Ez az oldal sütiket használ

A portál felületén sütiket (cookies) használ, vagyis a rendszer adatokat tárol az Ön böngészőjében. A sütik személyek azonosítására nem alkalmasak, szolgáltatásaink biztosításához szükségesek. Az oldal használatával Ön beleegyezik a sütik használatába.

Gratulálunk! Az Év Fordítója 2019-ben Fehér Illés!
Hírek

Shakespeare, William: Coriolanus (Detail)

Shakespeare, William portréja

Coriolanus (Detail) (Angol)


ACT I.

SCENE I.

Rome. A street.

Enter a company of mutinous Citizens, with staves, clubs, and other weapons

First Citizen

Before we proceed any further, hear me speak.

All

Speak, speak.

First Citizen

You are all resolved rather to die than to famish?

All

Resolved. resolved.

First Citizen

First, you know Caius Marcius is chief enemy to the people.

All

We know't, we know't.

First Citizen

Let us kill him, and we'll have corn at our own price.
Is't a verdict?

All

No more talking on't; let it be done: away, away!

Second Citizen

One word, good citizens.

First Citizen

We are accounted poor citizens, the patricians good.
What authority surfeits on would relieve us: if they
would yield us but the superfluity, while it were
wholesome, we might guess they relieved us humanely;
but they think we are too dear: the leanness that
afflicts us, the object of our misery, is as an
inventory to particularise their abundance; our
sufferance is a gain to them Let us revenge this with
our pikes, ere we become rakes: for the gods know I
speak this in hunger for bread, not in thirst for revenge.

Second Citizen

Would you proceed especially against Caius Marcius?

All

Against him first: he's a very dog to the commonalty.

Second Citizen

Consider you what services he has done for his country?

First Citizen

Very well; and could be content to give him good
report fort, but that he pays himself with being proud.

Second Citizen

Nay, but speak not maliciously.

First Citizen

I say unto you, what he hath done famously, he did
it to that end: though soft-conscienced men can be
content to say it was for his country he did it to
please his mother and to be partly proud; which he
is, even till the altitude of his virtue.

Second Citizen

What he cannot help in his nature, you account a
vice in him. You must in no way say he is covetous.

First Citizen

If I must not, I need not be barren of accusations;
he hath faults, with surplus, to tire in repetition.

Shouts within

What shouts are these? The other side o' the city
is risen: why stay we prating here? to the Capitol!

All

Come, come.

First Citizen

Soft! who comes here?

Enter MENENIUS AGRIPPA

Second Citizen

Worthy Menenius Agrippa; one that hath always loved
the people.

First Citizen

He's one honest enough: would all the rest were so!

MENENIUS

What work's, my countrymen, in hand? where go you
With bats and clubs? The matter? speak, I pray you.

First Citizen

Our business is not unknown to the senate; they have
had inkling this fortnight what we intend to do,
which now we'll show 'em in deeds. They say poor
suitors have strong breaths: they shall know we
have strong arms too.

MENENIUS

Why, masters, my good friends, mine honest neighbours,
Will you undo yourselves?

First Citizen

We cannot, sir, we are undone already.

MENENIUS

I tell you, friends, most charitable care
Have the patricians of you. For your wants,
Your suffering in this dearth, you may as well
Strike at the heaven with your staves as lift them
Against the Roman state, whose course will on
The way it takes, cracking ten thousand curbs
Of more strong link asunder than can ever
Appear in your impediment. For the dearth,
The gods, not the patricians, make it, and
Your knees to them, not arms, must help. Alack,
You are transported by calamity
Thither where more attends you, and you slander
The helms o' the state, who care for you like fathers,
When you curse them as enemies.

First Citizen

Care for us! True, indeed! They ne'er cared for us
yet: suffer us to famish, and their store-houses
crammed with grain; make edicts for usury, to
support usurers; repeal daily any wholesome act
established against the rich, and provide more
piercing statutes daily, to chain up and restrain
the poor. If the wars eat us not up, they will; and
there's all the love they bear us.

MENENIUS

Either you must
Confess yourselves wondrous malicious,
Or be accused of folly. I shall tell you
A pretty tale: it may be you have heard it;
But, since it serves my purpose, I will venture
To stale 't a little more.

