA

(méltósággal) Nem eccer, de százszor, kisapám!

 

SOFŐR

(ránevet) Ez már döfi! No, csak tartsd meg a schillinget, kisanyám. Csókoltatom az otthoniakat. Minden jót! (Elhajt)

 

LIZA

(megalázva) Pimasz!

 

Eliza fogja kosarát, és cipeli magával a kis átjárón keresztül, egészen a lakásáig: egy szűk kis szobáig, ahol a nedves falról cafatokban lóg a tapéta. Az egyik törött ablaküveg papírral van kifoltozva. A falra szegezve újságból kitépett lapok: egy híres színész arcképe, s egy divatrajz valami női divatlapból - csupa elérhetetlen vágyálom Eliza számára. Az ablakon madárkalicka lóg; lakója rég elpusztult: a kalicka már csak emlékét őrzi. Ennyi a luxus. Ami ezenkívül van, az a legnyomorúságosabb használati tárgyak minimuma: rozzant ágy, rajta szedett-vedett takarók, minden kacat, ami egy kis meleget adhat; valami ruhával leterített láda, rajta lavór és kancsó, fölötte csepp tükör; egy asztal és szék, amit valami külvárosi konyhából mustráltak ki; egy tűzhely, melyben sosem gyújtanak be; fölötte polc, s azon egy amerikai ébresztőóra. Mindezt egy gázlámpa világítja meg, mely csak akkor működik, ha egy pennyt dobnak a perselyébe. Lakbér: négy schilling hetenként. Eliza nagyon kimerült, de sokkal izgatottabb, semhogy lefekhetnék. Csak ül, új gazdagságát számba véve, álmodozva és tervezgetve, hogy mi mindent fog csinálni, míg egyszer csak el nem alszik a gázlámpa. Eliza most először élvezi azt a gyönyörűséget, hogy nyugodtan dobhat a perselybe még egy pennyt. De ez a tékozló gesztus nem öli ki belőle a takarékosság szükségének maró érzését: eszébe jut, hogy ágyban fekve sokkal olcsóbban és melegebben lehet álmodozni, tervezgetni, mint hideg tűzhely mellett ülve. Így hát leveti sálját és szoknyáját, s az ágyra dobja a többi takaróféle közé. Aztán lerúgja cipőjét, s minden további ruhaváltás nélkül bebújik az ágyba.

 

 

 

MÁSODIK FELVONÁS

 

 

Másnap délelőtt tizenegy órakor. Henry Higgins dolgozószobája a Wimpole utcai lakásban. A szoba az első emeleten van, és az utcára néz. Eredetileg szalonnak szánták, a háttér közepén kétszárnyú ajtó. Aki belép, a jobb sarokban két nagy irattartó szekrényt láthat, melyeknek sarkai derékszögben összeérnek. Ebben a sarokban áll egy lapos íróasztal, rajta egy fonográf, egy gégetükör és egy sor apró orgonasíp, fújtatóval; ezenkívül több üvegcilinder égővel, különböző sustorgású lángok fejlesztésére. Az égőket egy gumicső köti össze a falba illesztett gázcsappal. Több, különböző nagyságú hangvilla. Egy fél emberi fej életnagyságú mintája, mely keresztmetszetben mutatja a beszélőszerveket. Egy doboz, melyben a fonográf viaszlemezei állnak. Hátrább, ugyanazon az oldalon, kandalló, előtte, az ajtó szomszédságában, kényelmes bőrfotel és széntartó. A kandallón óra. A kandalló és az asztal között újságállvány. A középső ajtó másik oldalán, a belépők balján, szekrényke, sok keskeny fiókkal. Tetején telefon és telefonkönyv. A sarkok és az oldalfal legnagyobb részét egy zongora foglalja el. A billentyűzet azon az oldalon van, mely a legtávolabb esik az ajtótól. A pad, melyre a játszó ül, olyan széles, mint a zongora. A zongorán csemegéstál gyümölccsel, süteménnyel, csokoládéval megrakva.

 

A szoba közepe üres. A karosszékben és az asztal melletti két széken kívül még egy szék látható a kandalló közelében. A falakon metszetek (főleg Piranesitől) és mezzotintó-portrék. Festmények nincsenek. Pickering az asztalnál ül: éppen félretesz néhány kartonlapot s egy hangvillát, melyet az imént használt. Henry Higgins mellette áll, néhány kiálló fiókot tologatva be. A reggeli világításban látszik, hogy életerős, magas, vonzó, negyvenes férfi. Öltözéke hosszú, fekete kabát, afféle szalonkabát, fehér gallér és fekete selyemnyakkendő. Energikus tudóstípus, akit szenvedélyesen érdekel minden, ami tudományos módszerrel tanulmányozható, de nem törődik semmi egyébbel, sem magával, sem másokkal, még kevésbé mások érzelmeivel. Kora és termete ellenére sokszor inkább valami lármás, gátlástalan gyermekre emlékeztet: buzgón és nagy hangon "produkálja magát", s körülötte mindenkinek vigyáznia kell rá, nehogy valami rossz fát tegyen a tűzre. Kedélyállapotában szikrázó vidámság és viharos dühkitörések váltakoznak, aszerint, amint a dolgai pillanatnyilag jól vagy rosszul mennek. Általában annyira nyílt, őszinte és rosszindulat nélküli, hogy még akkor is szeretetre méltó, mikor a legesztelenebbül viselkedik.

 

HIGGINS

(az utolsó fiókot tolva be) Nos, azt hiszem, mindent megmutattam.

 

PICKERING

Hát ez bámulatos! A felét is alig értem.

 

HIGGINS

Parancsolja, hogy valamit újra megnézzünk?

 

PICKERING

(feláll és a kandallóhoz megy, háttal nekitámaszkodik) Nem, most nem. Mára igazán elég volt.

 

HIGGINS

(utána megy és mellé áll) Belefáradt, hogy folyton hangokra figyeljen, mi?

 

PICKERING

Halálosan. Én roppant nagyra voltam, hogy huszonnégy magánhangzót tudok megkülönböztetni, de az ön százharminc magánhangzója végképp leterített. Legtöbb esetben semmi különbséget sem hallok az egyes hangok közt.

 

HIGGINS

(nevet és a zongorához megy egy kis csemegéért) Gyakorlat dolga az egész. Először semmi különbséget nem hall, de aztán, ha türelmesen figyel, észreveszi, hogy ezek a hangok éppúgy nem hasonlítanak egymáshoz, mint az "á" a "bé"-hez. (Pearce-né, a házvezetőnő, benéz) Mi az?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(habozik, láthatólag zavarban van) Egy fiatal nőszemély keresi a tanár urat.

 

HIGGINS

Fiatal nőszemély?! Mit akar?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Azt mondja kérem, hogy a tanár úr nagyon fog örülni, ha megtudja, mért jött. Közönséges nőszemély, annyit mondhatok, de még milyen közönséges... El is küldtem volna, csak azt gondoltam, hátha beszéltetni tetszik a masinába. Csak nem csináltam valami hibát? Igazán, a tanár úr néha olyan furcsa vendégeket fogad - már tessék megbocsátani...

 

HIGGINS

Rendben van, Pearce-né. Érdekes a kiejtése?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Borzalmas, kérem! Én nem tudom, mi érdekes lehet abban.

 

HIGGINS

(Pickeringhez) Behívatjuk. Vezesse be, Pearce-né. (Asztalához siet és felemel egy hengert, hogy a fonográfba tegye)

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(csak félig-meddig törődött bele) Igenis, tanár úr. Maga az úr a házban (El)

 

HIGGINS

Ez kapóra jött! Most megmutatom, hogy készítem a felvételeket. Beszéltetni fogjuk, és én azonnal rögzítem, amit mond, először a Bell-féle Látható Beszéddel, azután a nagy Romic-apparátussal, és végül fonográfra vesszük, úgyhogy akárhányszor újra hallgathatja, kezében a leírt szöveggel.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(visszatér) Ez az a nő, tanár úr.

 

Belép a virágáruslány, teljes díszben. Három strucctoll van a kalapján: egy narancssárga, egy égszínkék meg egy tűzpiros. Köténye meglehetősen tiszta; silány gyapjúból készült kabátját is ügyesen rendbe hozta. Ennek a siralmas figurának bája, ártatlan hiúságával és magabiztos ábrázatával, meghatja Pickeringet, aki már Pearce-né megjelenésekor kihúzta magát. Ami Higginst illeti, ő férfi és nő közt csak annyi különbséget tesz, hogy amikor éppen nem dühöng és káromkodik valami apróság miatt, olyankor úgy hízeleg a nőknek, mint egy gyerek a dajkájának, ha valamit ki akar tőle csalni.

 

HIGGINS

(hirtelen felismerve a lányt, cseppet sem leplezi csalódását, és gyerek módjára fakad ki) De hisz ez az a lány, akiről tegnap jegyzeteket csináltam! Nem vehetem semmi hasznát. A doveri tájszólásról már épp elég felvételem van, több hengert nem pazarlok rá. (A lányhoz) Nincs szükségem magára, elmehet.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Szálljon csak le a lórul, még nem tudhassa, mér gyöttem! (Pearce-néhez, aki az ajtónál áll, további parancsra várva) Meg-e mondta neki, hogy taxival gyöttem?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Bolond beszéd, azt hiszi, hogy egy olyan úriembert, mint Higgins tanár úr, érdekli, hogy maga min jött ide?!

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Hogy aggya a bankot! Pedig az úr nem röstell órákat anni, nem bizony: magam fülivel hallottam. Nem azé gyöttem, hogy kunyorájjak, ha a pénzem nem elég jó, elmehetek máshova.

 

HIGGINS

Nem elég jó? Minek?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Magának. Mos má tuggya. Azé gyöttem, hogy leckét vegyek, teccik érteni? Megfizetek érte, nem kérem ingyen!

 

HIGGINS

(ámulva) De hát... (végre lélegzethez jut) mit mondjak én erre magának?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Ha úriember, aszongya, hogy tessen helyet foglalni. Nem érti, hogy jó bótot csinálhat velem?

 

HIGGINS

Pickering, leültessük ezt a madárijesztőt, vagy kidobjuk az ablakon?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(riadtan a zongorához fut, majd szembefordul) Hóóóóó, hőőőőő! (Sértődötten nyöszörögve) Ne mondják nekem, hogy madárijesztő, mondom, hogy úgy fizetek, mint akármelyik úrinő.

 

A két férfi mozdulatlanul, ámulva mered rá a szoba túlsó végéből.

 

PICKERING

(kedvesen) De hát mit akar tulajdonképpen?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Bótoskisasszony akarok lenni virágosnál. Nem akarok hóttig a kőrúton strihhelni a virágjajimmal. De nem kellek sehun, merhogy nem tudok finoman beszéni. Ő aszonta tennap, hogy meg tud tanittani. Hát jó. Itt vagyok. Megfizetem rendesen. Nem akarok én potyázni, minek piszkol akkor engem, mint valami kapcarongyot?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Hogy lehet már ilyen buta liba? Azt képzeli, hogy maga meg tudja fizetni Higgins tanár urat?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Mé ne tunnám? Épp oan jól tudom, min maga, hogy az óráké fizetni szok az ember. Én is fizetek.

 

HIGGINS

Mennyit fizet?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(diadalmasan) No, csakhogy megszólalt! Sajdítottam én, hogy megörül neki, ha visszakaphat valamit abbul a nagy marék pénzbül, amit tennap odavágott. (Bizalmasan) Be vót csiccsentve egy kicsit - mi?

 

HIGGINS

(parancsolóan) Üljön le!

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Ha csak úgy ajándékba akarta...

 

HIGGINS

(mennydörögve) Üljön le!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(szigorúan) Üljön le, fiam, fogadjon szót.

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

A-a-a-aj! (Artikulátlan hangokat hallat, s félig lázadozva, félig rettegve áll)

 

PICKERING

(igen nyájasan) Tessék helyet foglalni. (A kandalló melletti széket előretolja Higgins felé)

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

(félénken) Jól van, no. (Leül. Pickering visszatér a helyére)

 

HIGGINS

Mi a neve?

 

A VIRÁGÁRUSLÁNY

Liza Doolittle.

 

HIGGINS

(a szavakat pattogtatva szaval egy gyerekverset)

Liza, Lizi s Lizike

Fészket szednek izibe...

 

PICKERING

Nem találnak semmi mást...

 

HIGGINS

Összevissza négy tojást.

 

Nagyot nevetnek saját tréfájukon

 

LIZA

Ne dilizzenek má!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(Eliza széke mögé áll) Ne beszéljen így a tanár úrral!

 

LIZA

Mé nem beszél ő okossan?

 

HIGGINS

Térjünk az üzletre. Mennyit akar fizetni?

 

LIZA

Ne féjen, tudom, mi jár. Van egy barátném, az francia órákat szok venni egy igazi franciátul. Óráját tizennyóc pennyjével. De hát csak nem vóna képe annyit kérni, mint a francia, hiszen maga nem is franciául tanít, csak rendesen beszélni. Egy shillingnél többet nem fizetek. Ha kell - jó, ha nem kell - még jobb.

 

HIGGINS

(fel s alá jár a szobában, kulcsait és aprópénzét csörgetve a zsebében) Tudja-e, Pickering, hogy ha ezt a shillinget úgy tekintjük, mint a lány jövedelmének egy bizonyos percentjét, akkor ez legalább annyi, mintha egy milliomos hatvan-hetven fontot ajánlana.

 

PICKERING

Csak nem?

 

HIGGINS

Számítsuk ki. A milliomos egy napi jövedelme, mondjuk, százötven font. Ez a lány megkereshet napi két és fél shillinget.

 

LIZA

(gőggel) Hunnan veszi azt, hogy én csak...

 

HIGGINS

(folytatja) Napi keresete kétötödét kínálja fel nekem egy óráért. Egy milliomos napi jövedelmének kétötöde, az körülbelül hatvan font. Szép pénz. Főúri honorárium, esküszöm. Soha ennél gavallérabb ajánlatot nem kaptam.

 

LIZA

(rémülten áll fel) Hatvan font? Mit beszél? Sose kínáltam én magának hatvan fontot! Hunnan vennék én...

 

HIGGINS

Csend legyen!

 

LIZA

(pityeregve) Még hogy hatvan fontot... No hiszen...

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Ne bőgjön. Üljön le. Senki se nyúl a maga pénzéhez.

 

HIGGINS

De majd mindjárt a porolóhoz nyúlunk, ha sokat nyafog. Üljön le.

 

LIZA

(lassan engedelmeskedik) A-a-a... (Artikulátlan hangokat ad ki) Assz'ihetné az ember, hogy maga az apám.

 

HIGGINS

Ha elvállalom tanítványomnak, rosszabb leszek, mint két apa együttvéve. Tessék! (Selyemzsebkendőjét nyújtja a lánynak)

 

LIZA

E' minek?

 

HIGGINS

Hogy megtörölje a szemét... És az arcát is mindenütt, ahol nedves. Ezt tanulja meg: ez itt a zsebkendője, ez meg a kabátujja... Ne cserélje össze a kettőt, ha boltoskisasszony akar lenni.

 

Eliza teljesen meg van kavarodva, és gyámoltalanul néz rá.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Kár ezzel így beszélni, tanár úr, úgy sem érti. Különben sem szokott ez törülközni, sem így, sem úgy. (Elveszi tőle a zsebkendőt)

 

LIZA

(utánakap) Adja vissza, de rögtön! Nekem atta, nem magának.

 

PICKERING

(nevetve) Úgy is van. A zsebkendő már az ő tulajdona, Pearce-né.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(lemondóan) Úgy kell magának, tanár úr!

 

PICKERING

No, erre kíváncsi vagyok, Higgins! Emlékszik, mit mondott tegnap? "Olyan hercegnőt faragok belőle, hogy megállja a helyét akármelyik nagykövet estélyén..." Ha szavának áll, azt mondom: le a kalappal, Higgins a legnagyobb élő pedagógus a föld kerekén! Vállalok minden költséget - és fogadok, hogy nem sikerül. Fizetem az órákat!

 

LIZA

Jó ember a kapitány úr. Köszönöm szépen.

 

HIGGINS

(nézi a lányt, s elfogja a feladat kísértése) Nehéz ellenállni... Olyan elragadóan ordenáré, olyan hátborzongatóan mocskos...

 

LIZA

(felháborodva tiltakozik) Hó-ó-ó... hohó-ó-óó! Még hogy mocskos vónék? Megmostam én a kezem is a képem is, mielőtt idegyöttem, meg én!

 

PICKERING

Annyit látok, Higgins, hogy nem fogja hízelgéssel elcsavarni szegény lány fejét.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(gondterhelten) Ne tessék azt mondani. Sokféleképpen el lehet egy lány fejét csavarni. És senki olyan jól nem csinálja, mint a tanár úr. Akár akarja, akár nem. De remélem, nem tetszik a tanár urat valami bolondságba keverni?

 

HIGGINS

(egyre izgatottabb) Mi egyéb az élet, mint egy csomó kínálkozó, izgalmas bolondság? Ne szalasszunk el egyetlenegyet se! Azért is hercegnőt faragok ebből a trampliból!

 

LIZA

(méltatlankodva) A-a-a-a... (Artikulálatlan hangot ad ki)

 

HIGGINS

(elkapja a láz) Igenis: hat hónap múlva - de ha jó a füle és perdül a nyelve: három hónap múlva - oda viszem, ahova akarom, és annak adom ki, aminek akarom! Még ma munkához látunk - sőt: most azonnal! Pearce-né, kérem, vigye ki és mosdassa meg! Ha másképp nem megy, súrolóporral! Be van jól gyújtva a konyhában?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(ellenállva) Be van, de...

 

HIGGINS

(elsöprő hévvel) Vetkőztesse pucérra, és dobja tűzre minden rongyát! Telefonáljon akármelyik szalonba új ruhákért. Addig pedig tekerje be csomagolópapirosba.

 

LIZA

Maga nem úriember, ha ilyeneket beszél! Én tisztességes lány vagyok, hajja-e? Ismerem én a maga fajtáját!

 

HIGGINS

Ebből a kültelki szemérmességből elég volt. Tanuljon meg úgy viselkedni, mint egy hercegnő. Vigye ki, Pearce-né, és ha rugdalózik, verjen a fenekére!

 

LIZA

(felugrik s Pickering és Pearce-né közé fut, menedéket keresve) Azt má nem! Rendőrt hívok!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Azt se tudom, hol helyezzem el.

 

HIGGINS

Dugja a szemetesládába!

 

LIZA

A-a-a-a!... (Artikulálatlan hangot ad ki)

 

PICKERING

De Higgins! Térjen észre!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(elszántan) Tessék már gondolkozni is, tanár úr. Nem lehet csak úgy átgázolni mindenkin.

 

E korholó szavakra Higgins megjuhászodik. A tomboló orkánt váratlanul lágy zefir váltja fel.

 

HIGGINS

(szakszerűen tiszta hanglejtéssel) Én gázolok át mindenkin? Kedves Pearce-né, drága Pickering, soha eszem ágában sem volt bárkin is átgázolni. Minden erőmmel azon vagyok, hogy felkaroljuk ezt a szegény lányt. Segítségére kell lennünk, hogy képes legyen elfoglalni új helyét az életben. Ha nem fejeztem ki magam világosan, csak azért történt, mert nem akartam megbántani egyikőjük érzékenységét sem.

 

Eliza megnyugodva előbbi helyére lopózik.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(Pickeringhez) Hát tetszett már ilyet hallani?

 

PICKERING

(szívből nevetve) Soha, kedves Pearce-né, soha!

 

HIGGINS

(türelmesen) Mi a baj?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Az a baj, kérem, hogy nem szedhet csak úgy föl egy lányt, mint valami kavicsot a tengerparton.

 

HIGGINS

Miért nem?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Miért nem?! Azt se tudja, kicsoda! Kik a szülei? Hátha férjes asszony?

 

LIZA

Frászt!

 

HIGGINS

No, látja! Amint a lány igen helyesen megjegyezte: frászt! Még hogy férjes asszony! Hát nem tudja, hogy ennek az osztálynak a lányai egy évvel az esküvőjük után olyanok, mint egy elnyűtt, ötvenéves mosónő?!

 

LIZA

Ugyan ki venne el engem?

 

HIGGINS

(hirtelen átvált elbűvölő, behízelgő, ékesszóló stílusára) Esküszöm, Eliza, hogy még be sem fejeztük a munkát, s az utcákon már garmadával fognak heverni azoknak a férfiaknak a hullái, akik maga miatt lőtték magukat főbe.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Összevissza tetszik beszélni. Nem szabad ilyeneket mondani előtte!

 

LIZA

(határozott mozdulattal feláll) Megyek innet. Becsszavamra, hiányzik egy kereke! Ilyen dilis pacák engem ne taniccson.

 

HIGGINS

(legérzékenyebb pontján érzi magát megbántva, amint ráébred, hogy a lány fütyül ékesszólására) Micsoda? Én vagyok bolond? Úgy is jó! Kérem, Pearce-né, semmi szükség az új ruhákra? Dobja ki!

 

LIZA

(pityeregve) Ne-e-e-e-e-e-e!... Hozzám ne merjen nyúni!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Na látja, kár volt nyelvelni! (Az ajtóra mutatva) Erre, erre!

 

LIZA

(sírva) Kell is nekem a maguk ruhája! Föl se vettem vóna! (Eldobja a zsebkendőt) Veszek én ruhát magamnak!

 

HIGGINS

(fürgén felkapja a zsebkendőt, és elállja a leány útját) Maga hálátlan, rossz lány! Ez a köszönet, amiért ki akarom vakarni a sárból, ki akarom öltöztetni, ki akarom tanítani, mint egy úrinőt!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Nem, tanár úr, abból semmi sem lesz! Maga a rossz ember! Menjen haza, lányom, a szüleihez, és mondja meg nekik, hogy vigyázzanak jobban magára!

 

LIZA

Nincsenek is szüleim! Otthun aszonták; anyányi vagy mán, ájj meg a magad lábán! Azzal kisöpörtek.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Hol van az édesanyja?

 

LIZA

Sehun! Aki kidobott, az a hatodik mostohaanyám. De én megvótam nélkülük. Mer én rendes lány vagyok!

 

HIGGINS

Hát akkor meg mi értelme ennek az egész huzavonának? Ez a lány senkié - senkinek sem kell, csak nekem. (Pearce-néhez megy, és hízelgésre fordítja a szót) Nem akarná adoptálni a lányt, kedves Pearce-né? Hiszem, hogy sok öröme telnék benne! Ne vitatkozzunk tovább! Vigye szépen és...

 

PEARCE-NÉ

De hát mi legyen vele? Fizetést adjunk neki? Tessék már észre térni, tanár úr!

 

HIGGINS

Adjon neki pénzt, amennyi kell, és írja be a háztartási könyvbe. (Türelmetlenül) De mi szüksége pénzre? Kosztja, ruhája meglesz. Ha pénzt kap, csak elissza!

 

LIZA

(felé fordul) Mit piszkol engem? Ne lógasson! Akárki megszagúhattya a számat, sose vótam piás. (Pickeringhez) Maga úriember, ne haggya, hogy így pocskondiázzon!

 

PICKERING

(barátságos szemrehányással) Nem tűnt még fel önnek, Higgins, hogy a lánynak érzelmei is vannak?

 

HIGGINS

(kritikus szemmel nézi Elizát) Nem, nem hinném... semmi olyan, amivel törődni érdemes. (Kedvesen) Vannak érzelmei, Eliza?

 

LIZA

Láthassa, hogy vannak, éppúgy, mint másnak!

 

HIGGINS

(Pickeringhez, elgondolkozva) Látja, itt a bökkenő!

 

PICKERING

Miféle bökkenő?

 

HIGGINS

A grammatika! Fejébe kell vernünk a grammatikát. A kiejtés ehhez képest gyerekjáték.

 

LIZA

Nem kell nekem gramantika! Taniccson meg úgy beszélni, mint egy bótoskisasszony.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Ne beszéljünk mindig másról, tanár úr, szeretném végre tudni, milyen alkalmazásban lesz itt ez a lány? Havibért akar neki fizetni? És mi lesz vele, ha be tetszett fejezni a tanítást? Tessék a jövőre is gondolni.

 

HIGGINS

(türelmetlenül) És mi lesz vele, ha otthagyom a sárban? Erre feleljen, Pearce-né.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Az az ő dolga, nem a tanár úré!

 

HIGGINS

Nagyszerű! Hát ha befejeztem a tanítást, visszapottyantom a sárba: ez már megint az ő dolga lesz. Rendben van?

 

LIZA

Nincs magának szíve! Nem törődik senkivel, csakis magával! (Felkel és indul) Nekem ebbül elég vót, alásszolgája! (Az ajtónak tart) Röstellhetné magát, annyit mondok!

 

HIGGINS

(egy csokoládébonbont vesz fel a zongoráról, tekintete csintalanul megvillan) Parancsol egy kis csokoládét, Eliza?

 

LIZA

(megáll, mert erős a kísértés) Hunnan tudhassam én, mi van abba? Hallottam én má olyat, hogy a magukfajták megétették a szegény lányt.

 

HIGGINS

(előveszi bicskáját, kettévág egy bonbont, felét szájába veszi és szopogatni kezdi, másik felét pedig a lánynak kínálja) Tessék: hogy megnyugodjon... Én eszem az egyik felét, maga meg a másikat. (Eliza szóra nyitja száját, s Higgins hirtelen beledugja a bonbont) Kap minden napra egy egész dobozzal, egy egész szekérderékkal. Csokoládén fog élni! Nos?

 

LIZA

(aki megette a csokoládét, miután előbb majd megfullad tőle) Csak azé ettem meg, mer tudom, hogy finom lánynak nem illik köpni.

 

HIGGINS

Ide figyeljen, az előbb azt mondta, hogy taxin jött, igaz?

 

LIZA

Hát osztán? Tán nekem nem szabad taxira ülni éppúgy, mint másnak?

 

HIGGINS

Dehogynem szabad! Mától fogva annyiszor ül taxiba, ahányszor akar. Mindennap körbetaxizhatja az egész várost. Erre gondoljon!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

De, tanár úr, ne vigye őt a kísértésbe! A lánynak gondolnia kell a jövőjére!

 

HIGGINS

Ebben a korban?! Bolondság! Az ember ráér a jövőjére gondolni, mikor már nincs jövője. Nem, nem, Eliza, tegyen csak úgy, mint ez a tiszteletre méltó hölgy: mások jövőjével törődjön, ne a magáéval! Ne gondoljon másra, csak csokoládéra, taxira, aranyra, gyémántra!

 

LIZA

Nem kell nekem arany meg gyémánt! Én tisztességes lány vagyok! (Leül, és megpróbál méltóságteljes lenni)

 

HIGGINS

És Pearce-né felügyelete alatt az is marad. Azután majd férjhez megy egy mámorító bajuszkájú testőrtiszthez, egy valódi márki fiához, akit jó atyja kitagad, mert magát vette feleségül, de végül megengesztelődik, látva a maga megható szépségét és jóságát...

 

PICKERING

Bocsásson meg, Higgins, de közbe kell lépnem, Pearce-nének teljesen igaza van. Ha ez a lány hathavi próbatanulásra szerződik, akkor számot kell adnia önmagának arról, hogy ezzel mit cselekszik.

 

HIGGINS

De hogy adhatna számot? Hisz nem ért meg semmit a világon! Különben is: melyikünk tud számot adni arról, hogy mit cselekszik? Ha számot adnánk, nem is cselekednénk.

 

PICKERING

Ez nagyon elmés, Higgins, de nem tartozik a tárgyhoz. (Elizához) Kérem, Doolittle kisasszony...