First Citizen

Well, I'll hear it, sir: yet you must not think to
fob off our disgrace with a tale: but, an 't please
you, deliver.

MENENIUS

There was a time when all the body's members
Rebell'd against the belly, thus accused it:
That only like a gulf it did remain
I' the midst o' the body, idle and unactive,
Still cupboarding the viand, never bearing
Like labour with the rest, where the other instruments
Did see and hear, devise, instruct, walk, feel,
And, mutually participate, did minister
Unto the appetite and affection common
Of the whole body. The belly answer'd--

First Citizen

Well, sir, what answer made the belly?

MENENIUS

Sir, I shall tell you. With a kind of smile,
Which ne'er came from the lungs, but even thus--
For, look you, I may make the belly smile
As well as speak--it tauntingly replied
To the discontented members, the mutinous parts
That envied his receipt; even so most fitly
As you malign our senators for that
They are not such as you.

First Citizen

Your belly's answer? What!
The kingly-crowned head, the vigilant eye,
The counsellor heart, the arm our soldier,
Our steed the leg, the tongue our trumpeter.
With other muniments and petty helps
In this our fabric, if that they--

MENENIUS

What then?
'Fore me, this fellow speaks! What then? what then?

First Citizen

Should by the cormorant belly be restrain'd,
Who is the sink o' the body,--

MENENIUS

Well, what then?

First Citizen

The former agents, if they did complain,
What could the belly answer?

MENENIUS

I will tell you
If you'll bestow a small--of what you have little--
Patience awhile, you'll hear the belly's answer.

First Citizen

Ye're long about it.

MENENIUS

Note me this, good friend;
Your most grave belly was deliberate,
Not rash like his accusers, and thus answer'd:
'True is it, my incorporate friends,' quoth he,
'That I receive the general food at first,
Which you do live upon; and fit it is,
Because I am the store-house and the shop
Of the whole body: but, if you do remember,
I send it through the rivers of your blood,
Even to the court, the heart, to the seat o' the brain;
And, through the cranks and offices of man,
The strongest nerves and small inferior veins
From me receive that natural competency
Whereby they live: and though that all at once,
You, my good friends,'--this says the belly, mark me,--

First Citizen

Ay, sir; well, well.

MENENIUS

'Though all at once cannot
See what I do deliver out to each,
Yet I can make my audit up, that all
From me do back receive the flour of all,
And leave me but the bran.' What say you to't?

First Citizen

It was an answer: how apply you this?

MENENIUS

The senators of Rome are this good belly,
And you the mutinous members; for examine
Their counsels and their cares, digest things rightly
Touching the weal o' the common, you shall find
No public benefit which you receive
But it proceeds or comes from them to you
And no way from yourselves. What do you think,
You, the great toe of this assembly?

First Citizen

I the great toe! why the great toe?

MENENIUS

For that, being one o' the lowest, basest, poorest,
Of this most wise rebellion, thou go'st foremost:
Thou rascal, that art worst in blood to run,
Lead'st first to win some vantage.
But make you ready your stiff bats and clubs:
Rome and her rats are at the point of battle;
The one side must have bale.

Enter CAIUS MARCIUS

Hail, noble Marcius!

MARCIUS

Thanks. What's the matter, you dissentious rogues,
That, rubbing the poor itch of your opinion,
Make yourselves scabs?

First Citizen

We have ever your good word.

MARCIUS

He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? the one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
Where he should find you lions, finds you hares;
Where foxes, geese: you are no surer, no,
Than is the coal of fire upon the ice,
Or hailstone in the sun. Your virtue is
To make him worthy whose offence subdues him
And curse that justice did it.
Who deserves greatness
Deserves your hate; and your affections are
A sick man's appetite, who desires most that
Which would increase his evil. He that depends
Upon your favours swims with fins of lead
And hews down oaks with rushes. Hang ye! Trust Ye?
With every minute you do change a mind,
And call him noble that was now your hate,
Him vile that was your garland. What's the matter,
That in these several places of the city
You cry against the noble senate, who,
Under the gods, keep you in awe, which else
Would feed on one another? What's their seeking?

MENENIUS

For corn at their own rates; whereof, they say,
The city is well stored.