 

LIZA

(óriási meglepetéssel) Ó-ó-ó-ó-ó! (Artikulálatlan hangokat ad ki)

 

HIGGINS

Na, tessék! Ennél többet nem szedhet ki belőle! Ó-ó-ó-ó-ó! (Utánozza a lány artikulálatlan hangjait) Kár itt magyarázni! Ezt ön, mint katona, legjobban tudhatná. Parancsolni kell neki - és kész. Eliza! Itt fog lakni hat hónapig, és megtanul beszélni olyan gyönyörűen, mint egy boltoskisasszony a virágüzletben. Ha jó lesz és mindenben engedelmeskedik, akkor lesz szép hálószobája, ehet, amennyi belefér, kap pénzt, hogy csokoládét vegyen és taxin kocsikázzon. De ha haszontalan lesz és lusta, akkor a fáskamrában fog hálni, s svábbogarak közt, és Pearce-né asszony seprűnyéllel fogja kiporolni. Hat hónap múlva hintóba ül, és teljes díszben elhajtat a Buckingham Palotába. Ha a király észreveszi, hogy nem született úrinő, nyakon csípi a rendőrség, elviszi a Towerba és leütik a fejét, intő példaképpen minden elvetemült virágáruslány számára. De ha a király nem vesz észre semmit, akkor kap tőlem ajándékba hét schilling hat pennyt, és megkezdheti karrierjét mint boltoskisasszony egy virágüzletben. Ha visszautasítja az ajánlatomat, akkor hálátlan gonosz lány, és minden angyal sírni fog a mennyországban. (Pickeringhez) Meg van velem elégedve, Pickering? (Pearce-néhez) Elég nyíltan és becsületesen beszéltem, kedves Pearce-né?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(türelmetlenül) Jobb lenne, ha hagyná, hogy négyszemközt rendesen beszéljek a lánnyal. Még nem is tudom, vállalhatom-e a gondját... beleegyezhetem-e ebbe az egészbe? Tudom én, hogy nem akar neki a tanár úr semmi rosszat, de ha egyszer valakinek a kiejtése megtetszik a tanár úrnak, akkor többet nem törődik se istennel, se emberrel! Jöjjön velem, Liza.

 

HIGGINS

Nagyon helyes, köszönöm Pearce-né. Toloncolja a fürdőszobába.

 

LIZA

(vonakodva és gyanakodva kel fel) Maga csak egy nagy hóhányó, annyit mondok! Ha nem akarok, nem maradok! Engem ugyan senki se fog kiporóni! Nem kívánkoztam én a Bökkingi Palotába soha ebbe a büdös életbe! De a rendőrséggel se vót bajom, nem bizony! Mer én tisztességes lány vagyok...

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Ne feleseljen vissza lányom! Nem érti maga a tanár urat. Jöjjön csak velem. (Kinyitja előtte az ajtót)

 

LIZA

(kifelé mentében) Igenis, úgy van, ahogy mondom! Dehogyis mék én a királyhó, hogy osztán leüssék a fejem! Ha én ezt tuttam vóna, mibe mászok bele, sose gyöttem vóna ide! Mer én tisztességes lány vótam világéletembe, nekem semmi beszédem vele, nem tartozok neki semmivel, fütyülök rá, engem ugyan ne taníccson, mer nekem is van érzelmem, igenis...

 

Az ajtó becsukódik mögötte, és elnyeli a hangját.

 

 

Pearce-né felviszi Elizát a harmadik emeletre, a lány legnagyobb meglepetésére: ő ugyanis azt hitte, a mosókonyhába kerül. Odafent Pearce-né kinyit egy ajtót, s betessékeli a lányt egy vendégszobába.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Magának itt a helye. Ez lesz a hálószobája.

 

LIZA

Jaj, nem tunnék itt megalunni, jóasszony! Nagyon puccos ez a magamfajtának. Egy frászba vónék, hogy hozzáérek valamihöz. Nem vagyok még hercegnő, tudhassa!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Magának is olyan tisztára kell mosdania, mint ez a szoba: akkor majd nem fél tőle. Engem pedig ne jóasszonynak szólítson, hanem asszonyomnak. (Kinyitja a fürdőszobává alakított öltözőszoba ajtaját)

 

LIZA

Azannya! Hát e' mi? Itt szokják mosni a ruhát? Micsoda muris nagy vájdling!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Ez nem vájdling, ebben mosdani szoktunk, lányom. Ebben fogom én magát mindjárt tisztára mosni.

 

LIZA

Csak nem képzeli, hogy belemászok, csupa víz lennék. Azt má nem! Bele is halnék! Vót arra mifelénk egy spiné, az minden szombaton ezt csináta, de el is patkót rövidúton.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Higgins tanár úrnak külön fürdőszobája van odalent, és minden reggel hideg fürdőt vesz.

 

LIZA

Vasbul van az a pacák!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Ha maga egy szobában akar tartózkodni a tanár úrral és az ezredes úrral, hogy tanuljon tőlük, akkor magának is fürödnie kell. Ha nem fürdik, nem fogják állni a szagát. De fürödhet olyan meleg vízben, amilyenben tetszik. Itt van két csap: hideg, meleg.

 

LIZA

(sírva) Köll is nekem! Kutyának való az! Bele is pusztulnék! Sose mártóztam én meg életemben tetőtül talpig.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Hát nem akar tiszta lenni, csinos, illatos, mint egy úrinő? Tanulja meg, hogy a lelke sem lehet tiszta az olyan lánynak, akinek a teste ragad a piszoktól.

 

LIZA

Brühühhü!!!!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Ne bőgjön, hanem menjen be a szobájába, és vessen le mindent. Azután bújjon bele ebbe (a fogasról egy fürdőköpenyt akaszt le, és a lány kezébe nyomja), és jöjjön vissza. Majd én elkészítem a fürdőt.

 

LIZA

(könnyek között) Ne, ne, ne!!! Nem vagyok én ahhoz szokva! Nem szokok én pucérra vetkőzni! Nem való az, tudhassa.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Bolond beszéd, gyermekem. Hát este tán nem vetkőzik le, mikor ágyba fekszik?

 

LIZA

(megbotránkozva) Má mér vetkőznék le? Bele is halnék. A szoknyámat, azt levetem, persze.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Hát csak nem hál abban az alsóruhában, amit napközben visel?

 

LIZA

Ugyan mi másba hálnék?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Hát ha itt marad, akkor ennek mától kezdve vége. Majd kap egy tiszta hálóinget.

 

LIZA

Csak nem képzeli, hogy hagyom a bőrömhöz érni azt a hideg vacakot, oszt fél éccaka didergek az ágyba?! A halálomat akarja?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Azt akarom, hogy mocskos nőszemélyből tiszta, rendes lány legyen, olyan, akit nyugodtan beereszthetek az urakhoz a dolgozószobába. Vagy rám bízza magát és szót fogad, vagy kipenderítjük, és mehet vissza a virágkosara mellé.

 

LIZA

Tuggya is maga, mi nekem a hideg! Magának arrul gőze sincs, hogy szokok én fázni!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Itt nem kell hideg ágyban hálnia: majd melegvizes palackot teszek az ágynemű közé. (Betuszkolja a hálószobába) Na egykettő, vetkőzni!

 

LIZA

Jaj, ha én azt tudom, milyen borzasztó a tisztaság, sose gyövök ide. Tuttam is én otthon, hogy mibe mászok bele! Hisz én...

 

Pearce-né belöki a hálóba, de az ajtót félig nyitva hagyja, nehogy foglya megszökjön.

 

Pearce-né fehér fürdőkesztyűt húz a kezére, és teleereszti vízzel a kádat, keverve a hideget a meleggel. Közben hőmérővel ellenőrzi az eredményt. Végül egy marok fürdősóval illatosítja a vizet, s még egy kis mustárlisztet is szór bele. Azután fogja a félelmetes, hosszú nyelű súrolókefét, s jó bőven megszappanozza. Eliza visszatér levetkőzve, de szorosan magára tekerve a fürdőköpenyt. Szánalmasan látni, hogy milyen veszettül fél.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Na, jöjjön ide. Vesse le ezt.

 

LIZA

Azt nem lehet, kérem! Azt igazán nem lehet! Olyat má mégse csinálok!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Bolond beszéd. Tessék: lépjen a kádba, és nézze meg, elég meleg-e a víz?

 

LIZA

Au! Au! Mint a tűz!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(lerántja róla a fürdőköpenyt, és hanyatt a kádba nyomja) Ne féljen, nem fog fájni. (Munkához lát a súrolókefével)

 

Liza szívettépően sivalkodik.

 

 

Ezalatt az ezredes nyíltan szót ért Higginsszel a lányról. Pickering a kandallótól előrejön a székhez, lovaglóülésben letelepszik, s a szék támlájára könyökölve, farkasszemet néz a tanárral.

 

PICKERING

Engedjen meg egy katonás kérdést, Higgins. Megbízható ember ön, ha nőkről van szó?

 

HIGGINS

(kedvesen) Látott már megbízható embert, ha nőkről van szó?

 

PICKERING

Hogyne! Akárhányat.

 

HIGGINS

(dogmatikusan, miután egy szökkenéssel felült a zongorára) Mert én nem láttam. Azt tapasztaltam, hogy mihelyt egy nő kapcsolatba kerül velem, féltékeny lesz, követelőző, gyanakvó - valóságos istencsapás. És mihelyt én kerülök kapcsolatba egy nővel, önző zsarnok leszek. A nő mindent felforgat. Aki beengedi az életébe, menten érzi, hogy ha ő jobbra húz, a nő balra húz, és ha ő balra húz, a nő jobbra húz.

 

PICKERING

De miért?

 

HIGGINS

(nyugtalanul leugrik a zongoráról) A jó isten tudja, miért! Nyilván a nő is a maga életét akarja élni, a férfi is. És mindegyik a maga útjára akarja rángatni a másikat. Az egyik északnak akar menni, a másik délnek, az eredmény az, hogy mind a ketten megindulnak keletnek, ahol semmi keresnivalójuk. (Leül a zongora padjára) Már én megrögzött agglegény vagyok, és nyilván az is maradok.

 

PICKERING

(felkel és megáll, fölébe hajolva) Ugyan, Higgins, ön jól tudja, miről beszélek. Ha én is részt veszek ebben a vállalkozásban, akkor felelősnek érzem magam a lányért. Remélem, egyetértünk abban, hogy nem szabad visszaélni a leány helyzetével?

 

HIGGINS

Ugyan már! Még hogy ezt a lányt!... Esküszöm, tabu lesz! (Felkel, hogy megmagyarázza) Nézze: tanítványom lesz, és tanítani nem is lehet másképp, csak ha a növendék tabu. Egy rakás amerikai milliomoslányt tanítottam beszélni, a világ legszebb nőit! Én már be vagyok oltva. Mintha csupa fatuskó volna, s mintha én is fából volnék, olyan ez, mint...

 

Pearce-né benyit, Eliza kalapját tartja kezében. Pickering visszatér a karosszékhez és beleül.

 

HIGGINS

(mohón) Nos, rendben van?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(az ajtóból) Csak épp egy szavam volna a tanár úrhoz, ha megengedi.

 

HIGGINS

Miért ne? Jöjjön be. (Pearce-né előrejön) Ezt ne égesse el, Pearce-né, eltesszük mint ritkaságot. (Elveszi tőle a kalapot)

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Csak tessék vigyázni! Meg kellett ígérnem, hogy ezt nem égetem el, pedig nem ártana egy kis tisztítótűzbe dugni.

 

HIGGINS

(hirtelen a zongorára téve) Nagyon köszönöm! Nos, mit akart mondani?

 

PICKERING

Nem zavarok?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Dehogyis, ezredes úr. Arra szeretném kérni a tanár urat, hogy mindig válogassa meg a szavait a lány előtt.

 

HIGGINS

(komoran) Ez természetes. Mindig meg szoktam válogatni a szavaimat. Mit akar ezzel?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Nem, a tanár úr egyáltalán nem szokta megválogatni a szavait, mikor nem talál valamit, vagy ha egy kicsit ideges. Nekem mindegy, én már megszoktam. De a lány előtt igazán nem volna szabad káromkodni.

 

HIGGINS

(méltatlankodva) Én káromkodom?! (Kirobban) Soha a büdös életben! Ki nem állhatom a káromkodást! Mi a nyavalyát akar ezzel mondani?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(egykedvűen) Csakis ezt, tanár úr. Nagyon sokat tetszik káromkodni. Éntőlem káromkodhat, cifrázhatja, hogy mi a nyavalyának, hol a nyavalyában, ki a nyavalya...

 

HIGGINS

Jól hallok, Pearce-né?! Ilyen szavak a maga ajkán?!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(nem hajlandó kizökkenni a kerékvágásból) ...de van egy bizonyos szó - nagyon kérem, hogy ezt ne használja. A lány kimondta az elébb felindulásában, amikor a kádba lépett. Ugyanolyan betűvel kezdődik mint a kád. Ő nem tehet róla, már az anyatejjel szívta magába ezt a szót, de nem szabad, hogy a tanár úr szájából hallja.

 

HIGGINS

(könnyedén) Igazán nem vádolhatom magam, hogy valaha is kimondtam azt a szót. (Pearce-né állhatatosan néz a szemébe, mire Higgins rossz lelkiismeretét fölénnyel takarva hozzáteszi,) Kivéve talán, ha néha nagyon izgatott voltam.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Csak éppen ma reggel, tanár úr. Háromszor mondta: kávéra, a kuglófra és a késre.

 

HIGGINS

Ó, az csak alliteráció volt, igazán érthető egy költői léleknél.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Már akárhogy is tetszik hívni, nagyon kérem, hogy a lány előtt ne tessék többet kimondani azt a szót.

 

HIGGINS

Helyes, helyes, van még valami?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Van, tanár úr. Ami a lány tisztálkodását meg a rendet illeti, nagyon résen kell lennünk.

 

HIGGINS

Hogyne, hogyne, okvetlenül, nagyon helyes.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Úgy értem, ne tűrje, hogy pongyolán járjon és szanaszét hagyja a holmiját.

 

HIGGINS

(ünnepélyesen hozzálép) Úgy van! Éppen erre akartam figyelmeztetni. (Pickeringhez fordul, aki nagy élvezettel hallgatja ezt a beszélgetést) Ezeken az apróságokon fordul meg minden. Fillérből lesz a tallér. Ez éppúgy érvényes az ember szokásaira, mint a pénzére. (Méltóságteljes pózban áll meg a kandalló sarkánál)

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Úgy van tanár úr. Megkérhetem akkor, hogy ne jöjjön le többet reggelizni slafrokban, vagy legalább ne használja szalvétának a slafrok ujját olyan rendszeresen, mint eddig. És ha lenne olyan kedves és nem enne minden fogást ugyanabból a tányérból, és nem tenné a használt leveseskanalat a tiszta abroszra, az mindenesetre nagyon jó példa volna a lánynak. Biztosan tetszik emlékezni, hogy a múltkor is majdnem meg tetszett fulladni attól a halszálkától, ami a gyümölcsízbe keveredett.

 

HIGGINS

(otthagyja a kandallót, és visszatér a zongorához) Lehet, hogy szórakozottságból megtörténik velem az ilyesmi néha, de semmi esetre sem szokásom. (Mérgesen) Egyébként a slafrokomnak kiállhatatlan benzinszaga van.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Természetesen, tanár úr, és ha a zsíros ujjait ezután is beletörli a...

 

HIGGINS

(túlkiabálja) Jó, jó ezután majd a hajamba fogom törülni!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Remélem, nem tetszett megsértődni, tanár úr?

 

HIGGINS

(meghökkenve, hogy róla valami barátságtalan érzelmet is fel lehet tételezni) Dehogy, dehogy! Teljesen igaza van, Pearce-né. Nagyon fogok vigyázni magamra a lány előtt. Van még valami?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Van, tanár úr. Nem adhatnék rá egyet azokból a japán kimonókból, amiket keletről tetszett hozni; igazán nem bújtathatom újra a régi rongyaiba.

 

HIGGINS

Nagyon helyes, adja rá, amelyiket tetszik. Van még valami?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Nincs, tanár úr. Köszönöm szépen. (Kimegy)

 

HIGGINS

Tudja, Pickering, hogy ennek a nőnek a legfantasztikusabb rögeszméi vannak rólam? Világéletemben félénk, szemérmes ember voltam. Sohasem éreztem magam igazi, félelmetes felnőttnek, mint a többi nagyokos. De Pearce-né szentül hiszi, hogy én valami erőszakos, basáskodó, zsarnok vagyok. Fogalmam sincs, honnan veszi!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(visszatér) Na, tanár úr, kérem már kezdődnek a bajok. Egy szemetesember van itt, valami Alfred Doolittle, beszélni akar a tanár úrral. Azt mondja, hogy itt van a lánya.

 

PICKERING

(fölkel) Hűha!

 

HIGGINS

(hirtelen) Küldje föl azt a betörőt!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Igenis tanár úr. (El)

 

PICKERING

Hátha nem is betörő?

 

HIGGINS

Bolond beszéd, persze hogy betörő!

 

PICKERING

Akár az, akár nem, attól tartok, meggyűlik vele a bajunk.

 

HIGGINS

(magabiztosan) Nem, nem, szó sincs róla! Előbb lesz neki baja velem, mint nekem ővele! És bizonyos, hogy kiszedünk belőle valami érdekeset.

 

PICKERING

A lányról?

 

HIGGINS

Dehogy! A kiejtésére gondolok.

 

PICKERING

Hja úgy!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(az ajtóban) Ez az a Doolittle! (Beengedi Doolittle-t, és az ajtóban eltűnik)

 

Alfred Doolittle meglett korú, de életerős szemetesember, foglalkozásának megfelelően öltözve. Fején a szemetesek sapkája, melynek hátsó leffentyűje betakarja nyakát és vállát. Jellegzetes, érdekes arca van, s láthatólag soha nem bántja sem a félelem, sem a lelkiismeret. Hangja színes és kifejező, annak eredményeképpen, hogy érzelmeit sohasem szokta véka alá rejteni. Jelenleg a sértett becsület és kemény elszántság pózát öltötte magára.

 

DOOLITTLE

(az ajtóban megáll, mert nem tudja még, hogy a két férfi közül melyik az ő embere) Higgins urat keresem.

 

HIGGINS

Én vagyok az. Jó reggelt, foglaljon helyet.

 

DOOLITTLE

Jó reggelt, direktor úr. (Méltóságteljesen leül) Igen nagy dologba gyöttem.

 

HIGGINS

(Pickeringhez) Hounslow-i születés. Az anyja walesi, ha nem tévedek. (Doolittle-nek a szája is tátva marad a csodálkozástól. Higgins Doolittle-hez fordul) Mit óhajt?

 

DOOLITTLE

(fenyegetően) A lányomat. Semmi mást. Teccik érteni?

 

HIGGINS

Hogyne. Maga az apja, ugye? Csak nem képzeli, hogy másnak is kell a lánya? Örülök, hogy nem halt még ki szívéből a családi érzés. Odafent van. Mindjárt magával viheti.

 

DOOLITTLE

(meghökkenve kel föl) Hogyhogy?

 

HIGGINS

Viheti. Azt hiszi, én fogom gondját viselni maga helyett?

 

DOOLITTLE

(méltatlankodva) Ejnye má, direktor úr! Hát igazság ez? Hát illik így kihasználni az embernek a helyzetit? Enyim a lány, de most magáhó kerűt. Mi közöm az egészhöz? (Újra leül)

 

HIGGINS

A maga lánya idemerészkedett, és megkért, hogy tanítsam meg rendesen beszélni, mert el akar helyezkedni egy virágüzletben. Ez az úr és a házvezetőnőm a tanúk erre. (Rátámad) Hogy mer idejönni és megzsarolni? Szántszándékkal küldte ide a lányt!

 

DOOLITTLE

(tiltakozva) Nem én, direktor úr!

 

HIGGINS

De igen! Különben honnan tudta volna, hogy itt van?

 

DOOLITTLE

Ne tessék má így lekapni, direktor úr.

 

HIGGINS

Majd lekapja magát a rendőrség! Egész banda, egész bűnszövetkezet! Így akarják kizsarolni az ember pénzét! Azonnal telefonálok a rendőrségre. (A telefonhoz siet, és felüti a telefonkönyvet)

 

DOOLITTLE

Kértem én csak egy fityinget is! Ezt az urat kérdem: szótam én csak egy árva-büdös szót is pénzrül?

 

HIGGINS

(félredobja a telefonkönyvet, és Doolittle felé tart, nekiszegezve a keresztkérdést) Hát akkor miért jött ide?

 

DOOLITTLE

(mézédesen) Uramisten! Hát mér gyön ide az ember? Legyen má emberséges, direktor úr!

 

HIGGINS

(lefegyverezve) Alfred, Alfred! Vallja be, hogy maga biztatta föl a lányát!

 

DOOLITTLE

Így görbűjjek meg, direktor úr! Ha kell, megesküszöm a bibliára, két hónapja színit se láttam annak a lánynak!

 

HIGGINS

Akkor honnan tudta, hogy itt van?

 

DOOLITTLE

(szívhez szólóan) Megmondom én, direktor úr, kérem, mihelyst egy percre szóhoz jutok. Mást se kívánok, csak hogy elmondhassam, egyetlen vágyam, hogy elmondhassam, égek a vágytul, hogy elmondhassam!

 

HIGGINS

Figyeli, Pickering, van valami istenadta szónoki véna ebben a fickóban. Hallgassa csak ezt az ősi ritmust: "Mást se kívánok, csak hogy elmondhassam, egyetlen vágyam, hogy elmondhassam, égek a vágytul, hogy elmondhassam!" Szentimentális retorika! Ez benne a walesi. Egyébként erre vall a hazudozás és a becstelenség is.

 

PICKERING

Kérem, Higgins, magam is walesi születésű vagyok. (Doolittle-hez) Honnan tudta, hogy a lánya itt van, ha nem maga küldte ide?

 

DOOLITTLE

Az úgy vót, direktor úr, kérem, hogy Liza egy gyereket beűtetett a taxiba, hogy megkocsikáztassa, a háziasszonyának a gyerekit. Az asszitte, hogy maj haza is autón mehet. De hát Liza hazaszalasztotta a cuccáért, mikor hallotta, hogy a naccságos úr itt akarja fogni. Az Endell ucca sarkán láttam meg a kölköt...

 

HIGGINS

A kocsmából?

 

DOOLITTLE

Szegény embernek kocsma a klubja, direktor úr!

 

PICKERING

Engedjük beszélni Higgins!

 

DOOLITTLE

Eccóval mongya a gyerek, hogy mi van. Asz kérdem, uram, mit tesz ilyenkor egy apa? Mondom a gyereknek: a cuccát, azt idehozod nekem, mert mondom...

 

PICKERING

Mért nem ment el érte maga?

 

DOOLITTLE

Az asszonya nem bízta vóna rám a holmit, kérem. Mer, teccik tudni, az olyan háklis asszony. Annak a büdös kölöknek is egy pennyt kellett adnom, hogy megkapjam. Azér gyöttem, hogy elhozzam a motyóját, hogy kedvire tegyek az uraknak. Nohát!

 

HIGGINS

Mi az a motyó?

 

DOOLITTLE

Egy harmonika, meg képek, meg mindenféle gyöngyvacakok, meg még egy madárkalicka. Aszt üzente, hogy ruha semmi nem kell. Hát mit gondóhattam én ebbül, naccságos úr, kérem? Ezt úgy kérdem mint apa: mit gondóhattam én ebbül?

 

HIGGINS

Tehát azért jött, hogy megmentse a lányát attól, ami rosszabb a halálnál - igaz?

 

DOOLITTLE

(földerül, hogy ilyen jól megértették) Ahogy mondani teccik! Számbul vette ki a szót, direktor úr.

 

PICKERING

De mért hozta ide a holmiját, ha az volt a szándéka, hogy elviszi a lányt?

 

DOOLITTLE

Mondtam én egy szóval is, hogy el akarom vinni? Ki akarja elvinni?

 

HIGGINS

(határozottan) El fogja vinni, mégpedig azonnal. (A kandallóhoz lép és csenget)

 

DOOLITTLE

(felkel) De direktor úr! Ne tessék mán ilyet mondani. Csak nem állok úttyába az édeslányom boldogságának?! Mos, mikor megcsináhattya a szerencséjit, hiszen az elébb teccett mondani...

 

Pearce-né megjelenik az ajtóban, parancsra várva.

 

HIGGINS

Ez itt Eliza apja, a lányáért jött. Adja át neki. (Visszatér a zongorához, olyan ábrázattal, mintha azt mondaná: "Mosom kezeimet.")

 

DOOLITTLE

De kérem szépen, itt valami félreértés van, tessék má rám hallgatni...

 

PEARCE-NÉ

De nem viheti el - így nem -, az elébb mondta, hogy égessem el minden ruháját.

 

DOOLITTLE

Nohát akkor! Csak nem viszem ki az uccára anyaszült meztelenül! Lelkire venné?

 

HIGGINS

Azt mondta, hogy a lányáért jött. Vigye a lányát! Ha nincs ruhája, vegyen neki.

 

DOOLITTLE

(elkeseredve) Hol a ruhája, amibe idegyött? Én égettem el, vagy a kedves felesége?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Házvezetőnő vagyok, kérem szépen. Már küldtem a boltba új ruhákért, mihelyt megérkeznek, viheti a lányát, addig leülhet a konyhában. Erre tessék.

 

DOOLITTLE

(nagy zavarban követi egész az ajtóig, s ott némi tusakodás után, bizalmasan Higginshez fordul) Hallgasson ide, direktor úr, férfiemberek vagyunk mind a ketten - igaz?

 

HIGGINS

Ahá! Férfiemberek? Pearce-né kedves, jobb lesz, ha magunkra hagy.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Én is azt hiszem tanár úr. (Méltósággal elvonul)

 

PICKERING

Magáé a szó, Doolittle.

 

DOOLITTLE

(Pickeringhez) Köszönöm, uram. (Higginshez fordul, aki a zongora padja mögé menekül látogatója elől, mert Doolittle szaga nagyon is elárulja mesterségét) Megmondom én úgy, ahogy van, igencsak megszerettem én a direktor urat! Hát ha kedve van a lányhoz, én nem akadékoskodok. Velem lehet beszélni. Mer ami a női személyit illeti, igen rendes, gusztusos lány, de mint gyerek, nem éri meg a kosztját se. Teccik látni, becsületes ember vagyok. Én csak az apai jogomhoz ragaszkodok: tudom én, hogy a direktor úrnak esze ágában sincs, hogy ingyenbe kívánja tűlem a lányom. Látom én, hogy a direktor úr is becsületes ember. Mi vóna, ha öt fontot kigombóna? Mi az az öt font egy szegény apának? (Ismét leül, nagy megelégedéssel)

 

PICKERING

Azt hiszem, Doolittle, önnek is tudnia kellene, hogy Higgins tanár úr szándéka minden tekintetben tisztességes.

 

DOOLITTLE

Hát hogyne vóna tisztességes! Ha nem vóna az, ötven fontot kérnék.

 

HIGGINS

(felháborodva) Ötven fontért eladná a tulajdon lányát?!

 

DOOLITTLE

Isten mencs! Akárkinek nem, de hát mit meg nem tennék egy olyan úr kedvire, mint a direktor úr!

 

PICKERING

Nincs magában egy csepp erkölcsi érzék sem?!

 

DOOLITTLE

(minden szégyenkezés nélkül) Nem vagyok abba a helyzetbe, kérem. Az úrba se vóna, ha olyan rosszul állna, mint én. Nem akarok én rosszat senkinek se, de hát ha Liza jól jár, mér járjak én rosszul?

 

HIGGINS

(izgatottan) Tanácstalan vagyok, Pickering. Semmi kétség, hogy erkölcsileg nézve valóságos bűn csak egy fityinget is adni ennek az alaknak, mégis úgy érzem, van a követelésében valami kíméletlen igazság.

 

DOOLITTLE

Ez az, direktor úr! Én is csak ezt mondom. Az apai szív beszél belőlem.

 

PICKERING

Megértem, a zavarát, de attól tartok, mégsem volna helyes.

 

DOOLITTLE

Ne tessék mán ezt mondani! Ne így tessék ezt nézni! Mer mi vagyok én kérem, uraim? Azt kérdem, mi vagyok? Csak olyan lógós szegényember. Teccik tunni, mit jelent ez? Azt, kérem, hogy az embernek mindig baja van az úri tisztességgel. Mer valahányszor úgy láccik, hogy no most leesik nekem is valamicske, mindig azt vágják a fejemhöz: "Maga olyan lógós ember, maga mennyen innen." De mikor nekem éppúgy kéne a segiccség, mint annak a szentfazék özvegynek, aki egy halott férj után hat helyrül húzza a segélyt! Nekem nemhogy kevesebb kéne, nekem még több is kell, mint a jámbor szegényeknek. Én is éppúgy eszek, mint ők, inni meg még többet is iszok. Meg osztán kell egy kis szórakozás is az embernek, ha nem olyan buta; kell egy kis feledkezés, mikor úgy elkámpicsorodik a kedve. Osztán nekem is csak éppolyan árat szoknak szabni mindenütt, mint a jámbor szegényeknek. Mire jó az úri tisztesség? Csak arra, hogy nekem ne kellessen anni semmit. Maguk úriemberek: csak azt kérem maguktól, hogy semmi színház! Én is világosan beszélek, nem adom az ártatlant. Lógós ember vagyok - kész! Az is akarok maranni! ilyen a gusztusom, ez az igazság! De most aztán ne akarjanak ebbül hasznot húzni, hogy mos maj kisemmiznek a lányombul, mer őtet én neveltem, én kosztoltam, én ruháztam "orcám verítékével", kérem - tuggyák maguk, mennyit strapáltam én magam, amíg az a lány olyan szép nagyra megnőtt, hogy két ilyen úrnak is megakadt a szeme rajta! Hát sok érte az az öt font?! Maguktól kérdem: maguk döncsék el - igaz lelkükre!

 

HIGGINS

(fölkel és Pickeringhez megy) Azt mondom, Pickering, ha ezt az embert három hónapra kezelésbe vennénk, nyugodtan elmehetne miniszternek, vagy egyházi szónoknak!

 

PICKERING

Mit szól ehhez, Doolittle?

 

DOOLITTLE

Köszönöm szépen, naccságos úr, nem élek vele. Hallgattam én mán annyi prédikátort meg miniszterelnököt - mer én gondolkozós ember vagyok, engem a politika meg a vallás, meg a szocializmus, meg minden ilyen jó história érdekel - de elmondhatom maguknak, kutyának való élet az! Én mán csak megmaradok lógós szegényembernek. Akárhogy nézem én a mindenféle más pályákat - hát szóval, nincsen nekem gusztusom egyikhöz se!

 

HIGGINS

Azt hiszem, meg kell adnunk az ötöst.

 

PICKERING

Attól tartok rosszul fogja felhasználni.

 

DOOLITTLE

Istenbizony nem, naccságos úr! Attul ne tessék féni, hogy ülök rajta, takargatom, szedem a kamattyát, csak hogy lustálkodhassak, mint a disznó. Hétfőre ebbül egy garas se marad: mehetek dógozni, mintha sose is lett vóna. Mérget vehetnek rá, hogy ezen az öt fonton nem csúszok el! Csinálunk egy jó ramazurit a mamával, magunk kedvire, mások hasznára, maguk meg elmondhassák, hogy "nem dobtuk ki a pénzt az ablakon" - mer én mondom, enné jobb helyre nem is tehetik!

 

HIGGINS

(előveszi pénztárcáját, és előrejön Doolittle és a zongora közé) Leteszem a fegyvert. Adjunk neki tízet! (Két bankót nyújt Doolittle-nek)

 

DOOLITTLE

Azt má nem, direktor úr! A mamát nem vinné rá a lélek, hogy tíz fontot elverjen - de még engem se. Tíz font, az mán komoly dohány, azzal mán nem lehet viccelni. Mán pedig akkor lőttek az én boldogságomnak. Tessék csak annyit anni, amennyit kértem: se többet, se kevesebbet.

 

PICKERING

Mér nem veszi el feleségül azt a mamát - vagy hogy hívják...? Nem szívesen támogatom az efféle erkölcstelenséget.

 

DOOLITTLE

Tessék megmondani neki, uram! Így tessék megmondani neki! Én benne vagyok, kérem. Mer ennek az egésznek én iszom a levit. De micsinájjak, ha nem bírok vele? Így osztán bezzeg táncóhatok körülötte, kenhetem pénzzel, dugdoshatom ajándékkal! Annyi ruhát veszek neki, hogy az mán vétek. A kiskutyája vagyok mán neki, csak azé, mert nem vagyok az ura. Csakhogy eztet ő is tudja ám! Jaj, csak rá teccene venni, hogy esküggyön meg velem! Adok egy jó tanácsot, uram: vegye el Lizát ammig ilyen fiatal, ammig meg nem gyön neki a jobbik esze. Ha most nem veszi el, igencsak megbánnya későbben. De ha elveszi, akkor maj Liza bánnya meg. Inkább bánnya meg ő, min maga, aszondom, mer maga mégiscsak férfi, Liza meg - ugyi - csak nő, osztán hát egy nő, az uccse tudhassa, mi a boldogság.

 

HIGGINS

Pickering! Ha még egy percig hallgatjuk ezt az embert, egész erkölcsi bázisunk meginog. (Doolittle-hez) Öt fontot mondott, ugye?

 

DOOLITTLE

Köszönöm szépen, direktor úr.

 

HIGGINS

Bizonyos, hogy nem akar tízet?

 

DOOLITTLE

Mos nem. Hónap is nap lesz.

 

HIGGINS

(egy ötfontos bankót ad át) Tessék.

 

DOOLITTLE

Köszönöm, direktor úr. Minden jót! (Siet az ajtó felé: szeretne mielőbb kint lenni a zsákmányával. Amint kinyitja az ajtót, egy takaros, tiszta fiatal japán hölggyel találja magát szemközt, aki fehér jázminvirágocskákkal tarkázott kék kimonót visel. Mellette Pearce-né áll. Doolittle nagy mentegetőzve áll félre) Bocsánat, kisasszony.

 

LIZA

Mi a franc! Má a saját lányát se ismeri meg?

 

DOOLITTLE

Affenét! Hisz ez Eliza!

 

HIGGINS

Hát ez mi?!

 

PICKERING

Teringettét!

 

Mindhárman egyszerre kiáltanak fel.

 

LIZA

Nagyon figurás vagyok?

 

HIGGINS

Figurás?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(az ajtóban) Kérem tanár úr, ne mondjon semmi olyat, amitől a lány elbízhatja magát.

 

HIGGINS

Nagyon helyes megjegyzés! (Elizához) Igen: fene figurás.

 

PEARCE-NÉ

Kérem, tanár úr!

 

HIGGINS

(helyesbíti szavait) Úgy értettem, hogy felettébb figurás.

 

LIZA

Maj mingyá jobb lesz ezzel a kalappal, ni! (Fölteszi kalapját, és előkelően végigsétál a szobán)

 

HIGGINS

A legújabb divat! Minden új divat förtelmes.

 

DOOLITTLE

(apai büszkeséggel) No hát esse hittem vóna, hogy ilyen szép puccos lesz, ha kimosdassák! Becsületemre válik, igaz-e?

 

LIZA

No hát annyit mondhatok, így nem nagy vicc tisztálkonni. Hideg víz, meleg víz, amennyi csak teccik... Bolyhos törülközők, amennyi csak teccik... Még törülköző-melegítő is van, olyan, fóró, hogy el kelletett kapni az újam. Meg klassz puha kefék, hogy lesikájja az ember, ahun retkes... A szappantartó meg olyan szagos, akár a kankalin. Mosmá tudom mitül olyan tiszták az úrinők. Csupa öröm nekik a mosakodás. Látnák csak, milyen rohatt nehéz nekünk otthun!

 

HIGGINS

Örülök, hogy a fürdőszoba megnyerte tetszését.

 

LIZA

Nem mindenestül. Én megmondom, úgy, ahogy van... Akárki meghallhassa... Pearce-nének is megmondtam.

 

HIGGINS

Mi baj volt, Pearce-né, kérem?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(szelíden) Ó semmi, semmi... Nem fontos, tanár úr.

 

LIZA

Legszívesebben összetörtem vóna! Asse tudtam, hova nézzek. De rá is akasztottam egy törülközőt.

 

HIGGINS

Mire?

 

PEARCE-NÉ

A tükörre, tanár úr.

 

HIGGINS

Doolittle! Nagyon is szigorúan nevelte a lányát.

 

DOOLITTLE

Én? De hisz egyátajján nem is neveltem. Legföljebb ha néha meglegyintettem a nadrágszíjjal. Ne tessék rám kenni, én ártatlan vagyok. Nincs még hozzászokva, kérem, ennyi az egész. Maj meglássa, milyen hamar ráragad a maguk snájdig modora.

 

LIZA

Én tisztességes lány vagyok. Énrám ne ragaggyon semmi.

 

HIGGINS

Eliza! Ha még egyszer elmondja, hogy maga tisztességes lány, a papája már viszi is innen.

 

LIZA

Szeretem a hajnalt. Úgy láccik, nem ismeri az öreget. Azér gyött csak, hogy megvágja magukat, oszt beszophasson.

 

DOOLITTLE

Hát mi másra kéne a péz? Tán hogy a templomi perselybe hajigájjam? (Eliza kiölti rá a nyelvét. Doolittle ezen úgy felfortyan, hogy Pickering jónak látja közébük állni) Ne merj pofázni! Ha meghallom, hogy az urakkal is pofázni mersz, hát úgy meghirigellek, hogy arrul kódulsz! Megértetted?

 

HIGGINS

Vannak még további atyai intelmei, mielőtt elköszön? Óhajtja talán áldását adni?

 

DOOLITTLE

Azt mán nem. Nem ettem meszet, hogy mindenre kitaniccsam, amit a magam kárán megtanútam. Így is van vele épp elég bajom. Hát ha azt akarja, hogy Liza tisztességet, finomságot tanujjon: csak elő a nadrágszíjjat! No, minden jót!

 

HIGGINS

(nyomatékkal) Megálljon csak! Maga rendszeresen el fog járni a lányához. Ez kötelessége, érti? A bátyám lelkész: majd ő is segít a nevelésben.

 

DOOLITTLE

(kitérőleg) Mindenesetre, kérem. Maj benézek. Nem éppen most a héten, mer most éppen messze dógozok... de maj későbben... szóval maj még... maj csak összegyövünk... Alászolgálja. Viszon'látásra. (Megböki kalapját Pearce-né felé, de az rá se hederítve, gőggel távozik. Doolittle cinkosan Higginsre kacsint - mint olyan emberre, aki szintén nyögi Pearce-né nehéz természetét -, azután az asszony nyomában távozik)

 

LIZA

Nagy hantás az öreg, ne higgyen neki! Jobban fél az egy paptul, mint a veszett kutyátul. Egyhama nem lássa újra.

 

HIGGINS

Nem is akarom, Eliza. Maga tán akarja?

 

LIZA

Akkor lássam, mikor a hátam közepit! Csak bajra van nekem: szemetet szed, ahelyett, hogy végezné a mesterségit.

 

PICKERING

Mi a mestersége, Eliza?

 

LIZA

Abba nagy mester, hogy megvágja a pénzes pasasokat. Csatornatisztító vóna; néha el is szok menni melózni, hogy egy kicsit mozogjon, akkor aztán keres is nagy pénzeket. Hát eztán má nem hí Doolittle kisasszonynak?

 

PICKERING

Bocsánat, Doolittle kisasszony, csak nyelvbotlás volt.

 

LIZA

Nem baj, no csak tuggya, olyan jól hangzott. Irtóra szeretnék most beűni egy taxiba! Elhajtatnék arra mifelénk, kiszánék, a sofőrnek meg aszondanám, hogy várjon egy kicsit... Csak azér, tuggya, hogy a lányokat egye a penész! Szóba se állnék velük, tuggya.

 

PICKERING

Inkább várja meg, míg kap valami divatos ruhát.

 

HIGGINS

Különben sem volna szép, ha hátat fordítana régi barátainak most, mikor följebb került. Ezt hívjuk mi sznobizmusnak.

 

LIZA

Csak nem hiszi, hogy azok barátaim. Ha tehették, mindig kiröhögtek. Most hadd pukkadjanak, visszaadom a kőccsönt. De ha divatos ruhát kapok, azt megvárom. Az csuda klassz lesz. Pearce-né aszongya, hogy még éccakára is kapok külön ruhát. Pedig hát az kidobott péz, mer azt uccse lássa senki. Télen meg föl se veszem éccakára azt a hideg ruhát - azt má nem!

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(visszatér) Jöjjön, Eliza, lehet próbálni az új ruhát!

 

LIZA

Hu-hu-u-u-u-u! (Artikulálatlan hangot adva kirohan)

 

PEARCE-NÉ

(követi) Ne rohanjon úgy! (Becsukja maga mögött az ajtót)

 

HIGGINS

No, Pickering, nagy koloncot vettünk a nyakunkba.

 

PICKERING

(komolyan) Csatlakozom az előttem szólóhoz.

 

 

Bizonyára kíváncsiak, hogyan tanítja Higgins Elizát. Íme például az első lecke:

Új ruhában látjuk Elizát, akit teljesen kizökkentett a régi kerékvágásból a tegnapi ebéd, vacsora s a mai reggeli. Ilyesmit eddig elképzelni sem tudott. Most a dolgozószobában ül Higginsszel és az ezredessel, s úgy érzi magát, mint egy új beteg a kórházban, az első orvosi vizsgálat alkalmával. Higgins, aki alkatilag képtelen rá, hogy nyugodtan megüljön egy helyben, még jobban megzavarja a lányt, ahogy izgatottan körbejár. Ha nem volna ott barátja, az ezredes, a maga megnyugtató lényével, Eliza, akár élete árán is, hanyatt-homlok menekülne vissza a Külső Drury útra.

 

HIGGINS

Halljuk az ábécét!

 

LIZA

Még hogy az ábécét! Assziszi, még asse tudom? Ne ugy taniccson, mint valami dedóst.

 

HIGGINS

(mennydörög) Halljuk az ábécét!

 

PICKERING

Tessék csak mondani, Doolittle kisasszony. Mindjárt meg fogja érteni, miről van szó. Fogadjon csak szót a barátomnak. Engedje, hogy a maga módját tanítsa.

 

LIZA

Hát ha olyan nagyon akarják: a, bö, cö, dö...

 

HIGGINS

(úgy hördül fel, mint egy sebzett oroszlán) Állj! Hallja ezt, Pickering? S még adóztatnak bennünket elemi iskolai oktatás címén! Ezt a szerencsétlen állatot kilenc évre bebörtönözték az iskolába a mi költségünkre, hogy megtanítsák beszélni, írni Shakespeare és Milton nyelvén! S itt az eredmény: "a, bö, cö, dö!" (Elizához) Mondja: á, bé, cé, dé.

 

LIZA

(majdnem sír) Mondtam má: a, bö, cö...

 

HIGGINS

Elég! Mondja ezt: egy csésze kakaó.

 

LIZA

Eccsésze kakajó.

 

HIGGINS

Támassza előbb nyelve hegyét a szájpadláshoz, azután vigye előre a fogsorokig. Mondja: egy - csésze.

 

LIZA

Ee... nem megy. Egy - csésze.

 

PICKERING

Bravó! Nagyszerű volt, Doolittle kisasszony!

 

HIGGINS

Jupiterre mondom, telibe találta! Pickering! Hercegnőt faragunk belőle! Meg merné próbálni azt is: kakaó? De nem kakajó, érti? Ha még egyszer összevissza lefetyel, hajánál fogva vonszolom körül a szobán, háromszor egymás után! (Fortisszimóban) Kakaó!

 

LIZA

(sírva) Nem hallok én ebbe semmi különbséget, csak éppen hogy sokkal urassabb, mikó maga mongya.

 

HIGGINS

Hát ha nem hall semmi különbséget, akkor mi a nyavalyának bőg miatta? Pickering, adjon neki csokoládét.

 

PICKERING

Ugyan, ugyan, katonadolog, Doolittle kisasszony. Nagyon szépen halad. És legyen nyugodt, nem fog fájni semmi. Ígérem, hogy nem fogja a barátom a hajánál fogva körbevonszolni.

 

HIGGINS

Most menjen le Pearce-néhez: próbálja ki, amit tanult. És gondolkozzék rajta. Próbálgassa magától is. És vigyázzon, hogy a nyelve mikor érintkezik a fogsorral, ne engedje összevissza kalimpálni. A következő lecke délután fél ötkor. Elmehet.

 

Eliza még mindig hüppögve kiszalad a szobából.

 

Ezt az iskolát járja szegény Eliza hónapokon keresztül, míg viszont nem látjuk a londoni jó társaságban.

 

 

 

HARMADIK FELVONÁS

 

Higginsné fogadónapját tartja. Még egy vendég sem érkezett. A Chelsea rakparton levő lakás szalonjának három ablaka van, s ezek a folyóra néznek. A szoba nem olyan magas, mint hasonló igényű, de régebben épült házakban lenni szokott. A nyitott ablakon át egy erkélyre látni. Az erkélyen cserépben virágok. Ha arccal az ablakok felé állunk, balra van a kandalló, jobbra az ajtó, közel az ablak melletti sarokhoz. Higginsné Morris és Burne Jones ízlésének tiszteletében nőtt fel. Szobája cseppet sem hasonlít fiának Wimpole utcai lakásához, nincs telerakva bútorokkal, asztalkákkal stb. A szoba közepén hatalmas ottomán, mely a szőnyeggel, a Morris-féle tapétákkal és Morris-féle bútorkreton függönyökkel, a brokát díványtakaróval és díványpárnákkal együtt épp elég ékessége a szobának. Minden egyéb csecsebecse felesleges volna. A falakon néhány jó olajfestmény a Grosvenor Gallery harminc évvel ezelőtti kiállításairól, Burne Jones, nem pedig Whistler modorában. Az egyetlen tájkép egy rubensi méretű Cecil Lawson. Látható még a falon Higginsnének egy fiatalkori arcképe - csodálatos Rossetti-szerű kosztümben -, abból a korából, mikor még fittyet hányt a divatnak. (Az efféle viselet vezetett később - holmi kontárok garázdálkodása miatt - a múlt század hetvenes éveiben elharapózott "esztéticizmus" lehetetlen maskaráihoz.)

 

A sarokban, az ajtónak rézsút ül Higginsné, aki már túl van a hatvanon, és azon is, hogy hetykén dacoljon a divattal. Egyszerű, de finom íróasztalnál ül és ír. Ha kezét kinyújtja, eléri a csengő gombját. Hátrább a szobában egy Chippendale-szék. A szoba másik felében egy nyers faragású Erzsébet-kori szék, Inigo Jones stílusában. Ugyanezen az oldalon díszes faragású zongora. A kandalló és az ablak között sarokban egy dívány, Morris-féle bútorkretonnal bevonva.

 

Délután négy és öt óra között.

 

Kicsapódik az ajtó, s berobog Henry, kalappal a fején.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(elborzadva) Henry! (Zsémbesen) Mit keresel te ma itt? Tudod, hogy fogadónapom van. Megígérted, hogy ilyenkor nem jössz. (Amint Henry lehajol, hogy megcsókolja, Higginsné leveszi fia fejéről a kalapot, és a kezébe adja)

 

HIGGINS

Eh... (Az asztalra dobja a kalapot)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Azonnal menj haza.

 

HIGGINS

(megcsókolja) Tudom, mama. Szándékosan jöttem mégis ma.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

De én megtiltom! Komolyan beszélek, Henry. Minden barátomat halálra sérted. Ha veled találkoznak, többet felém se néznek.

 

HIGGINS

Dehogynem! Nem sokszor nyitom ki a szám, de ezt senki se bánja. (Leül)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nem sokszor nyitod ki a szád? De hát mikor kinyitod! Nem, nem, édes fiam, nem maradhatsz.

 

HIGGINS

De maradok. Dolgom van veled. Fonetikai ügy.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Hiába, fiam. Nagyon sajnálom, de képtelen vagyok megbirkózni a te extra magánhangzóiddal. És akárhogy örülök is a saját találmányú gyorsírással írott gyönyörű lapjaidnak, mégis végtelenül hálás vagyok, hogy rendes írással mellékeled a megfejtést: különben egy árva szót sem értenék az egészből.

 

HIGGINS

Jó, jó, de most nem fonetikáról van szó.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Az elébb mondtad, hogy fonetikai ügy.

 

HIGGINS

Számomra. De számodra nem. Fogtam egy lányt.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Úgy értsem, hogy téged fogott meg egy lány?

 

HIGGINS

Szó sincs róla. Ez nem nőügy.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Milyen kár.

 

HIGGINS

Miért?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Téged a negyvenötön aluli nők mind hidegen hagynak. Mikor fogsz már rájönni, hogy csinos fiatal nők is vannak a világon?

 

HIGGINS

Nem érek rá fiatal nőkkel vesződni. Az én ideálom egy olyasféle nő, mint te vagy. Sose leszek képes komolyan szeretni fiatal nőt. Ezen reménytelen is változtatni: túl mélyen gyökerezik bennem. (Hirtelen fölkel és sétálni kezd, kulcsait és aprópénzét csörgetve a zsebében) Különben is mind buták.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Tudod, mit tennél, fiam, ha csakugyan szeretnél?

 

HIGGINS

Tudom: megházasodnám. Eh...

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nem. Abbahagynád ezt a csörömpölést, és kivennéd a kezed a zsebedből.

 

HIGGINS

(reménytelenül legyintve engedelmeskedik, és újra leül)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Így tesz egy jó gyerek. Most beszélj a lányról.

 

HIGGINS

Mindjárt itt lesz.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nem emlékszem, hogy meghívtam volna.

 

HIGGINS

Nem te hívtad meg. Én szóltam neki. Ha ismernéd, te nem hívtad volna meg.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Csakugyan? Miért nem?

 

HIGGINS

Röviden: közönséges virágáruslány. Az utcasarkon szedtem fel.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

És meghívtad a fogadónapomra!

 

HIGGINS

(felkel, anyjához megy és megsimogatja) Ne félj, mama, minden rendben lesz. Tökéletes kiejtésre tanítottam, és elláttam szigorú utasításokkal, hogy viselje magát. Csak két témára szabad szorítkoznia: az időjárásra, és a többiek egészségi állapotára. "Szép időnk van" és "hogy érzi magát" - pont. Veszélyesebb vizekre evezni tilos. Egyszóval nem lesz semmi baj!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Semmi baj?! Ha az egészségi állapotunkról beszél? A belső részeinkről! Vagy pláne a külsőnkről! Henry, hogy lehettél ilyen őrült?!

 

HIGGINS

Hát valamiről csak kell neki beszélni! (Észbe kap és újra leül) Mondom, minden rendben lesz; csak ne fájjon a fejed! Pickering is benne van. Fogadtam vele, hogy hat hónap múlva úgy mutathatom be a lányt a társaságban, mint hercegnőt. Néhány hónapja vettem munkába, de olyan iramban halad, mint egy versenyló. Meg fogom nyerni a fogadást. Kitűnő füle van, és tanulékonyabbnak bizonyult, mint a polgári növendékeim, mert neki tökéletesen új nyelvet kellett megtanulnia. Már majdnem úgy beszél angolul, mint te franciául.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ez tökéletesen elég!

 

HIGGINS

Elég is, meg nem is.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Mit akarsz ezzel mondani?

 

HIGGINS

A kiejtését tökéletesen rendbe hoztam, de hát nemcsak az a kérdés, hogy ejti ki egy lány a szavakat, hanem az is, hogy milyen szavakat ejt ki a száján... S éppen az a bökkenő, hogy...

 

SZOBALÁNY

(a szobalány szakítja őket félbe, vendégeket jelentve be) Eynsford Hillné őnagysága és leánya. (Távozik)

 

HIGGINS

Szent isten! (Felugrik, felkapja kalapját az asztalról, s az ajtó felé menekülne, de még mielőtt kijutna, az anyja már be is mutatta)

 

Eynsford Hillné és leánya az a két hölgy, akik néhány hónappal ezelőtt a Szent Pál-templom oszlopcsarnoka alá menekültek az eső elől. Az anya jól táplált, nyugodt, de megvannak benne a korlátozott anyagi viszonyok között élő emberek szokásos gátlásai. A lány viselkedése kedélyes, állandóan érezhető rajta a társasági máz. Egy "fenn az ernyő, nincsen kas"-familia tipikus sarja.

 

CLARA

(Higginsnéhez) Jó napot kívánok. (Kezet fognak)

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Jó napot kívánok. (Szintén kezet fog Higginsnével)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(bemutatja fiát) Fiam, Henry.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Á, a híres fia! Már oly régen szerettem volna megismerkedni professzor úrral.

 

HIGGINS

(morcosan, egy mozdulatot sem téve feléje, a zongora felé hátrál, és gyorsan meghajol) Örvendek.

 

CLARA

(bizalmaskodó könnyedséggel megy feléje) Á, jó estét kívánok.

 

HIGGINS

(arcába bámul) Magát már láttam valahol. Fogalmam sincs róla, hol... Hallottam már a hangját. (Komoran) De nem fontos! Mért nem ül le?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Sajnálom, de meg kell mondanom: az én híres fiamnak fogalma sincs a jó modorról. Kérem, nézzék el neki!

 

CLARA

(kedélyesen) Én elnézem. (Leül az Erzsébet-kori székbe)

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(kissé megrökönyödve) Hogyne, hogyne! (Leül az ottománra, leánya és Higginsné közé, aki székét íróasztalánál feléjük fordította)

 

HIGGINS

Modortalan voltam? Pedig eszem ágában sem volt. (A középső ablakhoz lép, s a társaságnak hátat fordítva kibámul a folyóra meg a túlsó parti Battersea park virágaira, olyan ábrázattal, mintha valami jeges pusztaságot látna)

 

SZOBALÁNY

(ismét belép) Pickering ezredes úr. (Távozik)

 

PICKERING

Jó estét kívánok, asszonyom.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Örülök, hogy eljött. Nem tudom, ismerik-e egymást? Eynsford Hillné és leánya, Clara.

 

Kölcsönös meghajlások, az ezredes a Chippendale-széket kissé előbbre húzza, a két idősebb hölgy közé.

 

PICKERING

Mondta már Henry, hogy miért jöttünk?

 

HIGGINS

(csak fejével fordul hátra) Akkor szakítottak félbe! Vinné el az ördög!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Henry, Henry! Nagyon kérlek!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Talán nem jókor jöttünk?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(feláll és visszanyomja) Dehogynem, dehogynem. Jobbkor nem is jöhettek volna, be akarjuk mutatni egy kedves ismerősünket.

 

HIGGINS

(megfordul, és hirtelen remény csillan fel szemében) Az ám! Két vagy három emberre van szükségünk. Mindegy, hogy ki... maguk is jók lesznek.

 

SZOBALÁNY

(visszatér és Freddyt jelenti be) Eynsford Hill úr!

 

HIGGINS

(türelmét vesztve, elég hangosan szólja el magát) Úristen, még egy!

 

FREDDY

(Higginsnével kezet fog) Tiszteletem.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Igazán kedves, hogy eljött. (Bemutatja a férfiakat) Pickering ezredes úr...

 

FREDDY

(meghajol) Á, tiszteletem.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(folytatja) Azt hiszem, a fiamat nem ismeri, Higgins professzort...

 

FREDDY

(Higginshez lép) Tiszteletem.

 

HIGGINS

(úgy néz rá, mint valami zsebmetszőre) Esküszöm, hogy láttam már magát valahol... De hol?

 

FREDDY

Nem hinném.

 

HIGGINS

(lemondóan) Mindegy, hol. Üljön le. (Megrázza Freddy kezét, és valósággal odalöki az ottománra, ő maga pedig átkerül a másik oldalra)

 

HIGGINS

Nahát, együtt is volnánk. (Leül az ottománra, Eynsfordné balján) De mi az ördögről beszéljünk, amíg nincs itt Eliza?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Henry fiam, a Királyi Akadémia felolvasó estéinek te vagy a büszkesége, de egyszerűbb alkalmakon meglehetős nehéz próbára teszed embertársaidat.

 

HIGGINS

Igazán? Nagyon sajnálom. (Hirtelen földerül) Különben, magam is azt hiszem! (Hangosan elneveti magát)

 

CLARA

(Higginst házasság szempontjából is számba vehető férfinak ítéli) Nagyon helyes! Nem kenyerem nekem sem a finomkodás. Bárcsak mindenki őszintén kimondaná, amit gondol!

 

HIGGINS

Isten mentsen!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(folytatja lánya eszmefuttatását) De miért?

 

HIGGINS

Már az is elég botrányos, amiről az emberek azt hiszik, hogy gondolniuk illik, hát még amit igazán gondolnak! Összedőlne az egész cirkusz! Csakugyan azt hiszi, hogy olyan kellemes volna, ha én most kirukkolnék azzal, amit magamban gondolok?

 

CLARA

(kedélyesen) Olyan cinikus gondolatai vannak?

 

HIGGINS

Cinikus gondolataim? Ki a fene mondja, hogy cinikusak? Illetlenek - erről van szó.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(komolyan) Ó, én bizonyos vagyok benne, hogy ezt nem gondolja komolyan, tanár úr.

 

HIGGINS

Nézze: többé-kevésbé mindenki vadember. Mi azt hisszük, hogy civilizáltak, kulturáltak vagyunk - hogy értünk az irodalomhoz, a festészethez, tudományokhoz, filozófiához satöbbi. De hány akad közöttünk, akinek valójában csak fogalma is van róla, hogy egyáltalán mit jelentenek ezek a szavak? (Clarához) Mit tud maga az irodalomról? (Eynsfordnéhoz) Mit tud maga a tudományról? (Freddyre mutatva) Mit tud ő a tudományról, művészetről vagy bármiről a világon? S azt hiszik, van nekem csak halvány fogalmam is a filozófiáról?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(szemrehányóan) Vagy a jó modorról!