MARCIUS

Hang 'em! They say!
They'll sit by the fire, and presume to know
What's done i' the Capitol; who's like to rise,
Who thrives and who declines; side factions
and give out
Conjectural marriages; making parties strong
And feebling such as stand not in their liking
Below their cobbled shoes. They say there's
grain enough!
Would the nobility lay aside their ruth,
And let me use my sword, I'll make a quarry
With thousands of these quarter'd slaves, as high
As I could pick my lance.

MENENIUS

Nay, these are almost thoroughly persuaded;
For though abundantly they lack discretion,
Yet are they passing cowardly. But, I beseech you,
What says the other troop?

MARCIUS

They are dissolved: hang 'em!
They said they were an-hungry; sigh'd forth proverbs,
That hunger broke stone walls, that dogs must eat,
That meat was made for mouths, that the gods sent not
Corn for the rich men only: with these shreds
They vented their complainings; which being answer'd,
And a petition granted them, a strange one--
To break the heart of generosity,
And make bold power look pale--they threw their caps
As they would hang them on the horns o' the moon,
Shouting their emulation.

MENENIUS

What is granted them?

MARCIUS

Five tribunes to defend their vulgar wisdoms,
Of their own choice: one's Junius Brutus,
Sicinius Velutus, and I know not--'Sdeath!
The rabble should have first unroof'd the city,
Ere so prevail'd with me: it will in time
Win upon power and throw forth greater themes
For insurrection's arguing.

MENENIUS

This is strange.

MARCIUS

Go, get you home, you fragments!

Enter a Messenger, hastily

Messenger

Where's Caius Marcius?

MARCIUS

Here: what's the matter?

Messenger

The news is, sir, the Volsces are in arms.

MARCIUS

I am glad on 't: then we shall ha' means to vent
Our musty superfluity. See, our best elders.

Enter COMINIUS, TITUS LARTIUS, and other Senators; JUNIUS BRUTUS and SICINIUS VELUTUS

First Senator

Marcius, 'tis true that you have lately told us;
The Volsces are in arms.

MARCIUS

They have a leader,
Tullus Aufidius, that will put you to 't.
I sin in envying his nobility,
And were I any thing but what I am,
I would wish me only he.

COMINIUS

You have fought together.

MARCIUS

Were half to half the world by the ears and he.
Upon my party, I'ld revolt to make
Only my wars with him: he is a lion
That I am proud to hunt.

First Senator

Then, worthy Marcius,
Attend upon Cominius to these wars.

COMINIUS

It is your former promise.

MARCIUS

Sir, it is;
And I am constant. Titus Lartius, thou
Shalt see me once more strike at Tullus' face.
What, art thou stiff? stand'st out?

TITUS

No, Caius Marcius;
I'll lean upon one crutch and fight with t'other,
Ere stay behind this business.

MENENIUS

O, true-bred!

First Senator

Your company to the Capitol; where, I know,
Our greatest friends attend us.

TITUS

[To COMINIUS] Lead you on.

To MARCIUS

Right worthy you priority.

COMINIUS

Noble Marcius!

First Senator

[To the Citizens] Hence to your homes; be gone!

MARCIUS

Nay, let them follow:
The Volsces have much corn; take these rats thither
To gnaw their garners. Worshipful mutiners,
Your valour puts well forth: pray, follow.

Citizens steal away. Exeunt all but SICINIUS and BRUTUS

SICINIUS

Was ever man so proud as is this Marcius?

BRUTUS

He has no equal.

SICINIUS

When we were chosen tribunes for the people,--

BRUTUS

Mark'd you his lip and eyes?

SICINIUS

Nay. but his taunts.

BRUTUS

Being moved, he will not spare to gird the gods.

SICINIUS

Be-mock the modest moon.

BRUTUS

The present wars devour him: he is grown
Too proud to be so valiant.

SICINIUS

Such a nature,
Tickled with good success, disdains the shadow
Which he treads on at noon: but I do wonder
His insolence can brook to be commanded
Under Cominius.

BRUTUS

Fame, at the which he aims,
In whom already he's well graced, can not
Better be held nor more attain'd than by
A place below the first: for what miscarries
Shall be the general's fault, though he perform
To the utmost of a man, and giddy censure
Will then cry out of Marcius 'O if he
Had borne the business!'