 

A SZOBALÁNY

(kitárja az ajtót) Doolittle kisasszony. (Eltűnik)

 

HIGGINS

(felugrik és anyjához szalad) Itt van, mama (Lábujjhegyre áll és anyja feje fölött integet Elizának, hogy tudtára adja: melyik a háziasszony)

 

A választékosan öltözött Eliza oly előkelő és szép, hogy amint belép, láttára valamennyien meghökkenten kelnek fel. Eliza, Higgins integetéssel adott utasításait követve, hibátlan kecsességgel és eleganciával Higginsnéhez lép.

 

LIZA

(választékosan pedáns kiejtéssel és feltűnően szép hangon szólal meg) Jó napot kívánok, asszonyom. Higgins professzor bátorított fel, hogy eljöjjek. (Alig észrevehetően küzd magával, nehogy a "Higgins" nevet "Iggins"-nek ejtse; s vállalkozása teljes sikerrel jár)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(szívélyesen) Jól tette. Nagyon örülök, hogy megismerhetem, kedvesem.

 

PICKERING

Jó napot kívánok, Doolittle kisasszony.

 

LIZA

(kezet fog vele) Pickering ezredes úr, ha nem tévedek!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Úgy rémlik, találkoztunk már valahol, Doolittle kisasszony, emlékszem a szemére.

 

LIZA

Jó estét kívánok, asszonyom. (Kecsesen leül az ottománra, Higgins üresen maradt helyére.)

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(bemutatja a lányát) Leányom, Clara.

 

LIZA

Ó, nagyon örvendek!

 

CLARA

(hevesen) Én is végtelenül. (Leül az ottománra, Eliza mellé, és tekintetével majd felfalja)

 

FREDDY

(átkerül az ő oldalukra) Egész bizonyos, hogy már volt szerencsénk.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(folytatja a bemutatást) Fiam, Freddy.

 

LIZA

Nagyon örvendek. (Freddy meghajlik, és elbűvölten ül le az Erzsébet-kori székbe)

 

HIGGINS

(hirtelen) A szakramentumát! Rémlik már!... (Mindenki meredten néz rá) A Szent Pál kapujában, az esőben... (Elkeseredve) A fene egye meg!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Henry, nagyon kérlek! (Higgins épp az asztal sarkára akar ülni) Ne ülj az íróasztalomra, összetöröd!

 

HIGGINS

(duzzogva) Bocsánat!

 

A díványhoz megy; útközben megbotlik a kályhaellenzőben és a piszkavasban, néhány káromkodást mormolva túljut az akadályokon, s befejezve ezt a szerencsétlen utat, olyan türelmetlenül zökken le a díványra, hogy az majdnem összeroppan. Higginsné ránéz, de erőt vesz magán, és egy szót se szól. Hosszú, kínos szünet.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(végül is könnyedén szólal meg) Mit gondolnak, fog esni?

 

LIZA

Úgy tetszik, az enyhe nyugati depresszió keleti irányba elhúzódik szigetünkről. De a barométer állása szerint aligha várható jelentősebb változás.

 

FREDDY

Haha, hát ez csudajó!

 

LIZA

Mi lelte, fiatalember? Fogadni mernék, hogy hibátlanul mondtam.

 

FREDDY

Meg kell veszni!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Szeretném hinni, hogy az idő nem fordul hűvösebbre. Az influenza olyan rohamosan terjed. Tavaszonként egész családunkban megteszi szokásos körútját.

 

LIZA

(sötéten) Nagynéném is influenzában halt meg - legalábbis azt mondták...

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Ó?!

 

LIZA

(az előbbi tragikus hangon) De én fejemet teszem rá, hogy megnyuvasztották.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(meghökkenve) Megnyuvasztották?

 

LIZA

Meg hát! Talán nem hiszi? Már mért halt volna meg influenzában? Tavaly torokgyíkja volt, mégis talpra állt. Pedig már egész belekékült - bizonyisten, ezzel a két szememmel láttam! Már mindenki azt hitte, hogy kampec; de akkor az apám egy nagy kanál pálinkát csurgatott le a torkán, s attól úgy magához tért, hogy majd a kanalat is lenyelte.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(megdöbbenve) Jóságos isten!

 

LIZA

(folytatja a vádakat) Már hogy is patkolt volna el influenzában egy olyan hatlóerős asszony! És hova lett az új szalmakalapja, amit nekem kellett volna örökölni? Megfújták! Hát én azt mondom, aki a kalapot megfújta, az nyuvasztotta meg az öregasszonyt!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Mit jelent az, hogy "megnyuvasztotta"?

 

HIGGINS

(gyorsan) Ó, ez eufémizmus, az új társalgási tónus... megnyuvasztani annyi mint: meggyilkolni.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(rémülten Elizához) Csak nem hiszi komolyan, hogy a nagynénjét meggyilkolták?!

 

LIZA

Miért ne hinném? Akikkel együtt lakott, egy kalaptűért is eltették volna láb alól, nemhogy egy kalapért!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

De az édesapjától sem volt helyes, hogy szeszes italt töltött a torkába, ezzel meg is ölhette volna!

 

LIZA

A nagynénémet? Úgy szopta az a kisüstit, mint az anyatejet! De meg az apám olyan nagy piás volt maga is, hogy igazán tudhatta, mire jó a pálinka!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Úgy érti, hogy ivott az édesapja?

 

LIZA

Hogy ivott-e?! Mint a kefekötő.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Milyen szörnyű kereszt lehetett ez magán!

 

LIZA

Frászt! Nem ártott az annak egy fikarcnyit sem! Meg azután nem is állandóan ivott. Csak úgy - mondjuk -, mikor kedve szottyant. És mindig sokkal kezesebb volt, ha már egy-két decit leöntött. Mikor nem keresett, az anyám adott neki néhány pennyt, azzal küldte el: "De aztán jókedvűen gyere nekem haza!" Sok asszony van ám, aki itatja az urát, hogy ki tudja vele bírni. (Egyre fesztelenebbül) Mert higgyék el: ha egy emberben lelkiismeret van, amíg józan, nem hagyja nyugodni, attól aztán kiállhatatlan lesz. De egy-két kupica csodát tesz. (Freddyhez, aki visszafojtott nevetéssel küszködik) Maga min röhög?

 

FREDDY

Az új társalgási tónuson. Remekül csinálja.

 

LIZA

Ha remekül csinálom, mit röhög? (Higginshez) Csináltam hibát?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(közbevág) Szó sincs róla, Doolittle kisasszony.

 

LIZA

Na, hála istennek! (Nekihevülve) Én mindig is azt mondtam...

 

HIGGINS

(feláll és az órájára néz) Ehem!...

 

LIZA

(ránéz, megérti a jelzést és felkel) Sajnos, mennem kell. (Mindnyájan felkelnek, Freddy az ajtóhoz lép) Nagyon örvendek, hogy itt lehettem, a viszontlátásra. (Vigyáz, hogy ne mondja azt: "viszon'látásra", "t" nélkül. Kezet fog Higginsnével)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Viszontlátásra.

 

LIZA

Viszontlátásra, ezredes úr.

 

PICKERING

Viszontlátásra, Doolittle kisasszony. (Kezet fog)

 

LIZA

(a többiek felé köszönve) Jó estét kívánok mindnyájuknak.

 

FREDDY

(kitárja előtte az ajtót) Ha volna kedve a parkon át sétálni, én nagyon szívesen...

 

LIZA

(előkelően) Sétálni? Franc nyavalyát! (Általános megdöbbenés) Taxin megyek! (Elvonul)

 

Pickering dermedten ül le, Freddy kilép a balkonra, hogy még egy tekintetet vessen Eliza után.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(a megrázkódtatástól alig jut szóhoz) Hát én bizony nehezen tudom megszokni az új tónust.

 

CLARA

(bosszankodva zökken az Erzsébet-kori székbe) Jaj, mama, pedig igazán olyan eredeti! Az emberek azt fogják hinni, hogy kikoptunk a társaságból, ha te ilyen vaskalapos maradsz.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Hát én bizony megvallom, vaskalapos vagyok, és remélem, Clara, te tartózkodni fogsz attól a kifejezéstől. Ahhoz már hozzászoktam, hogy a fiatalembereket pasasoknak hívod, hogy neked minden marha jó vagy marha rossz; pedig - mondhatom - úrilány nem vesz a szájára ilyen kifejezéseket! De amit ez a lány mondott, az mégis több a soknál! Mit szól ehhez, ezredes úr?

 

PICKERING

Engem ne tessék kérdezni. Én évekig Indiában éltem, és azalatt úgy megváltozott a társalgási tónus, hogy néha azt sem tudom, a fehér asztalnál ülök-e, vagy matrózkocsmában?

 

CLARA

Megszokás dolga az egész! Se jó, se rossz! Senki se gondol semmire, mikor azt mondja. De olyan zamata van, olyan viccesen lehet ropogtatni. Szerintem elragadó az új tónus, és teljesen ártalmatlan.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(feláll) Nos akkor, azt hiszem, ideje mennünk.

 

Pickering és Higgins felkel.

 

CLARA

(szintén felkel) Ó, igen, még három háznál is várnak ma este. Viszontlátásra, asszonyom. Viszontlátásra, ezredes úr! Viszontlátásra, professzor úr.

 

HIGGINS

(felkel a díványról, és az ajtóhoz kíséri) Viszontlátásra. Okvetlenül próbálja ki az új tónust mind a három háznál. Csak semmi gátlás! Bátran - bele!

 

CLARA

(széles mosollyal) Bízza rám! Viszontlátásra. Micsoda buta nyavalya ez az egész viktoriánus álszemérem!

 

HIGGINS

(vadítva Clarát) Fene buta nyavalya!

 

CLARA

Franc nyavalya!

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(megvonaglik) Clara!

 

CLARA

Haha. (Ragyogó arccal távozik, abban a boldog hiszemben, hogy vérbeli modern nő, s még a lépcsőházban is hangzik csengő nevetése)

 

FREDDY

No de hát ez!... (Letesz arról, hogy befejezze a mondatot, és Higginsnéhez lép) A viszontlátásra.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(kezét nyújtja) Viszontlátásra. Szeretne ismét találkozni Doolittle kisasszonnyal?

 

FREDDY

De mennyire! De mennyire!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nos, tudja a fogadónapjaimat.

 

FREDDY

Ó, hogyne, végtelen hálás vagyok. A viszontlátásra. (Távozik)

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Viszontlátásra, professzor úr.

 

HIGGINS

Viszontlátásra.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(Pickeringhez) Hát, hiába: sosem leszek képes kiejteni a számon azt a szót!

 

PICKERING

Ne is tessék! Nem okvetlenül szükséges. Egész jól meglesz anélkül is.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Csak ez a Clara ne gyötörne úgy, hogy nem tudom megszokni a modern stílust. Viszontlátásra.

 

PICKERING

Viszontlátásra, asszonyom. (Kezet fognak)

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

(Higginsnéhez) Ne vegye rossz néven a lányomtól.

 

Pickering, észrevéve Eynsfordné tompított hangjából, hogy ezt neki nem kell hallania, diszkréten az ablakhoz lép, Higgins mellé.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Olyan szegények vagyunk, olyan ritkán vihetem valahová szegénykét! Azt hiszi, hogy ez a divat. (Higginsné látva, hogy szeme könnyes, barátságosan megszorítja kezét, és az ajtóhoz kíséri) De a fiam helyes, ugye?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ó, nagyon! Mindig örömmel fogom látni.

 

EYNSFORDNÉ

Köszönöm, drágám, viszontlátásra. (Távozik)

 

HIGGINS

(izgatottan) Nos? Szalonképes a lány? (Lecsap anyjára ezekkel a szavakkal, s az ottománra nyomja őt Eliza helyére. Pickering visszaül székébe)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ostoba kölyök! Hogy volna szalonképes? Lehet a fonetika és a szabásművészet büszkesége, de ha csak egy percig is azt hiszed, hogy nem árulja el magát minden kiejtett szavában, akkor azt kell mondanom, fiam, hogy elvesztetted a fejedet.

 

PICKERING

De nem gondolja, asszonyom, hogy némileg mégis lehetne segíteni? Úgy értem, hogy kiküszöbölnénk a leány szótárából a - vérmesebb kifejezéseket.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Amíg Henry kezében van, reménytelen az eset.

 

HIGGINS

(bosszús) Azt akarod mondani, hogy rossz a stílusom?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nem, édes fiam, tökéletes volna egy matrózkocsmában. De kétségbeejtő a lány szájából egy garden partyn.

 

HIGGINS

(mélyen megsértve) Ki kell jelentenem, hogy...

 

PICKERING

(félbeszakítva barátját) Henry! Ismerd el, ami igaz! Mi tagadás, utoljára húsz évvel ezelőtt a kaszárnyában hallottam olyan szaftos stílust, mint a tied.

 

HIGGINS

(durcásan) Jó, hát ha te mondod, elhiszem: nem mindig beszélek úgy, mint egy püspök.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(egy mozdulattal lecsitítva Henryt) Ezredes úr, nem mondaná meg nekem világosan, mi a helyzet otthon a fiamnál?

 

PICKERING

(nagyon vidám lesz, mert azt hiszi, végre más témáról beszélnek) Hát azt tudja, hogy én is odaköltöztem. Együtt dolgozunk Henryvel az én indiai tájszótáramon. Mindkettőnknek sokkal kényelmesebb így, mintha...

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Rendben van, ezt mind tudom. Remek megoldás. De hol lakik a lány?

 

HIGGINS

Hát velünk. Hol másutt lakna?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

De milyen minőségben? Háztartási alkalmazott? Vagy ha nem, akkor mi?

 

PICKERING

(lassan) Azt hiszem, kezdem érteni, mire céloz, asszonyom.

 

HIGGINS

Vesszek meg, ha értem. Hónapokon keresztül mindennap vesződtem a lánnyal, míg elértük a mai színvonalat. Különben nagyon sok hasznát vesszük. Tudja, hogy hol vannak a holmijaim, és számon tartja, hogy kivel mikor van találkozóm.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Hogy fér meg vele a házvezetőnőd?

 

HIGGINS

Pearce-né? Nagyon örül, hogy Eliza annyi terhet levett a válláról. Míg a lány oda nem jött, neki kellett mindent rendben tartania és mindent eszembe juttatnia. Csak egy buta bogara van. Ha Eliza szóba jön, folyton azt hajtogatja: "Csak nem gondolja komolyan, tanár úr?" Igaz-e, Pick?

 

PICKERING

Úgy van. Ez a refrén: "Csak nem gondolja komolyan, tanár úr?" Mindig ez a vége, ha Elizáról van szó.

 

HIGGINS

Mintha én nem foglalkoznám elég komolyan Elizával! A hajmeresztő magánhangzóival és mássalhangzóival! Hisz már valósággal kifacsart citrom vagyok, olyan komolyan veszem: végkimerülésig figyelem az ajkait, a fogait, a nyelvét - sőt még a lelkét is, mert az a legfurább az egész históriában.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Két óriási bébi játszik egy élő babával.

 

HIGGINS

Játszunk? Soha keményebb munkám nem volt! Értsd ezt meg, mama! El sem tudod képzelni, milyen veszettül izgató kézbe venni egy emberi lényt, és gyúrni belőle egy másikat, egy egész másikat - pusztán azzal, hogy újra tanítjuk beszélni! Ez azt jelenti, hogy áthidaljuk a legtátongóbb űrt, ami elválasztja egymástól a társadalmi osztályokat és a lelkeket!

 

PICKERING

(közelebb rukkol székével) Hallatlanul érdekes! Higgye el, asszonyom, roppant komolyan foglalkozunk Elizával. És minden héten - mindennap - új meg új csodákkal lep meg bennünket. (Még közelebb rukkol) Minden stádiumát megörökítjük: egy csomó hanglemez, egy csomó fénykép...

 

HIGGINS

(a másik oldalról támad) Becsületszavamra, a legizgalmasabb kísérlet, amit valaha is végeztem. Eliza egész életünket kitölti - nem igaz, Pick?

 

PICKERING

Folyton Elizát emlegetjük...

 

HIGGINS

Elizát tanítgatjuk...

 

PICKERING

Elizát öltöztetjük...

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Tessék?

 

HIGGINS

Új meg új Elizát tervezünk!

 

A következőket a szereplők egyszerre mondják

 

HIGGINS

Nem is hiszed, milyen rendkívül finom a hallása...

 

PICKERING

Higgye el, asszonyom, az a valóságos...

 

HIGGINS

Olyan tanulékony, mint a papagáj. Kipróbáltam vele...

 

PICKERING

...valóságos zseni! Gyönyörűen zongorázik...

 

HIGGINS

...minden hangot, amit emberi lény egyáltalán ki tud adni...

 

PICKERING

Elvittük klasszikus hangversenyekre, elvittük...

 

HIGGINS

...európai nyelvjárásokat, afrikai nyelvjárásokat, hottentotta...

 

PICKERING

...orfeumokba: teljesen mindegy neki! Mindent egyformán lejátszik...

 

HIGGINS

...csettegető hangokat; olyan dolgokat, amikkel én évekig vesződtem...

 

PICKERING

...odahaza egyszeri hallás után Beethovent és...

 

HIGGINS

...ő képes egycsapásra megtanulni. Mintha egész életében ...

 

PICKERING

...Brahmsot, éppúgy, mint Lehárt, Lionel Monctont!

 

HIGGINS

...egyebet sem csinált volna!

 

PICKERING

Pedig hat hónappal ezelőtt még egy billentyűt sem tudott leütni!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(befogja a fülét, mert a két férfi úgy túl akarja egymást kiabálni, hogy az már elviselhetetlen) Pszt! Pszt! Pszt!

 

Mindketten elhallgatnak.

 

PICKERING

Bocsánatot kérek. (Visszavonul székével eredeti helyére)

 

HIGGINS

Bocsánat, de ha Pickering kiereszti a hangját, akkor ott halandó ember többet szóhoz nem jut.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Csitulj már, Henry. Nem gondolja, ezredes úr, hogy amikor Eliza átlépte a Wimpole utcai lakás küszöbét, vele együtt más is megjelent...

 

PICKERING

Az apja. De Henry egykettőre lerázta a nyakáról.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Sokkal helyesebb lett volna, ha az anyja jelentkezik. De mert ő nem jelentkezett, jelentkezik másvalami.

 

PICKERING

Micsoda?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(akaratlanul elárulva, hogy melyik generációhoz tartozik) Egy probléma.

 

PICKERING

Értem. Hogy hogyan adjuk majd ki úrinőnek...

 

HIGGINS

Ezt én megmondom. Félig már meg is oldottam.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nem! Jaj, micsoda két tyúkeszű férfi! Az a probléma, hogy mi lesz a lánnyal azután!

 

HIGGINS

Mi itt a probléma? A lány mehet tovább a maga útján, mindazokkal az előnyökkel, amiket nekem köszönhet.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Olyan előnyökkel, mint az a szerencsétlen asszony, aki az előbb volt itt. Olyan szokásokkal, amik lehetetlenné teszik, hogy egy nő maga keresse meg a kenyerét - csak éppen egy úrinő jövedelmét nem biztosítják neki. Erre gondolsz?

 

PICKERING

(zavartan) Ó, asszonyom, ez a dolog rendben lesz. (Felkel, hogy induljon)

 

HIGGINS

(szintén felkel) Majd keresünk neki valami könnyű munkát.

 

PICKERING

Az a lány nagyon boldog. Ne tessék aggódni miatta. Viszontlátásra, asszonyom. (Úgy rázza meg Higginsné kezét, mintha egy megriadt gyermeket vigasztalna, majd a kijárat felé indul)

 

HIGGINS

Akárhogy is: kár ezen törni a fejünket. Most már benne vagyunk. Isten veled, mama. (Megcsókolja anyját, és Pickering után megy)

 

PICKERING

(megfordul, hogy még egy utolsó megnyugtatással szolgáljon) Annyi út nyílik meg előtte. Majd a legjobbat választjuk. Viszontlátásra, asszonyom.

 

HIGGINS

(Pickeringhez, távozóban) Elvisszük a Shakespeare-kiállításra is Earlscourtba!

 

PICKERING

Okvetlenül! Elragadó megjegyzései lesznek!

 

HIGGINS

És otthon végig fog utánozni mindenkit!

 

PICKERING

Pompás!

 

Még kintről is hallatszik harsogó nevetésük.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(türelmetlenül fölkel és átül íróasztalához. Félreseper kezével egy csomó papirost. Elővesz a fiókból egy tiszta ívet, és elszántan írni kezd. Háromszor is abbahagyja. Végül lecsapja a tollat, dühösen megragadja az asztalt, és kitör) Férfiak! Férfiak! Férfiak!!!

 

 

Nyilvánvaló, hogy Eliza még nem hercegnő, Higgins még nem nyerte meg a fogadást. De a hat hónap még nem is telt el; annak idején majd Eliza valóban kész hercegnőként lép a világ elé. Hogy s mint történik ez? Képzeljünk el egy követségi palotát Londonban, valamelyik nyári este, sötétedés után. A csarnokajtó előtt kifeszített ernyős mennyezet és az oldalkijárat kárpitjai jelzik, hogy nagy fogadásra készülődnek. Odakint a bejárat körül összeverődött járókelők lesik a vendégek érkezését.

 

Egy Rolls-Royce kocsi érkezik. Először Pickering száll ki estélyi öltözékben, kitüntetésekkel és érdemrendekkel díszítve. Kezét nyújtja Elizának. A lány operai belépőben, estélyi ruhában, legyezővel, gyémántokkal, virágokkal s egyebekkel ékesen lép ki a kocsiból. Végül száll ki Higgins. A kocsi elhajt, ők hárman pedig felmennek a lépcsőn, be a palotába, melynek ajtaja közeledtükre kitárul.

 

Odabent egy tágas előcsarnok várja őket, melyből széles lépcső vezet föl. Baloldalt van a férfiruhatár. Az urak itt rakják le kalapjukat és köpenyüket.

 

Jobbra ajtó nyílik a női ruhatárba. A hölgyek köpenybe burkolva lépnek be, és káprázatosan ragyogva lépnek elő. Pickering Eliza fülébe súg, a női öltözőszoba felé mutatva. A lány eltűnik a jelzett irányban. Higgins és Pickering leveti köpenyét, s átveszi a jegyet a ruhatárostól. Egy vendég, aki ugyanezzel bajlódik, háttal áll nekik. Miután megkapja jegyét, megfordul; most látjuk csak, milyen komoly képű s irgalmatlanul szőrös ábrázatú ifjú. Hatalmas bajusza buján tenyésző pofaszakállba olvad át. Szeme fölött bozontos szőrpamacs. Haja hátul erősen fel van nyírva és ragyog az olajtól. Egyébként nagyon elegáns. Több értéktelen kitüntetést visel. Nyilvánvaló, hogy külföldi, sejthetőleg valami szőrös képű magyar martalóc. De rettenetes bajuszát leszámítva, igen barátságos, kedélyes és bőbeszédű.

 

Megpillantva Higgins professzort, két karját szélesen kitárja, s lelkesen lép hozzá.

 

A TORZONBORZ

Maestro! Maestro! (Megöleli Higginst, s mindkét felől megcsókolja) Meg sem ismer?

 

HIGGINS

Nem én! Ki az ördög maga?

 

A TORZONBORZ

A tanítványa! Az első tanítványa. A tanár úr legjobb, leghíresebb tanítványa. Én vagyok a kis Nepomuk, a csodagyerek! Egész Európában híressé tettem a Higgins nevet. A professzor úr tanított fonetikára. Engem csak nem felejtett el?!

 

HIGGINS

De mért nem borotválkozik?

 

NEPOMUK

Nekem nincs olyan tekintélyes képem, mint a tanár úrnak, olyan állam, olyan homlokom. Ha megborotválkozom - észre sem vesznek. Így pedig híres lettem: mindenki úgy hív, a torzonborz Nepomuk.

 

HIGGINS

De mit keres itt, ebben a cifra társaságban?

 

NEPOMUK

Tolmács vagyok. Harminckét nyelven beszélek. Nélkülözhetetlen lettem az ilyen nemzetközi fogadásokon. Ön a nagy zsargonszakértő: bárkiről megmondja egész Londonban, hol lakik, mihelyt a páciens kinyitja a száját. Én bárkiről megmondom egész Európában.

 

Egy lakáj fut le a főlépcsőn, és Nepomukhoz siet.

 

A LAKÁJ

Kéretik önt odafent. Őexcellenciája nem érti, mit mond a görög úr.

 

NEPOMUK

Kérem, hogyne, azonnal.

 

A lakáj sarkon fordul és eltűnik a tömegben.

 

NEPOMUK

(Higginshez) Ez a görög diplomata úgy tesz, mintha nem tudna angolul. De engem nem téveszt meg! Egy clerkenvelli órás fia! Olyan förtelmesen beszél angolul, hogy ha csak egyet mukkan, már elárulta a származását. Én segítek neki a kegyes csalásban; de fizet is, mint a köles. Mind fizet az ilyen, csak a markom kell tartani. Hahaha! (Felsiet a lépcsőn)

 

PICKERING

Csakugyan szakember ez a fickó? Leleplezheti, megzsarolhatja Elizát?

 

HIGGINS

Majd meglátjuk. Ha leleplezi, elvesztettem a fogadást.

 

Eliza előjön az öltözőszobából és a férfiakhoz lép.

 

PICKERING

Csak bátran, leányom! Nem fél?

 

LIZA

Ezredes úr ideges?

 

PICKERING

Irgalmatlanul. Szakasztott úgy érzem magam, mint az első ütközetem előtt. Mindig az első a legnehezebb.

 

LIZA

Nekem ez nem az első, ezredes úr. Százszor végigéltem már ezt, otthon, a Külső Drury úton, a vackomon álmodozva. Most is álmodom. Könyörgök, vigyázzon, hogy Higgins tanár úr fel ne ébresszen! Ha rám kiáltana, egyszeriben vége lenne mindennek, s megint úgy beszélnék, mint kinn, a prolinegyedben.

 

PICKERING

Egy szót se, Higgins! (Elizához) Nos, kész van?

 

LIZA

Kész.

 

PICKERING

Gyerünk!

 

Felmennek a lépcsőn, leghátul Higgins. Pickering suttogva mond valamit az első fordulóban álló lakájnak.

 

A LAKÁJ

(az első fordulóban) Doolittle kisasszony, Pickering ezredes úr, Higgins tanár úr!

 

A LAKÁJ

(a második fordulóban) Doolittle kisasszony, Pickering ezredes úr, Higgins tanár úr!

 

A lépcsősor tetején a követ és felesége, oldalukon Nepomukkal, fogadják a vendégeket.

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

(kezet fog Elizával) Na'on örvendek!

 

A HÁZIGAZDA

(hasonlóképpen) Na'on örvendek! - Na'on örvendek, ezredes 'ram.

 

LIZA

(oly kristálytiszta és ünnepélyes kiejtéssel, hogy megrémíti a háziasszonyt) Nagyon örvendek. (Továbbsétál a szalonba)

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

A fogadott lánya, ezredes úr? Nagy sikert jósolok.

 

PICKERING

Nagyon köszönöm, hogy a kedvemért őt is meghívta. (Továbbmegy)

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

(Nepomukhoz) Mindent tudjon meg erről a lányról!

 

NEPOMUK

(meghajlik) Kegyelmes asszonyom... (Eltűnik a tömegben)

 

A HÁZIGAZDA

Na'on örvendek, tanár úr. Ma estére vetélytársa akadt. Úgy mutatkozott be mint az ön tanítványa. Mi a véleménye róla?

 

HIGGINS

Két nap alatt megtanul bármilyen nyelvet. Tud már vagy három tucatot: a butaság biztos jele. Fonetikáról fogalma sincs!

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Na'on örvendek, tanár úr.

 

HIGGINS

Nagyon örvendek. Halálosan unalmas lehet ez a cécó. Bocsásson meg, hogy én is itt vagyok. (Továbbsétál)

 

A szalonban és a belső termekben javában zajlik az élet. Eliza teremről teremre halad. Egész lénye úgy átszellemül a nagy próbától, hogy inkább hasonlít valami sivatagban bolyongó alvajáróhoz, mint egy előkelő társaságba csöppent újonchoz. Amerre jár, elakad a beszélgetés, mindenki megcsodálja toalettjét, ékszereit, különös, vonzó lényét. A háttérben több fiatalember székre áll, hogy lássa. A házigazda és felesége befejezve az üdvözléseket, elvegyül a vendégek között. Higgins mogorván, mint aki torkig van az egésszel, odalép a körülöttük összeverődött csoporthoz.

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Á, itt jön Higgins tanár úr: majd ő megmondja... Kérem, tanár úr, mondjon el mindent erről az elragadó teremtésről!

 

HIGGINS

(morózusan) Milyen elragadó teremtésről?

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Ó, hiszen nagyon jól tudja. Azt mondják, a szép Langtry asszony óta senkit nem csodáltak meg így, székre állva, Londonban.

 

Nepomuk új hírektől izgatottan érkezik.

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

No, csakhogy itt van, Nepomuk! Kinyomozta már, ki ez a lány, ez a Doolittle kisasszony?

 

NEPOMUK

Mindent kinyomoztam: csaló.

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Csaló! Csak nem?

 

NEPOMUK

Igenis, az. Engem nem szed rá. Kizárt dolog, hogy Doolittle-nek hívják!

 

HIGGINS

Miért?

 

NEPOMUK

Mert Doolittle angol név. Ez a lány pedig nem angol.

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Az lehetetlen! Tökéletes az angol kiejtése.

 

NEPOMUK

Túlságosan is tökéletes. Tud mutatni, asszonyom, egyetlen született angolt, aki tökéletesen beszél angolul?! Csak külföldiek beszélnek hibátlanul, akiket megtanítottak rá.

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Igen, valósággal megrémített, ahogy azt mondta: nagyon örvendek. Volt valamikor egy tanárnőm, az beszélt így - halálosan féltem tőle. De hát ha nem angol, akkor miféle?

 

NEPOMUK

Magyar.

 

MIND

Magyar!

 

NEPOMUK

Magyar! Királyi vér. Én is magyar vagyok. Szintén királyi vérből.

 

HIGGINS

Megszólította magyarul?

 

NEPOMUK

Meg. De nagyon okosan viselkedett. Azt felelte: "Kérem, beszéljen angolul; franciául nem tudok." Franciául! El akarja velem hitetni, hogy nem tudja megkülönböztetni a magyart a franciától! Szemfényvesztés! Nagyon jól érti mind a kettőt.

 

HIGGINS

És hogy királyi vér? Hogy jött erre rá?

 

NEPOMUK

Az ösztön, maestro, az ösztön! Egyedül a szkíta fajok sajátja ez az isteni méltóság, ez a fennkölt tekintet. Valódi hercegnő!

 

A HÁZIGAZDA

Mit szól ehhez, professzor úr?

 

HIGGINS

Azt, hogy közönséges prolilány, akit a londoni alvilágból kapart ki valami jó szimatú nyelvtanár. Szerintem a Külső Drury út tájáról való.

 

NEPOMUK

Hahaha! Jaj, maestro, maestro, ön valóságos megszállottja a zsargonkutatásnak. Az ön számára a londoni alvilágon túl - vége a világnak.

 

HIGGINS

(a háziasszonyhoz) S mit gondol a kegyelmes asszony?

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Természetesen Nepomuk úrral tartok. Ez a lány legalábbis hercegnő.

 

A HÁZIGAZDA

Persze lehet, hogy nem törvény szerinti... talán morganatikus házasságból... de kétségtelenül királyi vér.

 

HIGGINS

Fenntartom véleményemet.

 

A HÁZIASSZONY

Jaj, maga javíthatatlan.

 

A csoport feloszlik. Higgins magára marad. Pickering lép hozzá.

 

PICKERING

Hol van? Szemmel kell tartanunk.

 

Eliza érkezik.

 

LIZA

Nem bírom tovább. Mindenki úgy néz. Az elébb egy öreg hölgy azt mondta, hogy szakasztott úgy beszélek, mint Victoria királynő. Bocsásson meg, ha elvesztem a fogadást... a maga fogadását... Én mindent megtettem, de képtelen vagyok olyanná válni, mint ezek.

 

PICKERING

Nem vesztette el, kedvesem: megnyerte a fogadást. Tízszeresen megnyerte!

 

HIGGINS

Hagyjuk itt az egészet. Elegem volt ebből a sok hülyeségből.

 

PICKERING

Eliza is elfáradt. Én pedig megéheztem. Tűnjünk el, és vacsorázzunk meg valahol.

 

 

 

NEGYEDIK FELVONÁS

 

 

Higgins Wimpole utcai dolgozószobája. Éjfélre jár. Senki sincs a szobában. A kandallón álló óra tizenkettőt üt. A kandallóban nem ég tűz: nyári éjszaka van.

 

Csakhamar Higgins és az ezredes hangja hallatszik a lépcsőházban.

 

HIGGINS

(leszól Pickeringhez) Zárd be a kaput, Pick: ma már nem megyek el többet.

 

PICKERING

Helyes. Pearce-né is lefekhet, ugye? Ma már, azt hiszem nem akarunk semmit.

 

Eliza kinyitja az ajtót. A megvilágított ajtónyílásban feltűnik finom alakja. Henry Higgins ennek a finom hölgynek köszönheti, hogy az imént lezajlott estélyen megnyerte a fogadást. Eliza a kandallóhoz lép, és meggyújtja a rajta álló lámpát. Nagyon fáradt: sápadtsága élesen elválik fekete hajától és szemétől. Arca szinte tragikus. Leveti belépőjét; legyezőjét és kesztyűjét a zongorára teszi, s leül a zongora mellé. Némán mered maga elé. Belép Higgins is, frakkban, felöltőben, kalapban. Kezében egy házikabát, melyet még odalent akasztott le. Leveti a felöltőt és a kalapot, s hanyagul az újságtartóra dobja. Hasonlóképpen cselekszik a frakkjával is, majd magára veszi a házikabátot, és fáradtan veti magát a kandalló melletti karosszékbe. Jön Pickering is, kimerülten. Ő is leveti felöltőjét, kalapját, s éppen oda akarja dobni Higginsnek, mikor észbe kap.

 

PICKERING

Hallod-e, Pearce-né majd megmossa a fejünket, ha szanaszét hagyjuk a holminkat a szobában.

 

HIGGINS

Dobj le mindent a korláton át a hallba. Majd reggel megtalálja és összeszedi. Azt fogja hinni, hogy részegek voltunk.

 

PICKERING

Egy kicsit azok is vagyunk. Jött valami posta?

 

HIGGINS

Nem néztem. (Pickering fogja a felöltőket és a kalapokat, s visz le mindent a hallba. Higgins félig dúdol, félig ásít egy áriát a "Nyugat leányá"-ból, majd hirtelen abbahagyja és felkiált) Hol a nyavalyába lehet a papucsom?

 

Eliza sötét pillantást vet rá, majd hirtelen felkel és kimegy. Higgins ismét ásít és dúdol. Pickering megjelenik, kezében a napi postával.

 

PICKERING

Csak nyomtatványok. Neked meg egy illatos levélke, nemesi koronával. (A nyomtatványokat a kandallóba dobja, és leül a szőnyegre, háttal a rostélynak)

 

HIGGINS

(egy pillantást vet a levélbe) Pénzt kínál egy uzsorás. (Ezt is a kandallóba hajítja)

 

Eliza újra megjelenik egy pár nagy, kitaposott papuccsal. Leteszi Higgins elé, majd visszaül előbbi helyére, egy árva szó nélkül.

 

HIGGINS

(újra ásít) Jaj, istenem! Micsoda este volt ez! Ennyi tökkelütött hülyét egy rakáson!... (Le akarja vetni a cipőjét, de amint lábát emelné, tekintete hirtelen a két papucsra esik. Abbahagyja cipője kifűzését, s úgy néz a pár papucsra, mintha magától került volna oda) Ni, ez meg itt van.

 

PICKERING

(nyújtózkodva) No, jól elfáradtam. Ennyi minden egy nap! Garden party, bankett, estély... Sok volt a jóból. Hanem te megnyerted a fogadást, Henry! Eliza kiállta a próbát! És milyen nagyszerűen!

 

HIGGINS

(érzéssel) Hála istennek, túl vagyunk rajta!

 

Eliza megrázkódik, de a férfiak észre sem veszik, mire újra összeszedi magát, és ül tovább meredten, mint eddig.

 

PICKERING

Izgultál a garden partyn? Én nagyon, Eliza, úgy láttam, egy cseppet sem volt ideges.

 

HIGGINS

Nem hát. De én is tudtam, hogy be fog válni. Nem az izgalom fárasztott ki, hanem ez a hathónapi robot. Eleinte még érdekes volt, mikor a fonetikánál tartottunk; de aztán már torkig voltam az egésszel. Ha a fogadás nem köt, már két hónappal ezelőtt hagytam volna a fenébe. Hülye ötlet volt. Halálunalom...

 

PICKERING

Ugyan már! A garden party veszettül izgalmas volt. Csak úgy kalapált a szívem.

 

HIGGINS

Az első három perc még ért valamit. De mikor már láttam, hogy minden megy, mint a karikacsapás - ennek is vége lett... Úgy éreztem magam, mint egy medve a ketrecben, aki csak jár föl-le, föl-le, mert nem tehet okosabbat. De az ebéd volt a legszörnyűbb! Hogy az ember egy óra hosszat csak üljön, üljön, zabálva, és senki mással ne tudjon beszélni, mint azzal a közveszélyesen buta dámával, akit éppen mellé ültettek! Nekem ebből elég volt, barátom. Több hercegnőt nem állítok elő a laboratóriumban. Ezt a poklot nem járom meg újra.

 

PICKERING

Te sohasem bírtad a társaságot. (Átballag a zongorához) Én néha élvezem. Úgy érzem, megfiatalít. De hallod-e, nagy siker volt ez, óriási siker! Egyszer-kétszer már megrémültem, hogy Eliza túl jó a szerepében. Tudod, egy valódi dáma megközelítőleg sem lehet ilyen tökéletes. A legtöbb buta úrinő azt hiszi, hogy az előkelő ranggal már együtt jár az előkelő stílus is - és ezért sohasem szánja rá magát, hogy megtanulja. Ha valami mesteri, az már gyanús; mérget lehet rá venni, hogy mesterséges.

 

HIGGINS

Ez az! Meg kell veszni, hogy ez az egész üresfejű banda még a saját "mesterségét" sem képes megtanulni. (Fölkel) De az a fő, hogy túl vagyunk rajta. Végre lefekhetem, és nem kell a holnaptól rettegnem.

 

Eliza szépsége már szinte gyilkoló.

 

PICKERING

No, lassan én is lefekszem. De akárhogyan is: nagy dolog volt ez! Büszke lehetsz a diadalodra. Jó éjszakát. (El)

 

HIGGINS

(utánaindul) Jó éjszakát. (Az ajtóból vállán keresztül hátraszól) Oltsa el a villanyt, Eliza; és mondja meg Pearce-nének, hogy reggel nem kell kávé: teát iszom. (El)

 

Eliza próbál magán uralkodni s közönyt színleli, míg a kandallóhoz megy, hogy leoltsa a lámpát. De közben olyan indulatba jön, hogy csaknem elsikoltja magát. Először leül Higgins székébe, és görcsösen markolja a szék karját. Azután nem bírja tovább: földre veti magát, és eszeveszetten tombol.

 

HIGGINS

(elkeseredve kiabál kintről) Hova a fenébe tettem a papucsomat? (Megjelenik az ajtóban)

 

LIZA

(fölkapja a két papucsot, és egyiket a másik után teljes erejéből Higginshez vágja) Itt a papucsa! Tessék! Tessék! Nyelje le, forduljon föl vele!

 

HIGGINS

(döbbenten) Mi az?... (Odamegy hozzá) Mi történt? Keljen fel! (Felrántja a földről) Valami baja van?

 

LIZA

(alig kap levegőt) Semmi bajom magával. Megnyertem magának a fogadást. Ez kellett csak. Én persze nem számítok.

 

HIGGINS

Maga nyerte meg nekem a fogadást! Maga! Pöffeszkedő béka! Én nyertem meg! Mi lelte, hogy fejemhez vágja a papucsomat?

 

LIZA

Össze akartam hasgatni a képit! Önző barom! Meg tudnám fojtani. Mér nem hagyott a sárba, mér nem? Most hálát ad istennek, hogy túl van az egészen és lökhet megin vissza a mocsokba, ugye, ugye?! (Ujjai görcsbe merevednek a dühtől)

 

HIGGINS

(hideg csodálkozással néz rá) Ideges a kis nő.

 

LIZA

(visszafojtott dühe egy sikolyban tör ki, és körmeit Higgins arcába akarja vájni)

 

HIGGINS

(elkapja a csuklóját) Azt nem. Veszett macska! Húzza be a körmét! Hogy mer velem szembeszállni!? Üljön le, és egy mukkanást se halljak! (Belöki a karosszékbe)

 

LIZA

(akit lenyűgöz a fölényes erő és tekintély) Mi lesz velem? Mi lesz velem?

 

HIGGINS

Hogy az ördögbe tudjam, hogy mi lesz magával? Mit számít az, hogy mi lesz magával?

 

LIZA

Magának nem számít, tudom, maga nem törődik velem! Magátul akár meg is halhatok. Magának az a két randa papucs is fontosabb, mint én!

 

HIGGINS

(mennydörögve) Nem randa, hanem ronda!

 

LIZA

(keserű megadással) Ronda. Asziszem, már úgyis mindegy.

 

Szünet. Eliza reménytelen, megtört. Higgins kényelmetlenül érzi magát.

 

HIGGINS

(a legfölényesebb hangon) Mi ütött magába, hogy így viselkedik? Talán bizony valami kifogása van a bánásmód ellen?

 

LIZA

Nem.

 

HIGGINS

Megbántotta valaki? Pickering ezredes? Pearce-né, vagy valamelyik cseléd.

 

LIZA

Nem.

 

HIGGINS

Remélem, nem akarja azt mondani, hogy én bántam rosszul magával?

 

LIZA

Nem.

 

HIGGINS

No, ennek örülök. (Enyhébben) Nyilván kimerítette ez a mai nap. Akar egy pohár pezsgőt? (Az ajtó felé indul)

 

LIZA

Nem. (Eszébe jut a jó modor követelménye) Köszönöm.

 

HIGGINS

(ismét jókedvűen) Napok óta gyűlt ez fel magában. Érthető, hogy nagy idegfeszültségben volt a garden party előtt. De túl vagyunk rajta. (Kedvesen megveregeti a vállát. Eliza összerezzen) Nincs miért fájjon a feje.

 

LIZA

Nincs. Magának nincs miért fájjon a feje. (Hirtelen fölkel, a zongorához megy, és ott leül, arcát kezébe temetve) Úristen! Bárcsak meghalhatnék.

 

HIGGINS

(őszinte meglepetéssel) Miért? Az isten szerelmére, miért? (Nyugodtan folytatja, hozzálépve) Hallgasson rám, Eliza. Ez az egész kétségbeesés tisztára szubjektív.

 

LIZA

Ezt én nem értem, ehhez buta vagyok.

 

HIGGINS

Úgy értem, hogy képzelődés. Rossz hangulat, semmi más. Senki sem bántotta magát. Nincs semmi baj. Le fog feküdni, mint jó kislányhoz illik, és alszik egyet rá. Sírjon egy kicsit, imádkozzon egy kicsit - és minden rendben lesz.

 

LIZA

A maga imádságát már hallottam: "Hála istennek, túl vagyunk rajta!"

 

HIGGINS

(türelmetlenül) Maga talán nem boldog, hogy túl vagyunk rajta? Végre szabad, és azt teheti, amit akar.

 

LIZA

(kétségbeesve összeszedi magát) Mit? Mire vagyok én jó most? Mire nevelt engem? Hova mehetek? Mihez foghatok? Mi lesz énbelőlem?

 

HIGGINS

(kezdi érteni, de nem veszi komolyan) Ó, hát ez a baja? (Két kezét zsebre dugja, és szokott módján sétálni kezd, zsebeinek tartalmát csörgetve. Úgy beszél, mintha merő jóságból bocsátkoznék egy jelentéktelen kérdés megtárgyalásába) Én nem sokat törném a fejem a maga helyébe. Azt hiszem, minden nehézség nélkül el tudna helyezkedni itt vagy ott, ámbár én nem is gondoltam rá, hogy el kellene mennie. (Eliza hirtelen rápillant, de Higgins nem néz rá, hanem a zongorán levő csemegék közt válogat szemével, s végül egy alma mellett dönt) Férjhez is mehetne. (Nagyot harap az almából, és harsogva rágja) Tudja, Eliza, nem minden férfi olyan megátalkodott agglegény, mint én meg az ezredes. A legtöbb olyan házasodós. Szegény ördögök! És maga igazán nem csúnya; néha egész jólesik magára nézni - persze nem most, mikor bőg, és olyan ádáz képet vág, mint egy boszorkány. De mikor nincs semmi baja, akkor azt lehet mondani, vonzó. Már tudniillik a házasodósok szemében. Most feküdjön le és aludja jól ki magát; aztán keljen fel, nézzen a tükörbe, és mindjárt megjön az önbizalma.

 

Eliza ismét ránéz szótlanul és mozdulatlanul, tekintete azonban kárba vész. Higgins mennyei gyönyörűséggel eszi az almát.

 

HIGGINS

(mint akinek zseniális ötlete támadt) Azt hiszem, az anyám találna is az aranyifjak közt alkalmas jelöltet.

 

LIZA

Mi a körút sarkán már túl voltunk ezen.

 

HIGGINS

(mint aki most ébred fel) Mit mond?

 

LIZA

Virágot árultam, de magamat nem. Most, hogy úrinőt faragott belőlem, nincs egyéb mondanivalóm. Inkább hagyott volna ott, ahol voltam!

 

HIGGINS

(az almacsutkát határozott mozdulattal a kandallóba dobja) Bolond beszéd! Ne sértse meg az emberi kapcsolatokat azzal, hogy mindjárt adásvételről beszél. Ha nem tetszik az a fiatalember, ne menjen hozzá.

 

LIZA

Mi mást tehetnék?

 

HIGGINS

Ó, hát - akármit. Mit szól a régi kedvenc tervéhez, a virágüzlethez? Pickering vehetne magának egy virágüzletet, annyi pénze van, mint a pelyva. (Kuncogva) Neki kell kifizetni ezt a sok kacabajkát is, ami ma este magán volt. Ha az ékszerek kölcsöndíját is beleszámítjuk, nem ússza meg kétszáz fonton alul. Hat hónappal ezelőtt mennyországban érezte volna magát, ha saját virágüzlete van. Na! Szóval minden rendben lesz. De most már csakugyan lefekszem, istentelenül álmos vagyok. De várjunk csak, miért is jöttem vissza? Már elfelejtettem.

 

LIZA

A papucsáért.

 

HIGGINS

Persze, persze. Azt vágta a fejemhez. (Kezébe veszi a papucsot, és indulna ki, mikor Eliza váratlanul feláll és megszólítja)

 

LIZA

Mielőtt elmenne, uram...

 

HIGGINS

(meglepetésében, hogy a lány "uram"-nak szólítja, elejti a papucsot) Tessék?

 

LIZA

Enyémek a ruháim, vagy Pickering ezredeséi?

 

HIGGINS

(úgy fordul vissza, mintha a leány kérdése őrültség volna) Mi a fenét csinálna velük Pickering ezredes?!

 

LIZA

Félreteheti a következő lánynak, akit majd felszednek az utcáról kísérletezésre.

 

HIGGINS

(megütközve és megsértve) Hát így gondolkozik rólunk?

 

LIZA

Hagyjuk ezt! Csak azt szeretném tudni, mi az enyém? Mert az én saját ruhámat elégették.

 

HIGGINS

Hát aztán?! Nincs jobb dolga éjszaka, mint hogy ezen morfondírozzon?

 

LIZA

Tudni akarom, mit vihetek magammal. Nem akarom, hogy utólag lopással vádoljanak.

 

HIGGINS

(mélyen sértve) Lopással! Ezt nem lett volna szabad mondania, Eliza! Ezzel árulta el, hogy nincs magában érzés.

 

LIZA

Sajnálom. Én közönséges, tanulatlan lány vagyok, s a magamfajtának jó vigyázni. Maguk meg énközöttem nem lehet szó érzésről. Kérem, mondja meg, mi az enyém, mi nem.

 

HIGGINS

(dühösen) Tőlem fölpakolhatja az egész házat. Kivéve az ékszereket. Azok kölcsönben vannak. Most meg van elégedve? (Sarkon fordul, és nagy haraggal indul kifelé)

 

LIZA

(gyönyörűséggel tölti el az eredmény, és újabb ötlete támad) Megálljon, kérem! (Leveszi ékszereit) Lesz szíves ezeket magával vinni. Nem akarom, hogy lába keljen, s aztán rajtam keressék.

 

HIGGINS

(dühöngve) Adja ide! (Eliza a kezébe nyomja) Ha nem az ékszerészé volna, azt a hálátlan száját tömném be vele! (Hanyagul zsebébe tömi az ékszereket, akaratlanul felcicomázva magát a zsebeiből kifityegő aranyláncokkal)

 

LIZA

(egy gyűrűt húz le az ujjáról) Ez a gyűrű nem az ékszerészé. Ezt az egyet maga vette nekem Brightonban. Ezt is vigye! (Higgins szenvedélyes mozdulattal a kandallóba vágja a gyűrűt, és olyan fenyegetően fordul a lány felé, hogy az, arcát eltakarva, a zongorára borul és felkiált) Ne üssön meg!

 

HIGGINS

Ne üssem meg? Gyalázatos! Hogy mer ilyet feltételezni rólam? Maga ütött meg engem! A szívem közepébe szúrt!

 

LIZA

(titkos örömmel) Hála istennek! Legalább valamit visszaadtam!

 

HIGGINS

(a legválasztékosabb hivatalos méltóságával) Maga miatt vesztettem el az önuralmamat. Nem emlékszem, hogy ez valaha eddig megtörtént volna velem. Jobbnak látom, ha ma este nem szólok többet. Lefekszem.

 

LIZA

(félvállról) Jól tenné, ha Pearce-nének írna egypár sort a kávéról, mert én nem fogok neki szólni!

 

HIGGINS

(feszesen) A fene egye meg Pearce-nét; a fene egye meg a kávét; a fene egye meg magát; (vadul) és a fene egye meg az én hülye fejemet, hogy verejtékes munkámat, sok drága erőmet és türelmemet egy ilyen szívtelen bestiára pazaroltam! (Fenséges méltósággal távozik, de mindent elront azzal, hogy dühösen becsapja maga mögött az ajtót)

 

Eliza letérdel a kandalló elé, hogy megkeresse a gyűrűt. Miután megtalálta, egy pillanatig habozik, hogy mit csináljon vele. Végül a csemegéstálba dobja, és háborgó dühvel távozik.

 

 

A lány szobájának bútorzata egy nagy ruhásszekrénnyel és egy pompázatos toalettasztallal gazdagodott. Liza most belép, felgyújtja a villanyt. Odasiet a ruhásszekrényhez, kinyitja; ruhát, kalapot, cipőt rángat elő, és az ágyra dobálja. Leveti estélyi ruháját és báli cipőjét; azután a szekrényből párnázott ruhaakasztót vesz elő, gondosan ráakasztja a ruhát, s visszatéve a szekrénybe, rácsapja az ajtót. Utcai cipőt, utcai ruhát és kalapot vesz fel. A toalettasztalról felemeli karóráját, és csuklójára erősíti. Felhúzza kesztyűjét; fogja retiküljét s mielőtt karjára venné, belepillant, hogy ott van-e a pénztárca. Indul az ajtó felé. Minden mozdulata vad elszántságról tanúskodik.

 

Egy utolsó pillantást vet a tükörbe. Önmagával szembenézve, hirtelen kiölti nyelvét, aztán leoltja a villanyt, és kilép az ajtón. Közben odalent az utcán Freddy Eynsford Hill bánatosan és szerelmesen bámul fel a második emeletre, az egyetlen világos ablakra. Az ablak elsötétül.

 

FREDDY

Jó éjszakát, te drága, drága, drága...

 

Eliza kilép a házból és döngve csapja be maga mögött a kaput.

 

LIZA

Hát maga mit keres itt?

 

FREDDY

Semmit. Itt virrasztok csaknem minden éjjel. Ez az egyetlen hely, ahol boldog vagyok. Ne nevessen ki, Doolittle kisasszony.

 

LIZA

Ne szólítson engem Doolittle kisasszonynak, hallja-e! Elég nekem annyi, hogy Liza. (Hirtelen összetörik, azután vállon ragadja a fiút) Freddy, ugye, maga nem tart szívtelen bestiának, ugye, nem?

 

FREDDY

Dehogy, dehogy, dehogy, drágaságom! Hogy is juthat ilyesmi eszébe? Hisz maga a legédesebb, legaranyosabb...

 

A fiú fejét vesztve összevissza csókolja a lányt. Eliza szeretetre szomjasan fogadja és viszonozza csókjait. Így állnak ott, egymást átölelve. Arra jön egy öregebb rendőr.

 

A RENDŐR

(megbotránkozva) No! No! No!!!

 

A fiatalok csak most döbbennek rá hirtelen, hogy mit is tettek.

 

FREDDY

Bocsánat, biztos úr, most volt az eljegyzésünk.

 

Hanyatt-homlok elfutnak mind a ketten. A rendőr fejét csóválja, eltűnődve saját szerelmi emlékein s az emberi remények hívságos voltán. Azután lassú, kimért rendőrléptekkel indul meg az ellenkező irányba.

 

A menekülő szerelmesek egyszer csak a Cavendish téren találják magukat. Megtorpannak, s körülnéznek, hogy merre is induljanak.

 

LIZA

(kifulladva) Hű, de begyulladtam ettől a zsarutól. De maga jól megfelelt neki.

 

FREDDY

Remélem, nem tartom fel? Merre indult?

 

LIZA

A folyóhoz.

 

FREDDY

És miért?

 

LIZA

Hogy beleugorjam.

 

FREDDY

(elborzadva) De drága Eliza... hogy érti ezt? Mi történt?

 

LIZA

Ne törődjön vele. Most már nem számít. Most már csak mi ketten vagyunk az egész világon, mi ketten, ugye?

 

FREDDY

Csak mi ketten!!!

 

Ismét ölelésben forrnak össze, s ismét egy rendőr lepi meg őket - ezúttal egy jóval fiatalabb.

 

A RENDŐR

No! No! Maguknak beszélek! Mi ez? Mi ez? Mit képzelnek, hol vagyunk? Na, egykettő, futólépés!

 

FREDDY

Ez az, uram: futólépés!

 

Megint futásnak erednek, s csak a Hannover téren jutnak újra szóhoz.

 

FREDDY

Sose hittem volna, hogy a rendőrök ilyen átkozottul "erkölcsösek"!

 

LIZA

Az a mesterségük, hogy szekálják a lányokat az utcán.

 

FREDDY

El kell mennünk valahova. Nem csatangolhatunk egész éjjel az utcán.

 

LIZA

Miért nem? Milyen nagyszerű volna örökké csak csatangolni... csatangolni!

 

FREDDY

Te drága!...

 

Megint összeölelkeznek, s nem veszik észre, hogy egy taxi kanyarodott oda melléjük.

 

A SOFŐR

Elvihetném valahova uraságodékat?

 

A fiatalok kibontakoznak az ölelésből.

 

LIZA

Freddy! Egy taxi! Soha jobbkor!

 

FREDDY

A fene egye meg, nincs egy vasam se.

 

LIZA

Van nekem bőven! Az ezredesnek az a bogara, hogy az embernek tíz font nélkül ki se szabad lépni az utcára. Tudja, mit? Egész éjjel összevissza kocsikázunk; reggel pedig telefonálok az öreg Higginsnének, s megkérdem, hogy mit kell tennem. Majd mindent elmesélek a taxiban. Ott próbáljon szekálni a rendőrség!

 

FREDDY

Ez az! Kolosszális! (A sofőrhöz) Wimbledonig meg se állunk. (Elhajtatnak)

 

 

 

ÖTÖDIK FELVONÁS

 

 

Higginsné szalonja. Higginsné ismét az íróasztalnál ül. Belép a szobalány.

 

SZOBALÁNY

(az ajtóból) Henry úr van lent, Pickering ezredes úrral.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Csak engedje fel őket.

 

SZOBALÁNY

Éppen telefonálnak odalent, azt hiszem, a rendőrséggel beszélnek.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Micsoda?

 

SZOBALÁNY

(beljebb lép és halkabban folytatja) Henry úr olyan állapotban van... azt gondoltam, kérem, jó lesz, ha szólok.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ha azt jelentette volna, hogy Henry úr nincs "olyan állapotban", jobban meg volnék lepve. Mondja nekik, hogy jöjjenek fel, ha végeztek a rendőrséggel. Azt hiszem, a fiam elvesztett valamit.

 

SZOBALÁNY

Igenis. (Indul)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Menjen fel Doolittle kisasszonyhoz, és mondja meg neki, hogy itt van Henry úr meg az ezredes. Kérem, hogy ne jöjjön le, amíg nem üzenek érte.