SICINIUS

Besides, if things go well,
Opinion that so sticks on Marcius shall
Of his demerits rob Cominius.

BRUTUS

Come:
Half all Cominius' honours are to Marcius.
Though Marcius earned them not, and all his faults
To Marcius shall be honours, though indeed
In aught he merit not.

SICINIUS

Let's hence, and hear
How the dispatch is made, and in what fashion,
More than his singularity, he goes
Upon this present action.

BRUTUS

Lets along.

Exeunt



Coriolanus (Részlet) (Magyar)


Első felvonás

1. Szín

Róma. Utca.

Jön egy csapat zavargó polgár botokkal, fütykösökkel s egyéb fegyverekkel

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Mielőtt valamire szánjuk magunkat, hadd beszéljek.

TÖBBEN
Beszélj, beszélj!

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Föltettétek magatokban, hogy inkább meghaltok, semhogy éhezzetek?

TÖBBEN
Föl, föl!

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Először is, tudjátok: Cajus Marcius legnagyobb ellensége a népnek.

TÖBBEN
Tudjuk, tudjuk.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Öljük meg őt, s akkor magunk szabhatjuk meg a gabona árát. Nos, határoztatok?

TÖBBEN
Szót se róla többé. Megtesszük. El, el!

MÁSODIK POLGÁR
Egy szót, jó polgárok.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Minket szegény polgároknak tartanak, s a patríciusokat jóknak. Az ő fölöslegök
eltáplálna bennünket. Ha csak azt adnák nekünk, mi nekik már nem kell, azt
gyaníthatnók, hogy emberségesen enyhítettek rajtunk; de ők azt gondolják, hogy
erre nem vagyunk érdemesek. A soványság, mely bennünket gyötör, az arcunkra
írt nyomorunk a jegyzék, melyben jóllétök el van sorolva; a mi szenvedésünk az
ő nyereségök. Bosszuljuk meg dárdáinkkal, mielőtt magunk is olyan szárazak
lennénk, mint ezek; mert az istenek látják lelkemet, hogy kenyéréhségből beszélek
és nem bosszúszomjból.

MÁSODIK POLGÁR
És éppen Cajus Marcius ellen keltek fel?

TÖBBEN
Ellene először; ő a legkutyább a néphez.

MÁSODIK POLGÁR
Veszitek-e figyelembe, milyen szolgálatokat tett hazájának?

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Helyes, és ezért szívesen is ruháznók föl jó hírnévvel; de ő maga jutalmazza meg
magát kevélységével.

MÁSODIK POLGÁR
Nem, ilyen rossz indulatból ne beszélj.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Mondom nektek, amit dicséretesen tett, csak ezért tette; habár a nagyon
lelkiismeretes emberek azt mondják, hogy ez hazájáért volt, biz azt csak azért
tette, hogy anyjának örömet szerezzen s maga kevélykedhessék, amely tulajdona
érdemeivel egy magasságú.

MÁSODIK POLGÁR
Bűnéül rójátok föl, ami a természete, amin nem változtathat; azt csak nem
foghatjátok rá, hogy kapzsi.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Ha ezt nem is, azért nem fogyok ki a vádakból. Annyi a hibája, hogy elsorolásába
belefárad az ember.

Kívül zaj

Micsoda rivalgás ez? A város másik része fölkelt; mit állunk itt fecsegve? El a
Capitoliumba!

MIND
Jertek, menjünk.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Csendesen! ki jön itt?

Jön Menenius Agrippa

MÁSODIK POLGÁR
A derék Menenius Agrippa, ki mindig szerette a népet.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Ő elég becsületes. Bár a többi is ilyen volna.

MENENIUS
Mitévők vagytok, földiek? Hová e
Botokkal? Mi baj? Kérlek, szóljatok.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Tudja azt a tanács; hallott felőle két hét óta, mi a szándékunk, most tettleg akarjuk
megmutatni. Azt mondják ők, hogy a szegény pörös embernek "erős" a lehelete;
majd meglátják, hogy karjaink is erősek.

MENENIUS
Barátim, szomszédim, tehát azon
Vagytok, hogy tönkre tegyétek magatok?

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Dehogy! Hiszen már úgyis tönkre tettek.

MENENIUS
Mondom, barátim, rátok a nemesség
Gondot visel, s az éhínség miatt, mely
Szenvednetek készt, e botokkal éppen
Úgy fenyegethetnétek az eget,
Miként Rómát, mely egyenest megy a
Kezdett uton, széttépve tízezer
Erősebb láncot, mint minőt reá
Ti vethetnétek. Aztán e nyomort
Az istenek szerzik, nem a nemesség.
Ezen nem kéz, de térdhajtás segít. Ah,
Az ínségtől fölingerelve, még majd
Több bajba estek. Piszkolódtok a
Kormányra, mely atyátokul vagyon, míg
Ti mint ellenség átkozzátok őt.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Atyánk! a bizony! Sohasem volt ránk gondja. Minket éhezni hagynak, s az ő
magtáraik tömvék gabonával; rendeleteket adnak ki az uzsora ellen, hogy az
uzsorásokat segítsék; naponként visszavonnak egy-egy üdvös törvényt a gazdagok
ellen, s naponként keményebb rendszabályokat állítanak föl, hogy a szegénységet
megkötözzék és zabolázzák. Ők emésztenek el bennünket, ha a háborúk nem; ez
az egész szeretet, mellyel irántunk viseltetnek.

MENENIUS
Vagy valljátok be, hogy rosszindulattal
Telétek meg, vagy azt kell hinni, hogy
Bolondok vagytok. Mondok nektek egy
Derék mesét; már hallátok talán,
De minthogy éppen célomhoz segít,
Ismét föltálalom.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Jól van, uram, meghallgatom. De azt ne gondold, hogy bajunkat rászedhetni
mesével: hanem halljuk, ha úgy tetszik.

MENENIUS
Egykor föllázadt a has ellen a
Test minden tagja, s azt így vádolák:
Hogy mint egy örvény vesztegel maga
Ottan középütt, renyhén, tétlenűl,
Az ételt egyre nyelve s társival
A munkát meg nem osztva, míg a többi
Lát, hall, gondolkodik, tanít, megy, érez,
S így kölcsönös segélyadással a
Közjóra törekesznek, az egész
Testnek javára. Így felelt a has...

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Nos hát, uram, mi a has válasza?

MENENIUS
No mindjárt, mindjárt. Olyszerű mosollyal,
mely szívességet tettetett (miért ne
Hagynám mosolyogni a hasat csak úgy,
Miként beszélni?), gúnyosan felelt az
Elégületlenekhez, kik irígylék
Járandóságát... éppen mint ti a
Tanáccsal tesztek, mert ez nem hasonló
Hozzátok.

ELSŐ POLGÁR
A has válaszát! Hogyan,
A koronás fej, a tanácsadó szív,
Az őrködő szem, a vitézi kar,
Paripánk, a láb, s kürtösünk, a nyelv,
S egyéb istápunk s kis segédeink
Alkotmányunkban, hogyha ők...

MENENIUS
Nos aztán?
Mit nem beszél ez a legény! tovább!

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Ha őket így zablázza a faló has,
Ez a szemétdomb...

MENENIUS
Jól van: azután?

ELSŐ POLGÁR
S a többi munkás tag panaszt emel
Mit szólhat a has?

MENENIUS
Megmondom azonnal.
Csak egy parányit, amiből tinektek
Kevés jutott, a türelembül, és
Fogjátok tudni...

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Be hosszúra nyúlik.

MENENIUS
Hát, jó barátom, most figyelj ide.
Megfontolá a dolgot a komoly has,
Nem mint szeles vádlói, s ezt felelte:
"Igazságtok van, társaim, hogy én
Előbb szedem be az ennivalót,
Melyből ti éltek, s ez rendén van így,
Mert én a test magtára s műhelye
Vagyok: de jusson eszetekbe, hogy
Azt én szétküldöm a vér folyamán,
Az udvarig, a szívig s agyvelőig,
S a kanyarokon s mellékútakon
A legerősb ideg s legvékonyabb ér
Megkapja tőlem, ami illeti,
Azt, amiből él, s bár ti összesen,
Kedves barátim", így beszéle a has...