 

SZOBALÁNY

Igenis.

 

HIGGINS

(beront. Mint a szobalány is mondta, "olyan állapotban van...") Mama, ha tudnád... micsoda história!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Jó reggelt, édes fiam. (Henry legyőzi türelmetlenségét, és megcsókolja anyját, a szobalány közben kimegy) Mi történt?

 

HIGGINS

Eliza megszökött!!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(nyugodtan, folytatva az írást) Úgy látszik, megijesztetted.

 

HIGGINS

Megijesztettem? Őrültség! Tegnap este is azzal váltam el tőle, hogy oltsa el a villanyt stb. ... s ahelyett, hogy lefeküdt volna, átöltözött és kereket oldott. Az ágya meg se volt bontva. Reggel hét előtt egy taxival eljött a holmijáért, és az a tökkelütött Pearce-né kiadott neki mindent, ahelyett, hogy szólt volna! Mit tegyek most?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Attól tartok, bele kell nyugodnod. A lány teljes joggal mehet, ahova kedve tartja.

 

HIGGINS

(tanácstalanul járkál ide-oda a szobában) De semmimet sem találom. És fogalmam sincs, mit mikorra beszéltem meg? Azt sem tudom...

 

Pickering lép be. Higginsné leteszi tollát és hátrafordul.

 

PICKERING

(kézfogás közben) Jó reggelt kívánok, asszonyom, megmondta már Henry?... (Leül az ottománra)

 

HIGGINS

Mit mond az a barom rendőrtiszt? Mondtad, hogy jutalmat tűzünk ki?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(felháborodva áll fel) Csak nem akarjátok azt mondani, hogy a rendőrséggel köröztetitek Elizát?!

 

HIGGINS

Dehogynem! Hát mire való a rendőrség? És mi mást tehetnénk? (Leül az Erzsébet-kori székbe)

 

PICKERING

Rengeteget akadékoskodott az a rendőrtiszt. Már azt kell hinnem, hogy valami tisztességtelen dologgal gyanúsít bennünket.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ez csak természetes. Mi címen jelentitek föl a lányt a rendőrségen, mintha valami tolvaj lenne vagy valami elveszett esernyő? Mégiscsak sok! (Felindultan ül le)

 

HIGGINS

De hát meg akarjuk találni!

 

PICKERING

Nem engedhetjük így megszökni, asszonyom! Mit csináljunk?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Olyan éretlenek vagytok, mint két kölyök! Mondhatom, hogy...

 

Belép a szobalány, és félbeszakítja a társalgást.

 

SZOBALÁNY

Egy úr keresi a tanár urat, nagyon fontos ügyben. A Wimpole utcai lakásról küldték ide.

 

HIGGINS

Még ez kellett! Nem érek rá! Ki az?

 

SZOBALÁNY

Valami Doolittle úr.

 

PICKERING

Doolittle?! A szemetes?

 

SZOBALÁNY

Szemetes? Nem, kérem, egy úriember.

 

HIGGINS

(izgatottan ugrik fel) Esküszöm, valami rokona lehet. Talán nála van? Ez valami új rokon, akiről nem is tudunk. (A szobalányhoz) Küldje fel gyorsan.

 

SZOBALÁNY

Igenis. (El)

 

HIGGINS

(izgatottan anyjához lép) Előkelő rokonság! Mik sülnek itt ki? (Leül a Chippendale-székbe)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ismertek valakit a rokonai közül?

 

PICKERING

Csak az apját... az a jópofa, akiről beszéltünk.

 

SZOBALÁNY

(szabályosan jelenti) Doolittle úr! (El)

 

Belép Doolittle. Ragyogóan van öltözve, mint aki valami előkelő esküvőre készül - esetleg ő maga a vőlegény. Gomblyukában egy szál virág, fején fényes cilinder, lábán a finom lakkcipő. Annyira fűti látogatásának célja, hogy észre sem veszi Higginsnét. Egyenesen Higginshez megy, és heves szemrehányással ront rá.

 

DOOLITTLE

(önmagára mutat) Ide nézzen! Látja ezt? Ez a maga műve!

 

HIGGINS

Mi az én művem?

 

DOOLITTLE

Ez! Nézze ezt a cilindert! Nézze ezt a zsakettet!

 

PICKERING

Talán Eliza vett magának ruhát?

 

DOOLITTLE

Liza? Az ugyan nem! Mér vett vóna nekem ruhát?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Jó reggelt, Doolittle úr, nem ül le?

 

DOOLITTLE

(visszahőköl, amint rájön, hogy megfeledkezett a ház úrnőjéről) Már megbocsásson. (Hozzálép és megrázza feléje nyújtott kezét) Köszönöm szépen. (Ezzel leül az ottománra, Pickering jobb oldalán) Úgy tele van a fejem ezzel az egész mindenséggel, másra gondolni se tudok, csak hogy velem mi történt!

 

HIGGINS

De hát mi a fene történt magával?

 

DOOLITTLE

Ha csak arrul vóna szó, hogy úgy történt velem valami! Akkor egy szót se szólnék, az ember olyankor asszokta mondani, hogy hát ez a sorsa. De ez nemcsak úgy történt, ezt maga csinálta velem! Maga, Henry Higgins!

 

HIGGINS

Megtalálta Elizát?

 

DOOLITTLE

Mér? Elvesztette?

 

HIGGINS

El.

 

DOOLITTLE

Csuda mázlija van! Én nem találtam meg, de ő maj hamar megtalál mos, hogy maga ezt csinálta velem!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

De hát mit csinált a fiam magával, Doolittle úr?

 

DOOLITTLE

Micsinált?! Tönkretett! Tönkretette a boldogságomat! Gúzsba kötött! Megvert ezzel a középosztályos tisztességgel!

 

HIGGINS

(türelmetlenül felugrik, és megáll Doolittle előtt) Maga félrebeszél! Maga részeg. Maga őrült. Egyszer adtam magának öt fontot, azután még egyszer beszéltünk, ami óránként egy félkoronásomba került. Azóta színét se láttam.

 

DOOLITTLE

Részeg vagyok? Őrült vagyok? Egyre feleljen: igaz vagy nem igaz, hogy maga levelet írt egy félnadrág vén amerikainak, aki ötmillió fontos alapítványt tett csak arra, hogy az egész világon állíccsanak fel erkölcsi reformegyesületeket... magát meg arra szemelte ki, hogy tanájjon ki neki valami világnyelvet! Igaz, vagy nem igaz?

 

HIGGINS

Ahá! Ezra D. Wannafellert gondolja. De hisz az meghalt.

 

DOOLITTLE

Ez az, hogy meghalt! Ezzel nyomorított meg. No, igaz, vagy nem igaz, hogy maga küldött neki egy levelet, oszt abba azt írta, hogy "legjobb tudomásom szerint Angliába jelenleg a legeredetibb moralista Alfred Doolittle, egy közönséges szemetesember".

 

HIGGINS

Á, az első látogatása után, emlékszem, hogy csináltam valami buta viccet.

 

DOOLITTLE

Könnyű magának azt mondani, hogy "buta vicc". Ezzel húztak be a csőbe. "Adjunk annak az embernek lehetőséget, hogy megmutassa, mire képes; hadd lássa a világ, hogy az amerikaiak megbecsülik az érdemet a legalsóbb néposztályokban is, nem úgy, mint az angolok." Ezt írta abba az istenverte végrendeletbe. A maga buta viccinek köszönhetem, Henry Higgins, hogy abba a végrendeletbe rám testálta a Büdös Sajt Szövetkezet valami részesedésit, majdnem évi háromezer fontot - azzal az egy kikötéssel, hogy minden évben tarcsak hat előadást a Wannafeller-féle erkölcsi reformligába.

 

HIGGINS

A nyavalya törje ki őket! Pfúj! (Hirtelen felderül) Micsoda hülyeség!

 

PICKERING

Ne féljen a hat előadástól, Doolittle úr, a másodikra már nem fogják fölkérni.

 

DOOLITTLE

Bánnya a franc az előadásokat! Tartok én nekik annyit, hogy belekékülnek - az nekem meg se kottyan. Én csak az ellen kapálózok, hogy úriembert faragjanak belülem. Ki kérte őtet arra, hogy énbelülem urat csinájjon? Mer én boldog vótam, szabad vótam, mint a madár. Ha éppen péz kellett: megvágtam valakit, ahogy magát is, Henry Higgins. Most annyi a gondom, azt se tudom, hol áll a fejem; és gúzsba vagyok kötve, kérem. Most mindenki engem vág meg. Az ügyvédem aszongya, hogy jól jártam. Hogy jól, mondom neki, talán inkább maga járt jól? Amikó még szegény vótam, osztán eccer ügyvédem vót, mer hogy hát a szemetes kocsimon az ócskavas közt valami babakocsit tanátak, hát akkor az ügyvéd kihúzott a slamasztikábul, osztán lerázott a nyakárul, de legalább ő se maradt az én nyakamon. Szakasztott így vagyok a doktorokkal is: azelőtt kiakolbólítottak a kórházbul, mán mikor még lábra állni is alig tudtam, de nem kértek egy vasat se! Most eltanálták, hogy nem vagyok egészséges, hogy engem napjába kétszer vizsgágatni kell. Odahaza még a kisujjom se mozdíthatom, mindent más csinál helyettem, de jól meg is vág érte. Aztán a rokonok! Kérem, azelőtt nekem két-három rokonom vót, de azok se ismertek meg az uccán. Most van valami ötven, de alig akad köztük, aki legalább a kajára valót megkeresné. Kérem, nekem másokért kell élni; ez az úri tisztesség. Aszongya, hogy elveszett a Liza? Ne fájjon a feje. Lefogadom, hogy azóta már otthun az ajtó előtt vár, pedig azelőtt hogy megélt a nyavalyás a virágárulásbul, mikó még nem vótam előkelő. Mos gyön az, hogy maj maga is megvág, Henry Higgins. Mos maj tanúhatom magátul az úri beszédet, hogy még a nyelvem se forogjon szabadon. Mos gyön maga! Fogadjunk, hogy ezér csináta ezt az egész kalamajkát!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

De kedves Doolittle úr, semmi szükség, hogy mindezt tűrje. Senki sem kényszerítheti, hogy elfogadja az örökséget. Vissza is utasíthatja. Nem igaz, ezredes úr?

 

PICKERING

Én is azt hiszem.

 

DOOLITTLE

(kicsit szelídebben, miután asszonnyal beszél) Épp ez a tragédia, kérem. Könnyű azt mondani, hogy haggyam a pénzt a francba... de ha eccer nincs hozzá szívem? Kinek vóna a helyembe? Mer mind gyávák vagyunk. Ez az, kérem, hogy gyávák vagyunk. Mer mi lesz velem, ha visszavágom a dohányt? Mehetek a szegényházba vénkoromra. Hiszen mán festeni kellett a hajamat, hogy szemetesnek fölvegyenek. Ha afféle jámbor szegény vónék, hogy vóna spórót pézem, akkó hagyhatnám a francba az egészet. De akkó mi értelme vóna? Hiszen a jámbor szegény is éppúgy él, mint a milliomos: egyik se tuggya, mi a boldogság. De mer hogy én csak olyan lógós szegényember vótam, hát énnekem nem vót más választásom: vagy a szegényház, vagy az a rohadt háromezer. Mán megbocsásson a szóér, naccsága, maga se tunna jobbat, ha így föl vóna paprikázva, mint én. Olyan vagyok mán, mint a lik nélkül maratt egér. Jobbrul a szegényház, balrul a középosztály riogat; olyan ez, kérem, mint a Cilla meg a Karbidis. Hiába, nem bírom ideggel a szegényházat! Gyáva vagyok, vajjuk be! Lepézeltek, beadtam a derekam! Más boldog emberek viszik el a szemetemet, még jó borravalót is kivágnak belülem. Én meg maj csak bámulok rájuk mulyán, oszt sárgulok az iriccségtül. Ezt tette velem a maga fia! (Egész elöntötte az indulat)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nagyon örülök, Doolittle úr, hogy nem követett el könnyelműséget. Ezzel biztosítva van Eliza jövője. Most majd ön gondoskodhat felőle.

 

DOOLITTLE

(melankolikusan) Úgy, úgy, asszonyom. Most én gondoskodhatok mindenkirül, évi háromezerbül.

 

HIGGINS

(fölugrik) Bolond beszéd! Hogy gondoskodnék ő a lányról? Szó se lehet róla. A lány már nem az övé. Öt fontot adtam neki érte. Doolittle, tisztességes ember maga vagy gazember?

 

DOOLITTLE

(türelmesen) Egyik is, másik is, Henry, mint az emberek átajjába... Egyik is, másik is.

 

HIGGINS

Maga zsebre tette érte a pénzt. Most nincs joga elvenni tőlem a lányt!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Henry! Ne bolondulj meg! Ha tudni akarod, Eliza odafent van az én szobámban.

 

HIGGINS

(elámul) A te szobádban?!!! Már hozom is le. (Határozott léptekkel indul az ajtó felé)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(felugrik és utánaszalad) Megállj, Henry! Ülj le!

 

HIGGINS

Én...

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ülj le, édes fiam, és nyisd ki a füled.

 

HIGGINS

Jó, jó, jó, jó. (Egy kecsesnek egyáltalán nem mondható mozdulattal az ottománra veti magát, arccal az ablakok felé) Azt hiszem, ezt egy félórával ezelőtt is megmondhattad volna.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Eliza ma reggel hozzám jött. Elmondta, hogy milyen brutálisan bántatok vele tegnap este.

 

HIGGINS

(megint felszökken) Micsoda?!!!

 

PICKERING

(szintén feláll) Drága asszonyom, a leány valótlant állít. Szó sincs róla, hogy brutálisan bántunk volna vele! Alig szóltunk hozzá egy szót. És a legnagyobb békességben váltunk el tőle. (Higginshez fordul) Henry! Bántottad te a lányt valamivel, azután, hogy én lefeküdtem?

 

HIGGINS

Ellenkezőleg! Ő vágta fejemhez a papucsomat. Gyalázatosan viselkedett, pedig én a legkisebb okot sem adtam rá. A papucs az arcomba repült, mielőtt még egy szót szólhattam volna. És micsoda kiejtéssel kezdett el beszélni!

 

PICKERING

(döbbenten) De hát mért? Mit tettünk vele?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Azt hiszem, jól sejtem, mit tettetek. Persze, a leány egy kicsit érzékeny. Nem igaz, Doolittle úr?

 

DOOLITTLE

Mint a mimóza! Apja lánya.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Igen. Elizában őszinte ragaszkodás volt. Nagyon keményen dolgozott a kedvedért, Henry. Nem tudom, meggondoltad-e, mit jelent a szellemi munka egy ilyen egyszerűbb lánynak? Aztán mikor eljött a nagy nap, és ő egyetlen hiba nélkül, csodálatosan végigjátszotta a szerepét, ti szépen leültetek otthon, egy szót se szóltatok hozzá, csak arról diskuráltatok egymással: milyen jó, hogy vége van, meg milyen halálosan untátok az egészet. S ezek után csodálod, hogy fejedhez vágta a papucsodat?! Én a tüzes piszkavasat vágtam volna hozzád!

 

HIGGINS

Semmi egyebet sem mondtunk, csak azt, hogy fáradtak vagyunk, és jó volna lefeküdni. Nem igaz, Pick?

 

PICKERING

(vállat von) Semmi egyebet.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(éllel) Bizonyos ez?

 

PICKERING

Holtbiztos. Semmi másról nem volt szó.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Egy szóval se köszöntétek meg, amit tett? Egy szóval se mondtátok neki, hogy ragyogó volt, hogy csodálatos volt?

 

HIGGINS

(türelmetlenül) Ezt ő úgyis tudta. Nem vágtunk ki ünnepi szónoklatokat.

 

PICKERING

(egy kis lelkiismeret-furdalással) Meglehet, hogy kissé figyelmetlenek voltunk. Nagyon haragszik?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(visszaül íróasztalához) Attól tartok, Eliza nem fog visszatérni a Wimpole utcai lakásba. Különösen most, hogy Doolittle úr biztosíthatja neki azt a társadalmi pozíciót, amelyre ti kineveltétek. De azt mondta, szívesen fenntartja veletek a barátságot, és hajlandó elfelejteni, ami történt.

 

HIGGINS

(dühöngve) Hajlandó! Óriási!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ha megígéred, hogy rendesen viselkedsz, fiam, akkor megkérem, hogy jöjjön le. Ha nem, mehetsz haza; már úgyis elég időmet raboltad el.

 

HIGGINS

Ó, hogyne, hogyne! Hallod, Pick? Viseld magad rendesen! Vegyük fel a legjobb vasárnapi modorunkat ennek a némbernek a kedvéért, akit úgy kapartunk ki a sárból. (Duzzogva szökken az Erzsébet-kori székbe)

 

DOOLITTLE

(tiltakozva) Na, na, Henry Higgins! Ne sértse meg az én középosztályos érzésemet!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Ne felejtsd, hogy mit ígértél, Henry! (Megnyomja a csengőt) Kérem, Doolittle úr, volna olyan kedves egypár percre kilépni az erkélyre. Szeretném, ha Eliza előbb a két úrral végezne, s addig nem kavarná fel a nagy újság. Ugye, nem haragszik?

 

DOOLITTLE

Dehogy haragszok, kérem. Mindent elkövetnék, hogy Henry elüsse kezemrül a Lizát. (Kilép az erkélyre)

 

Az előbbi csengetésre megjelenik a szobalány. Pickering Doolittle helyére ül.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Kérem Doolittle kisasszonyt, hogy legyen szíves lefáradni.

 

SZOBALÁNY

Igenis. (El)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

És most, Henry, légy jó fiú!

 

HIGGINS

Mindent el fogok követni.

 

PICKERING

Mindent, ami tőle telik, asszonyom.

 

Szünet. Higgins hátraszegi fejét, kinyújtja két lábát, és fütyörészni kezd.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Henry drágám, egyáltalában nem hatsz valami festőien ebben a pózban.

 

HIGGINS

Egyáltalában nem igyekeztem festőien hatni, mama.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Nem baj, édes fiam, csak azt akartam, hogy megszólalj!

 

HIGGINS

Miért?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Mert ha beszélsz, akkor nem fütyülsz.

 

Higgins morog. Újabb súlyos, hosszú szünet.

 

HIGGINS

(türelmét vesztve felugrik) Hol az ördögbe van már az a lány? Ítéletnapig várjunk itt?

 

Belép Eliza, napsugarasan, magabiztosan, modora megdöbbentően könnyed és előkelő. Kis kézimunkakosár van nála, és láthatólag otthon érzi magát. Pickering a láttára úgy elhűl, hogy elfelejt felállni.

 

LIZA

Jó reggelt tanár úr, hogy érzi magát?

 

HIGGINS

(akadozva) Hogy... hogy... (Több nem jön ki a száján)

 

LIZA

Ragyogóan, igaz? Hisz maga sohasem beteg. Örülök, hogy látom, ezredes úr. (Pickering riadtan felugrik, és megrázza a lány kinyújtott kezét) Ma kissé hűvös a reggel, nemde? (Leül Pickering mellett, az ezredes is visszaereszkedik)

 

HIGGINS

Ne próbálja ki rajtam is ezt a trükköt. Tőlem tanulta: rajtam nem fog. Pakoljon és jöjjön! Ne bolonduljon meg!

 

Eliza kézimunkát vesz elő kosarából, és dolgozni kezd rajta, tudomást sem véve Higgins kitöréséről.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Gratulálok az ékesszólásodhoz, Henry; nincs nő, aki ellen tudna állni ilyen meghívásnak.

 

HIGGINS

Kérlek, mama, hogy most ne avatkozz bele. Hadd beszéljen ő. Egykettőre meg fogod látni, hogy nincs egyetlen gondolat a fejében, egyetlen szó a szájában, amit ne éntőlem kapott volna. Mondhatom, a sárból kapartam ki ezt a nőszemélyt! A zöldségpiacon, mint valami széttaposott káposztalevelet! És tessék: még ő játssza itt előttem a nagyvilági dámát!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Jól van, édes fiam, de nem ülnél le?

 

Higgins dühösen leül.

 

LIZA

(Pickeringhez fordul, Higginsről tudomást sem véve, és beszéd közben szorgalmasan kézimunkázik) Most, hogy a kísérletnek vége van, ezredes úr teljesen meg fog feledkezni rólam?

 

PICKERING

Hogy képzeli! Ne nevezze ezt "kísérletnek". Ebben a szóban van valami bántó...

 

LIZA

De hiszen én, a széttaposott káposztalevél...

 

PICKERING

(heves tiltakozással) De Eliza!

 

LIZA

(nyugodtan folytatja) ...én olyan sokkal tartozom magának, hogy igazán nagyon szomorú lennék, ha elfelejtene.

 

PICKERING

Nagyon kedves, hogy ezt mondja, Doolittle kisasszony.

 

LIZA

Nem azért mondom ezt, mert kifizette a ruháimat. Tudom, hogy milyen bőkezűen bánik mindenkivel. De öntől tanultam meg, hogy mi az igazi jó modor. És ez az, ami úrinővé tesz valakit. Elképzelheti, milyen nehéz helyzetben voltam én, aki mindig csak Higgins tanár úr példáját láttam magam előtt. Én ezen a példán nevelődtem: képtelen voltam uralkodni magamon, és a legcsekélyebb felindulásban is a legdurvább kifejezéseket használtam. Sohasem tudtam volna meg, hogy a jó társaságban nem így viselkednek, ha nem lett volna előttem ön.

 

HIGGINS

Na!

 

PICKERING

Ó, ez csak olyan szokás nála... Ő maga sem gondolja komolyan.

 

LIZA

Ó, én sem gondoltam komolyan, mikor virágoslány voltam; csak olyan szokás volt nálam. De látja, mégiscsak csúnya szájú voltam. Akárhogy is nézzük: ez a lényeg.

 

PICKERING

Kétségtelen. De mégiscsak ő volt az, aki megtanította magát beszélni. Mondhatom, én erre képtelen lettem volna.

 

LIZA

No igen, neki ez a mestersége.

 

HIGGINS

A szentségit!

 

LIZA

(folytatja) Ez annyi volt nekem, mint mikor az ember megtanul egy divatos táncot. Semmi több. Tudja, mivel kezdődött az én valódi nevelésem?

 

PICKERING

Mivel?

 

LIZA

(egy pillanatra abbahagyja a munkát) Azzal, mikor első nap így szólított: "Doolittle kisasszony." Ezzel kezdődött az én önbecsülésem. (Folytatja a munkát) S még mennyi apróság volt... Maga nem is emlékezhet rá, mert magának mindez természetes volt... Ahogy felállt, ahogy a kalapját letette, ahogy egy ajtót kinyitott...

 

PICKERING

Ó, ezek semmiségek...

 

LIZA

Nem, nem: ezek a dolgok mind azt mutatták, hogy maga többre tart, mint valami mosogatólányt; ámbár jól tudom, hogy maga ugyanúgy bánt volna egy mosogatólánnyal is, ha az valahogy odakerül a szalonba. Maga sohasem húzta le a cipőjét az ebédlőben, ha én ott voltam.

 

PICKERING

Ó, azt nem szabad rossznéven venni Higginstől, ő mindenütt lehúzza a cipőjét.

 

LIZA

Tudom, nem is haragszom rá. Ő így szokta meg. Igaz? De nekem épp ezért olyan kellemes volt, hogy maga nem tett így. Mert látja - eltekintve most olyasmiktől, amiket bárki könnyedén megtanulhat: öltözködés, jó kiejtés stb. - valójában mi is a különbség egy úrinő meg egy virágoslány között? Tulajdonképpen nem abban van a különbség, hogy az ember hogy viselkedik, hanem hogy az emberrel hogy viselkednek. Én Higgins professzor úr számára mindig csak virágoslány maradok, mert ő mindig úgy fog viselkedni velem, mint egy virágoslánnyal. De maga előtt úrinő lehetek, mert maga mindig úgy fog viselkedni velem, mint egy úrinővel.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Kérlek, Henry, ne csikorgasd a fogadat. Nem illik.

 

PICKERING

Igazán nagyon kedves, hogy ezt mondja, Doolittle kisasszony.

 

LIZA

Szeretném, ha mostantól Elizának szólítana.

 

PICKERING

Nagyon köszönöm - Eliza.

 

LIZA

És nagyon szeretném, ha Higgins professzor úr mostantól Doolittle kisasszonynak szólítana.

 

HIGGINS

Azt lesheti a lyukon!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Henry! Henry!

 

PICKERING

(nevetve) Miért nem adja vissza a kölcsönt? Csak rajta, rajta, nagyon jót fog tenni neki!

 

LIZA

Képtelen vagyok rá! Valamikor meg tudtam volna tenni, de ma már sehogy sem sikerülne. Maga mondta nekem egyszer, hogy ha egy gyerek idegen országba kerül, egy-két hét alatt megtanulja az új nyelvet, és elfelejti a sajátját. Látja, én ilyen idegen gyerek vagyok a maguk világában. Elfelejtettem az anyanyelvemet, már csak a maguk nyelvén tudok. Most fordítottam hátat igazán a szegénynegyednek, mikor a Wimpole utcai palotát otthagytam.

 

PICKERING

(izgatottan) No de csak visszajön hozzánk, a Wimpole utcába?! Én tudom, hogy meg fog bocsátani Henrynek...

 

HIGGINS

(felugrik) Meg fog bocsátani?!! A szentségit neki. Csak hadd menjen! Csak hadd lássa, mire megy nélkülünk. Három hét múlva újra fülig süllyed a mocsokba, ha én nem fogom a kezét.

 

Doolittle megjelenik az erkélyajtóban. Méltóságteljesen szemrehányó pillantást vetve Higginsre, igen lassan és halkan leányához közeledik, aki háttal ülve, nem veszi észre.

 

PICKERING

Javíthatatlan ember! Ugye, nincs igaza, Eliza?

 

LIZA

Nincs. Soha többet meg nem történhetnék velem. Jól megtanultam a leckémet. Egyetlenegyet ki nem tudnék ejteni a régi hangok közül. (Doolittle megérinti Eliza bal vállát, mire a lány leejti a kézimunkát, s meglátva apját ilyen szokatlanul kicsípve, teljesen megfeledkezik magáról, s valami artikulálatlan hangot hallat) A-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a!!

 

HIGGINS

(diadalmasan) Ez az! Ez az! (Utánozza) A-a-a-a-a-a-a!!! (Többször ismétli) Győztem! Győztem! (A díványra veti magát, keresztbe fonja karjait, és öntelten elterpeszkedik)

 

DOOLITTLE

Ne csúfolja. Tehet ő arrul? Ne nézz úgy rám, Liza, nem tehetek rúla: pénz állt a házhoz.

 

LIZA

Úgy látszik, papa, most az egyszer valami milliomost fejtél meg.

 

DOOLITTLE

Azt, azt. De máma amúgy is ki kellett öltöznöm. Megyek a Szent György-templomba. A mostohaanyád most vezet oltár elé.

 

LIZA

(mérgesen) Képes vagy elvenni azt a közönséges nőszemélyt?

 

PICKERING

(csitítólag) Jól teszi, Eliza. (Doolittle-hez) Hogyhogy mégis ráállt?

 

DOOLITTLE

Ő is gyáva, kérem. Meggyávult. Áldozatul esett a középosztályos tisztességnek. Tedd föl a kalapod, lányom, osztán gyere, nézd meg, hogy térek jó útra.

 

LIZA

Ha az ezredes úr úgy látja jónak, én... én... (csaknem elpityeredve) rászánhatom magamat; én kitehetem magamat a mostohám sértéseinek...

 

DOOLITTLE

Ne félj attul, lányom! Szegény asszony, nem járattya az mán a száját! Egész belerokkant a nagy tisztességbe.

 

PICKERING

(finoman megfogja Eliza könyökét) Tegye meg nekik ezt a szívességet. Vágjon hozzá jó képet.

 

LIZA

(sértettségét legyőzve, Pickeringre mosolyog) Jól van. Ne mondják, hogy haragtartó vagyok. Egy perc múlva itt leszek. (Kimegy)

 

DOOLITTLE

(leül Pickering mellé) Irtóra ideges vagyok a szertartástul, ezredes úr. Jó volna, ha velem lenne, hogy látná, hogy esek túl rajta.

 

PICKERING

De hisz már egyszer átesett rajta, öregem. Hiszen Eliza anyját is elvette.

 

DOOLITTLE

Ki mondta ezt az ezredes úrnak?