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Jó, jó, uram! nos?

MENENIUS
"Bár ti összesen nem
Látjátok, mit kap mindenik külön:
Bebizonyíthatom, hogy nektek a
Javát, fölét küldöm szét, és magamnak
Csak a seprőt hagyom." Mit szóltok erre?

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Hát felelet; de hozzá mi közünk?

MENENIUS
E jó has Rómának tanácsa, s ti
A lázadó tagok; ha fontolóra
Veszitek gondoskodásit s a közjót:
Általláthatjátok, hogy mindazon
Jótétemény, melyben nyilvánosan
Ti részesültök, tőle származik,
S nem magatoktól. Mit szólsz erre, te
Nagy lábujja e szép gyülekezetnek?

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Én lábnagyujja? Mért a lábnagyujja?

MENENIUS
Mert a legaljasabb s legrongyosabb vagy
E bölcs zavargók közt, s te jársz elől.
Vezérkedel, pimasz sehonnai,
Hogy önmagad húzz hasznot a dologból.
De tartsátok csak készen a kemény
Furkókat, mert Róma s patkányai
Megütköznek, s egyik rész tönkre jut.

Cajus Marcius jön

Üdvöz légy, bajnok Marcius!

MARCIUS
Köszönöm.
Mi dolog ez, ti lázongó gazok,
Kik férges véleményteket vakarva
Megrühösítitek magatokat?

ELSŐ POLGÁR
Te csak mindig szépen beszélsz velünk.

MARCIUS
Ki nektek jó szót ád, utálatos
Hizelgő. Mit vártok, kutyák, akiknek
Nem kell se harc, se béke? Az ijeszt, ez
Dacossá tesz. Ki bennetek bizik,
Oroszlán helyett nyulat lel s ludat
Róka helyett. Nem vagytok biztosabbak,
Mint a parázs a jégen s a napon
A hó. Erénytek, dicsőítni a
Gonosztevőt, s a törvényt szidni, mely azt
Megbünteté. Ki nagyságot szerez,
Gyülölitek; s jóindulattok olyan,
Mint a beteg, ki arra vágy, mi néki
Még jobban árt. Ki kegyetekre épít,
Ólom-karokkal úszik s tölgyeket
Hasít sással. Bitóra véletek!
Tinektek hinni? Egyre változik
Elmétek; kit gyülöltetek, dicső most,
S akit megkoszorúztatok, silány.
Mi baj? mit zúgtok minden piacon
Az érdemes tanács ellen, holott ő
Tart rendben istenink után? különben
Egymást falnátok föl. Mi kell nekik?

MENENIUS
Mint ők szabják, oly áron gabona,
Amely, mint mondják, van bőségesen.

MARCIUS
Azt mondják? Az akasztani valók!
Ott ülnek a tűznél, s tudják, mi újság
A Capitoliumban, hogy ki van
Le- s fölmenőben? Házasítanak,
Pártot csinálnak és erősitik,
S azt gyöngitik, mely nem kedvök szerinti,
És nem sarújok talpa. Bőviben van
Gabona, mondják? Hagyna csak a nemesség
Kardomhoz nyúlni: oly magas kazalt
Raknék e fölnégyelt rabszolganépből,
Amíly magasra csak fölérne dárdám.

MENENIUS
Meg vannak győzve csaknem teljesen;
Elméjökben nagy a hiány ugyan,
De szörnyü gyávák. Ám szólj, mit csinál a
Másik csapat?

MARCIUS
Szétment. Kössék fel őket!
Sohajtva példáztak, hogy éhesek, hogy
Éhség falat dönt, enni kell az ebnek,
A csontra hús kell, nem csak gazdagért van
Az aratás. Ily rongyokban dobálták
Ki a panaszt. És most, hogy megnyerék,
Amit kivántak, s ez kemény dolog
(A nemességen ez vesz majd erőt, ez
Veri le), most kucsmáikat dobálják,
Minthogyha a hold szarvára akarnák
Föltűzni, versenyt bőgve.

MENENIUS
S mit nyerének?

MARCIUS
Öt szónokot, kit ők választanak pór
Bölcsességök védőiűl; ezek
Brutus, Sicinius... mit tudom én! Hah,
Előbb földúlná e gaznép a várost,
Mint tőlem ilyet kapna. Majd idővel
Még többet nyer, s ismét többet csikar ki
A lázadás zajával.

MENENIUS
Különös.

MARCIUS
El, hulladék, pusztuljatok haza!

Követ jön

KÖVET
Hol Cajus Marcius?

MARCIUS
Itt van; mi baj?

KÖVET
Újság, uram; a volszkok fegyverre keltek.

MARCIUS
Annál jobb! lesz módunk kihányni a
Dohos fölösleget. Im, derék atyáink.

Cominius, Titus Lartius s más szenátorok, Junius Brutus és Sicinius Velutus jőnek

ELSŐ SZENÁTOR
Igaz, mit nem rég mondál, Marcius:
A volszk fegyverre kelt.

MARCIUS
Vezére Tullus
Aufidius; lesz véle bajotok.
Vétkül vallom: nemességét irígylem;
S ne volnék az, ki most vagyok: szeretném,
Ha ő lennék.

COMINIUS
Ti együtt vívtatok.

MARCIUS
Ha birkóznék a föld, két részre állva,
S ő velem volna: átmennék, hogy ő
Velem vívjék... oroszlán ő, kire
Büszkén vadászok.

ELSŐ SZENÁTOR
Így, hős Marcius,
Kisérd Cominiust e háborúba.

COMINIUS
Megígéréd ezt egykor.

MARCIUS
Meg, uram,
S szavamnak állok. Titus Lartius, majd
Megint szemközt látod Tullust velem. De
Nyomorék vagy? Honn kell maradnod?

TITUS
Ó, nem,
E mankó támaszom s ez fegyverem lesz,
De az ügyet nem hagyom el.

MENENIUS
Dicső faj!

ELSŐ SZENÁTOR
Jerünk a Capitoliumba; legjobb
Barátink várnak.

TITUS
Menj elől... utána
Cominius... mi követünk; tiétek
Az elsőség.

ELSŐ SZENÁTOR
(a polgárokhoz)
El, el, haza!

MARCIUS
Nem, hadd kövessenek. Van
Búza a volszknál. Patkánynép, oda
A garmadához! Tisztes lázadók,
Hol a bátorság? Kérlek, jöjjetek.

Szenátorok, Cominius, Marcius, Titus és Menenius el. Polgárok kisompolyognak

SICINIUS
E Marciusnak van-e párja gőgben?

BRUTUS
Páratlan áll.

SICINIUS
Midőn népszónokoknak
Megválasztának bennünket...

BRUTUS
Figyelted,
Mit mondott szeme-szája?

SICINIUS
Hogy gunyolt!

BRUTUS
Ha ingerült, az istenek se szentek.
Előtte.

SICINIUS
Csúfot űz a tiszta holdból.

BRUTUS
Bár veszne e harcban! Nagyon fejébe
Szállt a vitézség.

SICINIUS
Hogyha jó siker
Csiklandja, saját árnyát megveti,
Amelybe délben lép. Csodálkozom,
Hogy tűri dölyfe, hogy Cominius
Vezér fölötte?

BRUTUS
A hírt, melyre tör,
S mely őt diszíti is már, nem lehet
Jobban fönntartani s növelni, mint
Másod helyen; mert a vezér hibája
Mi el nem sül, bár mindent elkövet,
Mi embertől telik, s így zúgnak a
Könnyelmü bírák: hejh, ha Marciusra
Bíznák a dolgot!

SICINIUS
És ha sikerül:
A Marciushoz hajló vélemény
Cominiusnak minden érdemét
Őrá ruházza.

BRUTUS
Úgy van, már is az
Övé Cominiusnak fél hire,
Nem ő szerzé bár; és ennek hibái
Dicsőségévé válnak, bár valóban
Nem érdemlé meg.

SICINIUS
Nézzük meg, minő
Az útasítás és hogy viseli
Magát ez ügyben?

BRUTUS
Jer, menjünk tehát.

El mind a ketten



KiadóEurópa
Az idézet forrásaWilliam Shakespeare: Coriolanus

minimap