 

PICKERING

Nem mondta senki, de hát úgy gondoltam... Hiszen ez a természetes módja...

 

DOOLITTLE

Nem, ezredes úr, a' nem a természetes módja, a' csak olyan úri módja, olyan középosztályos módja. Nekem sose vót ilyen módom, mer én csak afféle lógós szegény vótam. De errül ne tessék szóni Lizának, ő nem tuggya. Nem vót szívem, hogy szójjak neki.

 

PICKERING

Nagyon helyes. Hagyjuk meg a hitében - ha így látja jónak.

 

DOOLITTLE

Aztán, ugyi, eljön velem a templomba, segít egy kicsit.

 

PICKERING

Nagyon szívesen. Már amennyire egy agglegénytől kitelik.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Elmehetek én is, Doolittle úr? Nagyon sajnálnám, ha elmulasztanám az ön esküvőjét.

 

DOOLITTLE

Igen meg teccene tisztelni vele. Szegény asszony meg éppen hogy iszonyú nagyra venné. Mán úgyis annyit kornyadozott mostanába, hogy vége a régi szép időnek!

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(felkel) Megrendelem a kocsit és felöltözöm. (A férfiak felállnak, kivéve Higginst) Negyedóra múlva kész leszek. (Amint az ajtóhoz ér, Eliza lép be kalapban, kesztyűjét gombolva) Megyek én is a templomba, Eliza, az édesapja esküvőjére. Legjobb, ha az én kocsimon jön, Pickering ezredes úr előremehet a vőlegénnyel. (Kimegy)

 

Eliza előrejön a szoba közepére, s megáll az ottomán és az ablak között. Pickering melléje lép.

 

DOOLITTLE

Vőlegény! Micsoda szó! Az ember egyszeribe rájön, hova jutott. (Fölteszi cilinderét, és megindul az ajtó felé)

 

PICKERING

Mielőtt elmennénk, Eliza, bocsásson meg Henrynek, és jöjjön vissza hozzánk.

 

LIZA

Nem hinném, hogy papi megengedi. Igaz, papi?

 

DOOLITTLE

(bánatosan, de megbocsátólag) Kibabrált veled ez a két vén vagány. Liza! Ha csak egy lett volna, azzal még el lehetett vóna bánni, de hát ketten vótak, oszt falaztak egymásnak. (Pickeringhez) Nagy róka maga, de én azér nem haragszok. Én is éppen így csinátam vóna! De engem egész életembe átejtettek a nők, kézrül kézre adtak, mint egy jó receptet. Nem morgolódok, hogy maguk nem hatták magukat, oszt kifogtak a Lizán. Én ebbe nem avatkozok bele. Itt az ideje, hogy induljunk, Pickering; no, minden jót, Henry! Viszontlátásra, Liza, a templomba! (Távozik)

 

PICKERING

(behízelgő hangon) Maradjon nálunk, Eliza! (Doolittle után megy)

 

Eliza kilép az erkélyre, hogy ne legyen kénytelen Higginsszel kettesben maradni. A férfi fölkel és utánamegy. Eliza erre azonnal visszatér a szobába, és az ajtó felé tart. De Higgins elébe vág, és háttal az ajtónak támaszkodva, elállja a lány útját.

 

HIGGINS

Nos, Eliza, visszaadta a kölcsönt, ahogy mondta. Beéri ennyivel? Észre tér valahára? Vagy még mindig nem volt elég?

 

LIZA

Csak azért akar visszahívni, hogy cipeljem maga után a papucsát. Hogy legyen kivel pörölni, meg legyen kit ide-oda szalajtani.

 

HIGGINS

Egy szóval sem mondtam, hogy vissza akarom hívni.

 

LIZA

Nem? Hát akkor miről van szó?

 

HIGGINS

Magáról! Nem pedig rólam. Ha visszajön, ugyanúgy fogok magával bánni, mint eddig. A természetemen nem tudok változtatni, a modoromon pedig nem akarok. Egyébként ugyanolyan modorom van, mint Pickering ezredesnek.

 

LIZA

Ez nem igaz. Pickering egy virágoslánnyal is úgy bánik, mint egy hercegnővel.

 

HIGGINS

Én pedig egy hercegnővel is úgy bánok, mint egy virágoslánnyal.

 

LIZA

Értem. (Nyugodtan megfordul, és leül az ottománra, arccal az ablak felé) Szóval mindenkivel egyformán.

 

HIGGINS

Úgy van.

 

LIZA

Akár az apám.

 

HIGGINS

(kissé lefőzve, elvigyorodik) Ha nem fogadom is el az összehasonlítást minden ponton, annyi bizonyos, Eliza, hogy a maga apja nem sznob, s akármibe keveri a sors játéka, ő minden helyzetben meg fog állni a lábán. Mert nem az a nagy kérdés, Eliza, hogy az embernek rossz modora van-e, vagy jó modora, az a fontos, hogy minden emberi lénnyel szemben egyforma modora legyen. Egyszóval, hogy az ember úgy viselkedjék, mint a mennyországban, ahol nincs első, második, harmadik osztály, hanem minden lélek egyforma.

 

LIZA

Ámen! Maga született prédikátor.

 

HIGGINS

(sértetten) Nem az a kérdés, hogy én gorombán bánok-e magával. Az a kérdés, halotta-e, hogy valaha bárkivel is másképp bántam?

 

LIZA

(hirtelen őszinteséggel) Törődöm is én azzal, hogy bánik velem. Azt se bánnám, ha lehordana, azt se bánnám, ha kékre verne - kaptam én már verést. De (feláll és a férfi szemébe néz) nem tűröm, hogy átgázoljon rajtam!

 

HIGGINS

Akkor térjen ki az utamból. Mert én meg nem állok a maga kedvéért. Úgy beszél itt rólam, mintha valami autóbusz volnék.

 

LIZA

Az is: autóbusz! Csak pöfög, robog, és nem törődik senkivel. Boldogulok én maga nélkül is. Ne higgye, hogy nem.

 

HIGGINS

Egy percig sem hiszem. Én mondtam, hogy egyedül is boldogulni fog.

 

LIZA

(sebzett önérzettel otthagyja, átmegy az ottomán másik oldalára, arccal a kandalló felé fordul) Igen, maga mondta. Vadállat. Le akart rázni a nyakáról.

 

HIGGINS

Hazudik.

 

LIZA

Köszönöm szépen. (Méltóságteljesen leül)

 

HIGGINS

Magának, persze, sohasem jutott eszébe, hogy én boldogulok-e maga nélkül?

 

LIZA

(komolyan) Ne akarjon levenni a lábamról. Nélkülem kell boldogulnia.

 

HIGGINS

(kihívóan) Én bárki nélkül boldogulok. Mert nekem saját lelkem van; egy szikra az isteni tűzből, de (hirtelen alázattal) hiányozni fog, Eliza. (Leül közel a lányhoz, az ottománra) Tanultam egyet-mást a maga buta bemondásaiból; ezt alázatosan és hálásan bevallom. És megszoktam a hangját meg az arcát. Mondhatom, megkedveltem mind a kettőt.

 

LIZA

Mind a kettő megmarad magának: a hangom a lemezeken, az arcom a fényképeken. Ha egyedül érzi magát, csak fel kell húznia a gramofont, annak legalább nincsenek érzései, és nem lehet megbántani.

 

HIGGINS

A lelkét nem húzhatom fel. Hagyja meg nekem az érzéseit, s elviheti a hangját meg az arcát - az nem maga.

 

LIZA

Maga rosszabb az ördögnél! Úgy tudja facsarni az áldozat szívét, ahogy más a karját. Pearce-né óvott is engem. Ő is folyton ott akarta hagyni magát, de az utolsó percben valamivel mindig levette a lábáról. Pedig maga nem törődik vele. És velem se törődik.

 

HIGGINS

Én az emberiséggel törődöm. Maga ennek egy tagja, aki az utamba került, akit fölemeltem és kineveltem. Mi egyebet kívánhat tőlem maga vagy bárki más?

 

LIZA

Én nem törődöm azzal, aki nem törődik velem.

 

HIGGINS

Üzleti elvek, hoci-nesze, mint a "kőrút" sarkán. (A körutat hosszú ő-vel mondja, szakértően utánozva a műveletlen kiejtést)

 

LIZA

Ne csúfoljon. Ez durvaság.

 

HIGGINS

Én soha életemben nem csúfoltam senkit. A csúfolódás eltorzítja az arcot és a lelket. Én csak őszintén kifejeztem, hogy utálom és megvetem az ilyen üzletesdit. Érzelmekről nem vagyok hajlandó alkudozni. Maga vadállatnak nevez, mert nem tudott elbűvölni azzal, hogy orrom elé rakta a papucsaimat és megkereste a szemüvegemet. Elég bolond volt. Egy nő, aki papuccsal szaladgál a férfi után, gusztustalan látvány. Én se szaladgáltam a maga papucsával. Sokkal jobb véleménnyel vagyok magáról, mióta fejemhez vágta azt a két papucsot. Mi értelme rabszolgámmá lenni, és aztán azt várni, hogy törődjem magával! Ki törődik egy rabszolgával? Ha visszajön, jöjjön vissza az őszinte barátságért. Semmi egyebet nem fog kapni. Magának százszor annyi haszna volt belőlem, mint nekem magából; de ha kiskutya módra sündörög körülöttem a papucsaimmal, és lealázza Eliza hercegnőt, az én teremtményemet, akkor bevágom az ajtót az orra előtt.

 

LIZA

Miért csinált belőlem hercegnőt, ha nem törődött velem?

 

HIGGINS

(őszintén) Mert ez a mesterségem.

 

LIZA

Sohasem gondolt arra, hogy mennyi kellemetlenséget fog okozni nekem?

 

HIGGINS

Az isten sem teremtette volna meg a világot, ha arra gondolt volna, hogy mennyi kellemetlenséget fog okozni ezzel. Aki életet teremt, kellemetlenséget is teremt. A kellemetlenségeket csak egyféleképpen lehet elkerülni, ha kiirtjuk az életet. Figyelje meg, hogy a gyávák mindig is azt ordítják: a kellemetlen embereket ki kell irtani.

 

LIZA

Én nem vagyok filozófus, én nem veszem észre az ilyen dolgokat. Én csak azt veszem észre, hogy maga engem nem vesz észre.

 

HIGGINS

(felugrik és türelmetlenül járkálni kezd) Maga buta liba! Eltékozlom legdrágább szellemi kincseimet, mikor maga elé szórom. Egyszer s mindenkorra értse meg, hogy én megyek a magam útján, végzem a magam dolgát, és fütyülök arra, mi történik magával vagy velem! Én nem lettem gyáva, mint a maga apja meg a mostohaanyja. Visszajöhet - vagy mehet a pokolba, ahogy tetszik.

 

LIZA

Miért menjek vissza?

 

HIGGINS

(egy ugrással az ottománra térdel és áthajol hozzá) Mulatságból. Én is mulatságból szedtem föl.

 

LIZA

(elfordított arccal) És holnap kidobhat, ha nem teszem meg minden kívánságát.

 

HIGGINS

Igen. És maga holnap faképnél hagyhat, ha én nem teszem meg minden kívánságát.

 

LIZA

És mehetek a mostohaanyámhoz.

 

HIGGINS

Vagy árulhat virágot.

 

LIZA

Bárcsak visszamehetnék a virágkosaramhoz! Akkor független lennék magától, az apámtól, mindenkitől! Mért vette el a függetlenségemet? Miért is mondtam le róla?! Most rabszolga vagyok a legszebb ruhámban is!

 

HIGGINS

Szó sincs róla. Lányommá fogadom és pénzt íratok magára, ha kívánja. Vagy inkább feleségül menne Pickeringhez?

 

LIZA

(szikrázó szemmel néz rá) Magához se mennék feleségül, pedig maga jobban illik hozzám korban, mit a Pickering.

 

HIGGINS

(szelíden) Mint Pickering, nem mint a Pickering.

 

LIZA

(türelmét vesztve ugrik fel) Úgy beszélek, ahogy nekem teccik! Mosmá nem tanárom.

 

HIGGINS

(elgondolkozva) Nem, mégse hiszem, hogy Pickering elvenné. Ő is éppoly megrögzött agglegény, mint én.

 

LIZA

Nem is arra vágyom. Ne gondolja! Vannak, akik két kézzel kapnának rajtam, ha hozzájuk mennék. Freddy napjában kétszer, háromszor irkál nekem tízoldalas leveleket.

 

HIGGINS

(roppant kellemetlenül van meglepve) Szemtelen fráter! (Az ottománon térdelve visszahőköl, és hirtelen a két sarkára ül)

 

LIZA

Joga van hozzá szegény fiúnak, ha szeret. Márpedig szeret.

 

HIGGINS

(fölkel az ottománról) De magának nincs joga bátorítani.

 

LIZA

Minden lánynak joga van ahhoz, hogy szeressék.

 

HIGGINS

Ilyen hülyék, mint Freddy?

 

LIZA

Freddy nem hülye. Lehet, hogy gyenge és jelentéktelen, de vágyik rám, és valószínűleg boldogabbá fog tenni, mint egy bölcs, aki folyton kínoz engem, és nem vágyik rám.

 

HIGGINS

Tud ő magából faragni valamit? Ez a kérdés!

 

LIZA

Talán majd én faragok valamit őbelőle. Különben sose gondoltam arra, hogy egymást farigcsáljuk. Maga egyébre se tud gondolni. Én meg egyszerűen csak az akarok lenni, aki vagyok.

 

HIGGINS

Egyszóval: csak arra vágyik, hogy úgy táncoljak bolond módra maga körül, mint Freddy. Eltaláltam?

 

LIZA

Nem. Magától nem ezt várom. Ne gondolja, hogy olyan nagyon jól ismer. Lehettem volna én rossz lány is, ha akartam volna. Sok mindent tudok én, amit maga nem tanulhatott meg a könyveiből. Egy ilyen lány, mint én, könnyen ágyba tud csalni egy férfit, ha éppen akarja. De annak csak az a vége, hogy másnap már egymás halálát kívánják.

 

HIGGINS

Úgy van! De hát akkor mi a fittyfenének vitatkozunk itt?

 

LIZA

(nagyon felindultan) Én egy kis kedvességre vágyom. Tudom, hogy én közönséges, tudatlan lány vagyok, maga pedig tudós úriember. De nem vagyok a maga kapcarongya. Én nem azé tanútam - (kijavítja magát) nem azért tanultam, mert ruhákat kaptam meg autón járhattam: azért tanultam, mert jó haver... jó barátom kezdett lenni, meg én is törődni kezdtem magával - nem azért, hogy elcsavarjam a fejit, nem is azért, hogy dörgölőzzem magához, hanem igazi barátságból.

 

HIGGINS

Nahát akkor! Én is épp ezt érzem. És Pickering is. Maga szamár!

 

LIZA

Én nem ezt a választ vártam. (Sírva rogy le az íróasztal melletti székre)

 

HIGGINS

Éntőlem pedig nem kap másmilyet, amíg ilyen buta marad. Ha művelt nő akar lenni, akkor ne nyavalyogjon, hogy elhanyagolják és mellőzik, csak azért, mert a férfiak nem töltik fele életüket azzal, hogy a keblén pityeregnek, fele életüket meg azzal, hogy kékre verik. Ha az én életmódom hűvös és szigorú, akkor tessék, bújjon vissza a pocsolyába. Dolgozzon látástól vakulásig, mint egy barom, aztán szeretkezzen, verekedjen, igya le magát és aludjon el tökrészegen! Ez élet! A pocsolya, ez igen! Zaftos, meleg, íze van, szaga van - de jó benne fetrengeni, élvezkedni, nem kell hozzá tanulni semmit! Nem olyan, mint a művészet, tudomány, irodalom, filozófia, klasszikus zene! Hideg vagyok? Érzéketlen? Önző? Rendben van: menjen azok közé, akik jobban megfelelnek a gusztusának! Menjen férjhez egy szentimentális disznóhoz vagy egy pénzes pasashoz - fő, hogy legyen két vastag ajka, amivel csókol, meg két vastag cipője, amivel rugdos. Ha nem tudja megbecsülni, amit kapott, akkor kapjon azon, amit meg tud becsülni!

 

LIZA

(elkeseredetten) Micsoda szívtelen zsarnok maga! Én nem tudok beszélni magával. Minden szavam ellenem fordítja: soha sincs igazam. De maga mégis nagyon jól tudja, hogy csak szájhős. Nagyon jól tudja, hogy nem bújhatok vissza a "pocsolyába" , ahogy maga hívja - és nincs más barátom a világon, csak maga meg az ezredes. Nagyon jól tudja, hogy nem tudnék együtt élni egy közönséges, műveletlen emberrel, azok után, hogy maguknál éltem. Sértés, gonoszság, kegyetlenség, hogy ezt képzeli rólam! Maga azt hiszi, hogy kénytelen leszek visszatérni magukhoz, mert sehová sincs mennem, csak az apámékhoz. De ne higgye, hogy a lábánál heverek, hogy rajtam taposhat, agyonprédikálhat! Feleségül fogok menni Freddyhez: igenis, mihelyt el tudom tartani.

 

HIGGINS

(mint akit villámcsapás ért) Freddyhez?!!! Ahhoz a taknyoshoz, ahhoz a hülyéhez! Ahhoz a szerencsétlen balekhez, akit még kifutónak se vennének fel, ha egyáltalán volna mersze jelentkezni. Hát nem érti, hogy én magát királynénak neveltem?!

 

LIZA

Freddy szeret. És ez elég, hogy az én királyom legyen. Nem is kívánom, hogy dolgozzon, nem arra nevelték. Én fogok dolgozni: tanítani fogok.

 

HIGGINS

Mit akar tanítani, az isten szerelmére?!

 

LIZA

Azt, amit magától tanultam: fonetikát.

 

HIGGINS

Ha! Ha! Ha!

 

LIZA

Beállok asszisztensnek ahhoz a szőrös képű professzorhoz, aki az estélyen úgy megcsodálta a kiejtésemet, hogy azt se tudta, hova tegyen.

 

HIGGINS

(dühbe gurul és felugrik) Micsoda? Beállna ahhoz a kontárhoz? Ahhoz a szélhámoshoz? Ahhoz a talpnyaló tökfilkóhoz? Elárulná neki a módszeremet? A felfedezéseimet? Ha csak közeledni mer hozzá, kitekerem a nyakát! (Megragadja) Hallja?!!!

 

LIZA

(kihívón nem áll ellent) Csak tekerje ki. Mit bánom én? Tudtam, hogy egyszer meg fog verni. (Higgins elereszti, s közben majd szétveti a düh, hogy ismét megfeledkezett magáról; olyan hirtelen hőköl hátra, hogy megtántorodik, és az ottománra ül) Ahá! Há! Most már tudom, mi kell magának! Milyen hülye voltam, hogy eddig erre nem gondoltam! Azt nem veheti vissza, amire megtanított! Azt mondta, hogy még finomabb hallásom van, mint magának. Meg hogy jobban tudok bánni az emberekkel, mint maga. Ha-há! Most kikészül Henry Higgins! (Szándékosan beszél csúnyán, hogy bosszantsa Higginst) Mehet a francba a nagy dumájával (ujjával csettint), ennyit se ér vele! Kiíratom az újságokba, hogy a maga hercegnője utcasarki virágoslány, akit maga tanított be - és hogy a virágoslány hajlandó akárkiből ugyanígy hercegnőt csinálni, hat hónap alatt, ezer guinea-ért. Jaj, ha arra gondolok, hogy a lába alatt fetrengtem, hogy taposott, szapult, mikor csak a kisujjamat kellett volna mozdítanom, hogy éppen olyan ember legyek, mint maga... Szét tudnám verni a fejemet!

 

HIGGINS

(elámulva nézi) Azt a pimasz mindenit magának! De jól van: ez többet ér, mint a bőgés, meg a papucshordozás, meg a szemüvegkeresgélés. (Fölkel) Esküszöm, többet ér! Eliza! Azt mondtam, hogy nőt faragok magából; hát faragtam is! Látja, így már tetszik!

 

LIZA

Persze! Most aztán curukkol, mert látja, hogy nem félek magátul, megállok a magam lábán is.

 

HIGGINS

Hát persze, maga csacsi! Öt perccel ezelőtt még olyan volt, mint egy malomkő a nyakamban. Most pedig olyan, mint egy rendíthetetlen bástya - egy szövetséges hadihajó! Maga, én meg Pickering mától: három szövetséges agglegény! Nem két férfi meg egy buta liba.

 

Belép Higginsné, az esküvőhöz öltözve. Eliza egy pillanat alatt ismét hűvös és előkelő lesz.

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Vár a kocsi, Eliza. Készen van?

 

LIZA

Hogyne. Jön a tanár úr is?

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Szó sincs róla. Ő nem tudja, hogy kell templomban viselkedni. Állandóan hangos megjegyzéseket tesz a pap kiejtésére.

 

LIZA

Akkor mi már nem találkozunk, tanár úr. Isten vele. (Az ajtóhoz megy)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

(fiához megy) Isten veled, fiam.

 

HIGGINS

Isten veled, mama. (Éppen meg akarja csókolni, de hirtelen abbahagyja a mozdulatot) Most jut eszembe, Eliza... hozasson sonkát meg trappista sajtot, lesz szíves? És vegyen nekem egy pár szarvasbőr kesztyűt - nyolcasat -, és egy nyakkendőt ehhez az új ruhához. A színt magára bízom. (Kedves, gondtalan, vidám hangja elárulja, hogy javíthatatlan)

 

LIZA

(megvetően) Nyolcas kesztyű magának kicsi, ha kötött bélést is akar bele. Új nyakkendője három is van, csak a mosdóasztal fiókjában felejtette. Pickering ezredes jobban szereti az ementálit, mint a trappistát, maga pedig észre sem veszi, mit eszik. A sonka ügyében már reggel telefonáltam Pearce-nének. El sem tudom képzelni, mit fog csinálni nélkülem. (Kilibeg)

 

HIGGINSNÉ

Attól tartok, elkapattad ezt a lányt, fiam. Nyugtalanítana a kettőtök sorsa, ha Eliza nem szeretné annyira Pickering ezredest.

 

HIGGINS

Pickeringet?! Szamárság! Freddy kapja meg! Á! Há! Freddy! Freddy! Hahahaha!!!!

 

Viharosan hahotázik, miközben legördül a függöny.

 

 

Ami még hátra van, azt fölösleges eljátszani, s elmondani is igazán fölösleges volna, ha elcsenevészedett fantáziánk nem ragaszkodnék olyan tehetetlenül ahhoz az iparilag gyártott, s bőven raktáron tartott tucat "happy end"-hez, mellyel minden történetet úgy el szoktak fuserálni. Nos, Eliza Doolittle esete, bár a valószínűtlennek tetsző átváltozás miatt regényesnek tartják, valójában mindennapi história. Száz meg száz bátor és becsvágyó fiatal nő lepte meg a világot efféle átváltozással, mióta Nell Gwynne példát mutatott nemének, királynékat játszva és királyokat hódítva abban a színházban, hol narancsárus-lányként kezdte. Különféle emberek széltében-hosszában mégis azt képzelik, hogy Liza csak azért, mert egy regényes kis történet hősnője lett, bizonyára férjhez ment a hőshöz. Ez tűrhetetlen. Nemcsak azért, mert az ilyen együgyű elképzelés tönkretenné Liza kis drámáját, hanem azért is, mert a valódi végkifejlet nyilvánvaló mindenki számára, aki csak kicsit is ismeri az emberi természetet, de kivált a női ösztönt.

Mikor Liza azt mondta Higginsnek, hogy ha megkérné, sem menne hozzá feleségül, nem kacérkodott vele, hanem igen jól megfontolt döntést adott tudtára. Ha egy legényember tanít egy lányt, ha uralkodik rajta, s érdekes és fontos lesz a szemében, mint Higgins Liza szemében, akkor a lány - ha elég erős jellem - alaposan meggondolja, megfogja-e férjnek ezt a férfit. Kivált, ha a férfi oly keveset törődik házassággal, hogy egy talpraesett, elszánt nőszemélynek igazán nem nehéz megkaparintani - épp csak akarnia kell. A lány döntése jórészt attól fog függeni, hogy valóban szabad-e a választásban. Ez pedig a lány korától és anyagi helyzetétől függ. Ha már benne van a korban, s nincs biztosítva a megélhetése, hozzá fog menni a férfihoz, mert mindenképpen férjhez kell mennie valakihez, aki gondoskodik róla. De Liza korában egy csinos lány nem érzi magát ilyen szorítóban: szabadon akar szétnézni és választani. Éppen ezért az ösztönére bízza magát. Liza ösztöne pedig azt súgja, hogy ne menjen férjhez Higginshez. Persze nem azt, hogy mondjon le róla. Semmi kétség, hogy Liza számára, élete végéig, Higgins marad a legizgalmasabb emberek egyike. Igen fájdalmasan érintené Lizát, ha akadna más nő, aki az ő helyét elfoglalhatná Higgins életében. De mert e tekintetben nyugodt, nem habozik egy cseppet sem. Nem haboznék még akkor sem, ha nem volna kettőjük közt a húsz év korkülönbség - nagy idő egy fiatal lány szemében!

De minthogy saját ösztönünk még nem mondott áment Liza döntésére: lássuk most, nem találunk-e abban mi magunk is némi bölcsességet? Mikor Higgins azzal magyarázta a fiatal nők iránti érzéketlenségét, hogy valamennyinek verhetetlen vetélytársa az ő édesanyja, ezzel már meg is fejtette a maga megrögzött agglegény voltának titkát. Az ilyen eset csak annyira ritka, amennyire a rendkívüli anyák ritkák. Ha egy tehetséges fiúnak az anyja elég gazdag, s van benne intelligencia, egyéni báj s jellemerő - durvaság nélkül -, ha még emellett van benne kiművelt ízlés kora legjobb művészete iránt, hogy otthonát széppé tegye, akkor ez az anya olyan példaképet állít fia elé, mellyel csak igen kevés nő mérkőzhet sikerrel. S mindezzel öntudatlanul arra ösztönzi fiát, hogy az gyengéd érzelmeit, szépérzékét, idealizmusát különválassza kizárólag szexuális vágyaitól. Így azután a fiú örök talány marad annak a sok műveletlen embernek szemében, ki ízléstelen otthonban közönséges vagy éppen kiállhatatlan szülők keze alatt nőtt fel; mert az ilyenek számára irodalom, festészet, szobrászat, zene s minden gyengéd emberi kapcsolat csak mint szexuális komédia jöhet szóba - ha egyáltalán szóba jöhet. A "szenvedély" sem jelent számukra egyebet. Az, hogy Higgins szenvedélye a fonetika, s hogy Liza helyett anyját idealizálja, az ilyenek szemében valami képtelen és természetellenes dolog. Pedig ha körülnézünk s látjuk, hogy alig akad férfi vagy nő olyan csúnya és kiállhatatlan, aki élettársat ne kapna, ha akar - miközben annyi vénlány és agglegény értékesebb és kulturáltabb az átlagnál - ha mindezt látjuk, nehezen tudunk szabadulni ama gyanútól, hogy a szexualitás különválasztása mindattól, amivel lépten-nyomon összetévesztik - e tisztázás, melyet nagy szellemek ragyogó lelki analízissel érnek el - olykor egy szülői igézet műve.

Liza persze képtelen lett volna így megmagyarázni magának Higgins határtalanul szívós ellenállóerejét azzal a női bájjal szemben, mely első látásra megbabonázta Freddyt. Ösztönösen mégis megérezte, hogy sohasem tudna odafurakodni fiú és anyja közé (márpedig ez minden feleség elsőrendű tennivalója). Röviden, Liza rájött, hogy valami titokzatos oknál fogva Higgins nem jó férjanyag: nem az ő embere, mert nem az a férfi, ki leggyengédebb, legmelegebb, legbizalmasabb érzéseit neki tartja fenn. Ha nem lett volna ott vetélytársul az anya, akkor is visszautasította volna olyan ember érdeklődését, akinek életében ő csak a tudomány után következhet. Mert ha meghal is Higginsné, megmarad Milton és a fonetikus ábécé. Lizát bajosan nyerte volna meg Landor ama híres megjegyzésével, hogy a szerelem épp a leghatalmasabb szeretők szemében másodrendű ügy. S vegyük hozzá mindehhez a lány ellenszenvét Higgins zsarnoki fölényeskedése iránt, bizalmatlanságát, melyet kezdettől felkeltett a tanár szemfényvesztő hízelgése s állandó kisiklása az ő dühös lázongásai elől, végül is be fogjuk látni: jó ösztön óvta Lizát, nehogy feleségül menjen az ő Pygmalionjához.

De kihez ment hát feleségül Liza? Mert Higgins ugyan született agglegény, de Liza aztán legkevésbé sem született vénlánynak. Nos, a választ röviden meg lehet adni azoknak, kik még nem találták ki a lány szavaiból.

Rögtön azután, hogy Liza a vita hevében kimondja jól megfontolt elhatározását - sohasem fog férjhez menni Higginshez -, rögtön ezután említi az ifjú Frederick Eynsford Hill urat, ki naponként elárasztja szerelmes levelekkel. Freddy fiatal, jó húsz évvel fiatalabb Higginsnél. Ezenkívül talpig úriember (Lizával szólva, "klasszikus tag"), s ez minden szaván megérzik. Jól is öltözik. Az ezredes mint egyenrangút kezeli. Végül pedig Freddy őszintén szereti a lányt, nem "ura és parancsolója": úgy látszik születési előnyei ellenére sem fog uralkodni rajta. Lizának semmi érzéke ahhoz az ostoba romantikus tradícióhoz, mely szerint a nők imádják, ha uralkodnak rajtuk, vagy éppen jól meggyötrik, jól megverik őket. "Ha asszonyhoz mégy, ne feledd az ostort" - mondja Nietzsche. Okos despoták sohasem korlátozták e metódust csupán az asszonyokra: nem feledték otthon az ostort akkor sem, ha férfiakkal volt dolguk. S a férfiak, kik felett az ostor pattogott, szolgalelkűen istenítették urukat - sokkal inkább, mint az asszonyok. Semmi kétség: szolgalelkű nők éppúgy akadnak, mint szolgalelkű férfiak. S a nők, csakúgy, mint a férfiak, bámulják azt, aki erősebb náluk. De más dolog bámulni az erőst, s más dolog a járma alatt élni. Azt, aki gyenge, nem bámulják s nem imádják hősként, de nem is utálják, s nem is kerülik. A gyengéknek semmi nehézségük sem szokott lenni, ha olyannal akarnak házasságra lépni, ki náluk jóval többet ér. Veszedelmes helyzetekben elbukhatnak; de az élet nem csupa veszedelem, inkább olyan helyzetek láncolata, melyekhez nem kell különösebb erő: elbírja a gyengébb is, ha erős élettárs áll mellette. Így hát mindenki számára érthető és közismert dolog, hogy erős alkatok - nők, férfiak egyaránt - nemcsak hogy nem keresnek házastársul még erősebbet, de barátaikat sem az erősek közül válogatják. Ha egy oroszlán nála is nagyobb hangon üvöltő oroszlánnal találkozik, "az első oroszlán pokolba kívánja a másodikat". Az olyan férfi vagy olyan asszony, aki két ember erejét érzi magában, mindent inkább kíván a párjától, mint erőt.

Ennek a fordítottja éppúgy igaz. A gyengék vágynak az erős pár után - feltéve, hogy az nem rémíti meg őket túlságosan. Így esnek gyakran abba a hibába, melyről a közmondás szól: "Sokat akar a szarka, de nem bírja a farka." Túl sokat kérnek és túl keveset kínálnak. S ha tűrhetetlenül irreális az üzlet, az egyezség lehetetlen: a gyengébb felet vagy otthagyja az erősebb, vagy keresztként viseli, ami még rosszabb. Akik nemcsak gyengék, de bolondok vagy együgyűek is, gyakran kerülnek ilyen nehéz helyzetbe.

Nos, ha ilyen az emberi természet, merre fog megindulni Liza, keresztúton állva Freddy és Higgins között? Vajon arra szánja-e magát, hogy egy életen keresztül cipelje a papucsot Higgins után, vagy arra, hogy őutána cipelje a papucsot Freddy egy életen keresztül? Nem nehéz kitalálni a megfejtést. Feltéve, hogy Freddy biológiailag nem visszataszító Liza számára, s feltéve, hogy Higgins biológiailag nem oly mértékben vonzó, hogy ez a lányban minden más ösztönt elhallgattasson: a két férfi közül Freddyt fogja választani.

Liza így is tett.

Persze merültek fel nehézségek; de nem érzelmiek, hanem anyagiak. Freddynek nem volt sem pénze, sem állása. Anyjának kegydíja, a hajdani vagyon utolsó emléke csak arra volt elegendő, hogy az özvegy kellő méltósággal viselje sorsát Earlscourtban, de arra már nem, hogy bármilyen jobb intézetben neveltesse gyermekeit, vagy éppen valami foglalkozásra taníttassa ki fiát. Egy heti harminc shillinges hivatalnoki állást Freddy méltóságán alulinak tartott volna, s amellett felettébb undorítónak. Váltig abban reménykedett, hogy ha tartja a nívót, valamit majd csak tesznek érte. Mi ez a valami? Freddy homályos elképzelése szerint talán egy magántitkári állás, vagy más ilyesféle szinekúra. Anyja ábrándja inkább egy gazdag lány volt, aki nem tud ellenállni az ő Freddy fia elragadó bájának. Képzeljük el a mama érzelmeit, mikor Freddy feleségül vesz egy virágáruslányt, akit csak a sors szeszélye ragadott ki osztályából, hírhedten kalandos körülmények között!

Igaz, hogy Liza helyzete nem egészen megvetendő. Apja - bár azelőtt szemetes volt, s szintén csak egy vakeset vetette felszínre - hallatlanul népszerű lett a legfinomabb körökben, hála annak a minden nehézségen és előítéleten diadalmaskodó társadalmi tehetségének. A középosztály nem fogadta be - attól különben a háta is borsózott -, de egy csapásra meghódította a legelőkelőbb társaságot eredeti szellemével, szemetesmúltjával (melyet zászlóként lobogtatott), s a "túl jón és rosszon" nietzschei bölcsességével. Szűk körű hercegi ebédeken rendesen a hercegné jobbján foglalt helyet. Vidéki kastélyokban szívesen eldohányozgatott kint a tálalószobában (a pohárnok ilyenkor nem tudott hová lenni a nagy megtiszteltetéstől); ha pedig odabent a fehér asztal mellett lakmározott, miniszterek kérték ki erről-arról a véleményét. De minderre Doolittle csaknem oly kevésnek találta az évi háromezret, mint Eynsford Hillné az earlscourti életre a maga sokkal kisebb, siralmasan kisebb járadékát (meg sem merem mondani, mennyit!). Egyszóval, Doolittle kereken megtagadta, hogy csak egy lyukas vasat is adjon a lánya eltartására.

Így aztán Freddy meg Liza - illetve most már Eynsford Hill úr és Eynsford Hillné úriasszony - éhkoppon maradtak volna a mézeshetek alatt, ha az ezredes meg nem lepi Lizát ötszáz font nászajándékkal. Ez a pénz jó ideig tartott, Freddy nem értett hozzá, hogy elverje (hisz sosem volt elvernivaló pénze), Liza pedig, akit két öreg legény nevelt a társas életre, addig hordta ruháit, míg el nem szakadtak vagy el nem piszkolódtak, egy szemet sem törődve a havonként változó divattal. De hát ötszáz font mégsem tart örökké egy fiatal pár kezén. Tudták ezt ők mind a ketten; s Liza érezte, hogy végül is meg kell fogni valahogy a dolog végét. Persze ellakhatott volna a Wimpole utcai lakásban, hisz az már otthonává lett; de tudta, hogy nem volna helyes Freddyt odaköltöztetni, s hogy ez nem is tenne jót a fiú jellemének.

Nem mintha a két öreg legény tiltakozott volna a dolog ellen. Mikor Liza tanácsot kért, Higgins nem is volt hajlandó foglalkozni a lakáskérdéssel, olyan egyszerűnek látta a kézenfekvő megoldást. Lizának az a vágya, hogy Freddyvel együtt lakjék, semmivel sem érdekelte jobban, mint ha a lány azt kérte volna, hogy a hálószobájába állítsanak be egy új bútort. A Freddy jelleméről szóló elmélkedés, az a vélemény, hogy a fiú számára morális kötelesség a kenyérkereset, Higginsnél süket fülekre talált. Ő azt mondta, hogy Freddynek nincs is semmiféle jelleme, s ha bármi hasznos dolgot próbálna végezni, csak annak gondját szaporítaná, akinek az elfuserált munkát helyre kéne hozni. Ez pedig csak kárára volna a társadalomnak, és boldogtalanságára Freddynek magának. Hiszen Freddyt nyilván az anyatermészet is afféle könnyű munkára szánta, mint Liza szórakoztatása (ami különben, Higgins véleménye szerint, sokkal hasznosabb és becsületesebb foglalkozás, mint valami hivatali munka). Ha Liza vissza-visszatért eredeti tervéhez, hogy ő is fonetikatanár lesz, Higgins éppoly hévvel tiltakozott ellene, mint első alkalommal. Azt mondta, hogy Liza tízévi stúdium nélkül ne is álmodjon arról, hogy az ő nagyszerű szakmájába avatkozzék. Minthogy pedig ezzel nyilván az ezredes is egyetértett, Liza úgy érezte, ebben a nehéz küzdelemben le kell tennie a fegyvert. Nem is találta volna jogosnak, hogy Higgins beleegyezése nélkül hasznosítsa a tőle kapott tudást. Az ő szemében ez a tudás éppúgy Higgins tulajdona volt, mint, mondjuk egy zsebóra: Liza semmiképpen sem volt kommunista. Rajongva ragaszkodott két mesteréhez, házassága után még őszintébben és melegebben, mint azelőtt.

Végül is, sok nehéz fejtörés után, az ezredes oldotta meg a kérdést. Egy napon kissé pirulva kérdezte meg Lizát, vajon végleg letett-e arról a tervéről, hogy virágüzletet nyisson. Liza azt felelte, hogy gondolt ő erre, de aztán kiverte fejéből, mert az ezredes azon a bizonyos napon, Higginsné szalonjában, úgy nyilatkozott, hogy szó sem lehet róla. Az ezredes megvallotta, hogy mikor ezt a kijelentést tette, még teljesen az előző nap felkavaró élményeinek hatása alatt volt. Mindjárt este felvetették hát az ötletet Higgins előtt. A tanár csak egy megjegyzést tett, de abból majdnem komoly összezördülése támadt Lizával. Higgins ugyanis azt találta mondani, hogy Liza Freddyben megtalálta az ideális kifutófiút.

Hamarosan Freddyt is megkérdezték a dologról. Ő azt felelte, maga is gondolt már egy boltra; bár nagy pénztelenségében mindig csak afféle kis butikról mert álmodni, ahol egyik pultnál Liza árulja a cigarettát, másiknál meg ő az újságot. De megjegyezte, hogy szerinte is elragadó volna naponta korán reggel Lizával együtt virágot összevásárolni a Covent Garden piacán, ahol annak idején először látták meg egymást. Jutalmul ezért a megjegyzésért Liza összevissza csókolta férjét. Freddy hozzátette még, hogy ő maga sohasem mert volna ilyen javaslattal előállni, mert Clara nagy patáliát fog rendezni, ha efféle boltossággal csökkenti az ő férjhezmenési esélyeit. Azt meg éppen nem lehet várni - vélte Freddy -, hogy a mama megörül az ötletnek: szegény asszony annyi éven át igyekezett tartani azt a bizonyos társadalmi rangot, melynek szintjén bármiféle kiskereskedelem elképzelhetetlen.

Ez a nehézség semmivé foszlott egy olyan fordulat következtében, melyet Freddy anyja várt legkevésbé. Clara, kinek számára a művészvilág volt az elérhető legmagasabb kör, e világba tett kirándulásai során rájött, hogy ha nem akar kicseppenni a társalgásból, alaposan el kell mélyednie H. G. Wells regényeiben. Fűtől-fától kölcsönkérte hát a Wells-regényeket, s ritka buzgalommal látott munkának: két hónap alatt felfalta valamennyit. Ennek eredménye aztán olyan pálfordulás lett, mely napjainkban cseppet sem ritka. Egy modern "Apostolok cselekedetei" ötven egész bibliát megtölthetne, ha egyáltalán valaki képes volna megírni.

Szegény Clara, aki Higgins meg az öreg Higginsné szemében afféle nevetséges, kellemetlen perszóna volt - tulajdon anyja szemében pedig valami érthetetlen rejtély, valami társadalmi tévedés -, szegény Clara nem látta magát kívülről sem egyik, sem másik megvilágításban. Mert ha kissé nevették és csipkedték is West Kensingtonban - mint e tájon mindenkit -, végül is úgy tekintették, mint normális, elfogadható - vagy mondjuk: elkerülhetetlen - istenteremtését. Legföljebb azt mondták rá: afféle törtető; de éppoly kevéssé vették észre, mint maga Clara, hogy voltaképpen sötétben tapogatózik, és rossz irányba törtet. Egyszóval Clara nem volt boldog. Egyre inkább kétségbeesett. Egyebe sem volt, mint az a rang, hogy az epsomi zöldséges a "hintós nagysága"-ként emlegette anyját. Ennek a rangnak pedig nyilván igen kevés volt a forgalmi értéke; s méghozzá megfosztotta Clarát mindenféle neveltetéstől, hiszen az ő viszonyaik mellett legfeljebb a zöldséges lányával nevelkedhetett volna együtt. Ragaszkodva a nívóhoz, az anyja rangjabeli társasága után futott; ez a társaság pedig nem kért őbelőle, hiszen Clara sokkal szegényebb volt a zöldségesnél is. Még komornáról vagy akárcsak szobalányról sem álmodhatott; meg kellett elégednie egy rosszul tartott mindenes cseléddel. Ilyen körülmények közt sehogy sem sikerült neki hamisítatlan, villanegyedbeli úrilány szerepét játszani. De rangjának magasáról tekintve minden számára elérhető "parti" elviselhetetlenül megalázó lett volna. Kereskedőktől, kishivatalnokoktól egyszerűen irtózott. Festők, írók után futott, de sehogy sem tudta őket elbájolni. Hiába szedte fel s használta nyakra-főre a művészvilág szólásait: ezzel is csak bosszantott mindenkit. Egyszóval, félresikerült figura volt mindenestül: lehetetlen, műveletlen, kellemetlen, szerénytelen, vagyontalan, haszontalan sznob. S bár Clara el nem ismerte volna ezt a sok szörnyűséget (hisz az ilyen kellemetlen igazságokkal senki sem néz szembe, míg van módja félrenézni), mégsem lehetett kibékülve helyzetével: végül is mindez az ő hátán csattant.

Clara számára valóságos kinyilatkoztatás volt, mikor egy magakorú lány oly hirtelen lelkesedésre lobbantotta, megigézte, követésre csábította és barátnőjéül hódította - de legkivált mikor kiderült, hogy ez a csodálatos lény néhány hónap alatt vakarodott ki az alvilág sarából. Ez az esemény úgy megrázta Clarát, hogy mikor aztán H. G. Wells ragyogó tollával elbűvölte, s egyszeriben abba a magasságba röpítette, honnét egész addigi életét és körét immár az emberi szükségletek s a helyes társadalmi berendezés szempontjából nézhette, a mester olyan pálfordulást és olyan bűntudatot váltott ki belőle, mint egy Booth generális vagy Gipsy Smith, az Üdvhadsereg legragyogóbb térítő hadjáratain. Clara sznobizmusa semmivé foszlott. Egyszerre az élet sodrába került. Anélkül, hogy tudta volna, hogyan s miért: barátai és ellenségei támadtak. Bizonyos ismerősei, kiknek számára eddig afféle közömbös, unalmas vagy komikus teher volt, most hirtelen faképnél hagyták; mások annál szívesebbé lettek iránta. Meglepődve tapasztalta, hogy bizonyos "bájos" emberek valósággal telítve vannak Wellsszel, s hogy bájosságuk titka voltaképpen az eszmék iránti fogékonyság. Olyanok, akiket mélyen vallásosnak gondolt, de ezen az alapon mindhiába próbált megnyerni, most egyszerre érdeklődéssel fordultak felé, s elárulták, hogy ellenségei a hagyományos vallásosságnak. (Ilyesmit Clara azelőtt csak a legelvetemültebb alakokról tételezett volna fel.) Új barátai elolvastatták vele Galsworthyt; Galsworthy pedig meggyőzte a villanegyed életének hívságos voltáról - s ezzel végképp leterítette. Clarát ette a méreg, ha arra gondolt, hogy börtöne, melyben annyi esztendőn át sorvadozott, tulajdonképpen egész idő alatt nyitva állt; hisz épp azok a hajlamai szerezhettek volna számára igaz barátokat, melyeket erővel fojtott el magában, csupa társadalmi "helyezkedésből". E kinyilatkoztatás fényében s felkorbácsolt lelke mámorában Clara ugyanolyan gátlástalanul bolond módjára viselkedett a nagy nyilvánosság előtt, mint annak idején Higginsné szalonjában, mikor olyan kapva kapott Liza "kiszólásain". Mert Wells újdonsült hívének éppoly megmosolyogtató ügyefogyottsággal kellett megtennie első botladozó lépéseit, mint valami kisbabának. De hát senki sem haragszik egy kisbabára gyámoltalansága miatt, és senki sem gondol róla rosszat, mikor meg akarja enni a gyufát. Clarát sem utálták meg barátai a hóbortjai miatt. Gyakran szeme közé nevettek ezekben az időkben, s ilyenkor rajta volt a sor, hogy védje magát és állja a sarat, ahogy tudja.

Mikor Freddy hazalátogatott Earlscourtba (melynek, hacsak tehette, a táját is kerülte), hogy kirukkoljon a családi címert beszennyező, szörnyű üzletnyitási tervvel, már egy feldúlt otthonba érkezett. Húga épp előzőleg jelentette be, hogy ő is állásba megy egy Dover utcai stílbútor-kereskedésbe, melyet egyik Wells-rajongó barátnője nyitott. Clara ezt az állást régebbi társas életi törtetésének köszönhette. Annak idején ugyanis fejébe vette, hogy kerüljön bármibe, de ő bizony meg fogja ismerni Wells mestert, a maga testi valóságában. Addig ügyeskedett, míg egy garden partyn végre nem hajtotta tervét. A vakmerő vállalkozást nem várt szerencse kísérte. Wells úr beváltotta Clara hozzá fűzött reményeit. A mesteren nyoma sem volt öregedésnek vagy fásultságnak: szelleme akár egy félórán át egyfolytában sziporkázott. Ellenállhatatlan volt finomsága és határozottsága, kicsiny keze és lába, kiapadhatatlan ötletgazdagsága, természetes közvetlensége, de kivált a minden picike porcikájából sugárzó, rendkívüli érzékenységű és fogékonyságú intelligenciája. E találkozás után Clara hosszú hetekig csak róla tudott beszélni. S mivel a stílbútoros hölgy előtt is szóba hozta, s mivel a hölgynek is leghőbb vágya volt, hogy megismerje Wells mestert, és csinos holmikat adhasson el neki: e cél érdekében állást ajánlott üzletében Clarának.

Ez volt Liza szerencséje; mert így a virágüzlettel szemben várható ellenállás semmivé foszlott. A bolt ott van a Viktória és Albert Múzeum közelében, egy vasútállomás árkádja alatt. Aki a környéken lakik, akár mindennap bemehet egy szál virágot venni a gomblyukába Lizától.

Itt az utolsó alkalom valami regényes fordulatra! Ugye, mindenki szívesen hallaná, hogy az üzlet bámulatosan felvirágzott, hála Liza bájos lényének és egykori piaci tapasztalatainak. Sajnos, meg kell mondanunk az igazat: az üzlet bizony sokáig csak bukdácsolt, egyszerűen azért, mert sem Liza, sem Freddy nem értett az üzletvezetéshez. Igaz, Lizának nem kellett az ábécénél kezdeni a szakmát: tudta már az olcsóbb virágok nevét, árát. S milyen határtalan büszkeséggel töltötte el, mikor rájött, hogy Freddy (mint afféle olcsó, rátarti és haszontalan iskolák neveltje) tud valamit latinul! Ez a latintudás nem volt valami sok, de épp elég arra, hogy felesége szemében egy új Porson vagy Bentley fényével tündököljön, s ahhoz is, hogy kisilabizálja a virágok szakjegyzékét. Sajnos, ezenkívül semmit sem tudott. Liza pedig, ha meg tudta is számolni a pénzt - legalább az aprót -, s ha ráragadt is valami Milton nyelvéből, mikor Higginsszel együtt a döntő ütközetre készült: egy számlát már képtelen lett volna megírni, anélkül, hogy gyalázatos hírbe ne keverje a céget. Freddy a latintudománya, hogy "Balbus épített egy falat" és "Gallia három részre oszlott", távolról sem segítette hozzá a legcsekélyebb kereskedelmi ismeretekhez sem. Még azt is Pickering ezredesnek kellett megmagyaráznia, hogy mi fán terem a csekk-könyv meg a bankszámla. S mindezt nem volt könnyű a fiatal pár fejébe verni. Freddy is egy nótát fújt Lizával, mikor az makacsul szembeszegült ama bölcs javaslattal, hogy - csupa takarékosságból is - legjobb lesz egy hozzáértő könyvelőt fogadni. Hogy lehetne pénzt megtakarítani azzal, ami újabb kiadást jelent - így okoskodtak mindketten -, hiszen már a meglevő kiadások mellett sem tudnak nyeregben maradni. De az ezredes - miután újra meg újra nyeregbe segítette őket - végül is kedvesen, de határozottan sarkára állt. Lizát már porig alázta, hogy mindig tőle kell pénzt koldulni, s vérig sértette Higgins harsány derűje, melynek örök céltáblája volt Freddy "sikere" a munka mezején. Így hát végül is be kellett látnia, hogy a kereskedelmet éppúgy tanulni kell, mint a fonetikát.

Hadd ne ecseteljem azokat a siralmas estéket, melyeket az ifjú pár kereskedelmi kurzusokon fecsérelt el, együtt tanulva a gyorsírást, gépírást, könyvelést, mindenféle, elemi iskolák padjaiból jött hím- és nőnemű írnokjelöltekkel egy sorban. Volt egy esti tanfolyam a Londoni Közgazdasági Akadémián, itt egy nap az igazgatónál egy szerény hölgy jelent meg, s arra kérte, ajánljon neki olyan kurzust, ahol virágkereskedelmet tanítanak. Az igazgató jó humorú ember volt, s rögtön előadta a kínai metafizikáról értekező dickensi hős módszerét, aki olvasott egy cikket Kínáról, egyet meg a metafizikáról, s a kettőt kombinálva, megalkotta saját művét. Javasolta az ifjú párnak, hogy kombinálják a Közgazdasági Akadémiát a Kertészeti Iskolával. Liza úgy vélte, hogy a dickensi hős eljárása tökéletesen logikus (aminthogy az is volt), s egy cseppet sem nevetséges (itt már sántított az okoskodás) - nos, Liza halálosan komolyan vette az igazgató tanácsát. De legkeservesebb megalázkodás hősnőnk számára az a pillanat volt, mikor meg kellett kérnie Higginst, hogy tanítsa meg rendesen írni. A tanárnak ugyanis, a miltoni poézis mellett, másik kedvenc bogara a kalligráfia volt, s ő maga is gyönyörű itáliai stílben rótta a jobbra dűlt betűket. Higgins először kijelentette, hogy Liza alkatilag képtelen leírni egyetlen olyan betűt, mely méltó lehetne Miltonnak akár legszürkébb szavához is. De a lány nem adta fel a harcot, és Higgins újra fejest ugrott a munkába, hol viharos kitörésekkel, hol emberfölötti türelemmel tanítva Lizát, olykor-olykor ragyogó előadásokat rögtönözve az emberi kézírás szépségéről, nemességéről és fennkölt hivatásáról. Mindennek eredményeképpen Liza elsajátított egy üzletileg teljességgel hasznavehetetlen, de az ő egyéni báját annál inkább kifejező kézírást. Háromszor annyit költött papirosra, mint bárki más, mert bizonyos sajátos minőségű és formátumú ívek nélkül neki sem ült az írásnak. Még egy borítékot is képtelen lett volna annak rendje és módja szerint megcímezni, hisz úgy elrontotta volna a margót.

A különféle kurzusokra való járás a szégyen és kétségbeesés időszaka volt a fiatal pár számára. Hiába, sehol sem tanítottak semmit a virágüzletekről. Végül is föladták a küzdelmet, s búcsút mondtak gyorsíró-tanfolyamnak, Kereskedelmi Iskolának, Közgazdasági Akadémiának - mindörökre. De közben az üzlet, titokzatos módon, magamagától menni kezdett. A fiatalok valahogy már nem idegenkedtek attól a gondolattól, hogy alkalmazottakat fogadjanak. Egyre inkább úgy érezték, hogy ez az ő sajátos módszerük a legjobb, s hogy valami különleges tehetségük van a kereskedelemhez. Az ezredes, aki éveken keresztül állandóan fenntartott bankszámláján bizonyos összeget az üzlet deficitjének fedezésére, egyszer csak azt vette észre, hogy a támogatás felesleges: a fiatal pár boldogul. Igaz, hogy némileg könnyebb helyzetben voltak, mint más szaktársaik. A hétvégi kirándulások költsége nem az ő gondjuk volt, s így a vasárnapi ebédek árát is megtakaríthatták. Az ezredes ilyenkor felajánlotta autóját, s a két agglegény fizette a hotelszámlát. Ami a boltot illeti: hamarosan kiderült, hogy a spárga is kelendő cikk, s a spárga után következett a többi zöldség - mindazáltal F. Hill, virág- és zöldségkereskedő választékos külseje előkelő jelleget kölcsönzött az üzletnek. A magánéletben pedig továbbra is megmaradt ő Frederick Eynsford Hill úrnak. Nem mintha valami nagyon rátarti lett volna: Lizán kívül más nem is tudta, hogy férjét annak idején a nemesen hangzó Frederick Challoner kettős névre keresztelték. De Liza aztán feszített vele, mint annak a rendje.

Eddig a történet: így ütött ki a dolog. De meglepő, hogy hősnőnk az üzlet s a saját háztartása ellenére is mennyit ott lábatlankodik a Wimpole utcai házban. S érdekes megemlíteni, hogy Liza, aki sohasem bántja Freddyt - az ezredest meg éppenséggel apjaként szereti -, arról mindmáig nem tudott leszokni, hogy Higginsszel marakodjék, már ahogy ez megpecsételődött ama végzetes éjszakán, mikor a tanár számára megnyerte a fogadást. Liza ma is felkapja a fejét minden kis kihívásra, sőt, néha ok nélkül is. Higgins már egyetlen olyan tréfát sem mer megkockáztatni, mely célzás lehet a maga s a Freddy intelligenciája közt tátongó űrre. Olykor tombol, sérteget, gúnyolódik, de Liza oly harciasan száll vele szembe, hogy az ezredesnek minduntalan kérlelnie kell, bánjon kissé kedvesebben Higginsszel. Ez az egyetlen alkalom, mikor Pickering szavaira Liza arcán makacs dac jelenik meg. S mindezt már csak valami olyan rendkívüli sorsfordulat vagy óriási szerencsétlenség változtathatná meg (Isten mentsen tőle!), mely összezavarna bennük minden szimpátiát és antipátiát, s erővel hámozná ki közös ember voltukat. Liza tudja, hogy Higginsnek nincs rá szüksége, mint ahogy nem volt őrá szüksége az apjának sem. Mikor Higgins azt mondta neki amaz emlékezetes napon, hogy megszokta már a házban, hogy ragaszkodik hozzá apró szolgálataiért, s hogy hiányozna, ha elmenne: e szavakkal mélyen elültette lelkében azt a meggyőződést, hogy a tanár számára "nem ér többet, mint egy pár papucs". (Freddy vagy az ezredes bezzeg sosem beszélt volna vele úgy, mint Higgins!) De valahogy azt is érzi Liza, hogy a tanár fölényes közönye nemesebb, mint holmi közönséges lelkek önteltsége. Higgins ma is határtalanul érdekli. Sőt vannak titkos, pajkos pillanatai, mikor azt kívánja: bár volnának együtt ketten, távol minden emberi szemtől, s szabadon minden köteléktől, valami puszta szigeten, ahol a mestert lerángathatná végre piedesztáljáról, s megláthatná, hogy ő is csak éppúgy szerelmeskedik, mint más közönséges halandó. Mindnyájunknak vannak ilyen titkos ábrándjai. De mikor aztán komoly dolgokról van szó, a való életről, nem pedig holmi álmokról és szeszélyekről, akkor Liza Freddyhez vonzódik, meg az ezredeshez, s nem szereti Higginst és Doolittle urat. Galatea sohasem szereti Pygmaliont mindenestül: a mester elviselhetetlenül isteni.

  

1912



FeltöltőP. T.
Az idézet forrásahttp://mek.oszk.hu

minimap